Navigation Links
Secondhand Smoke Affecting Millions of New Yorkers
Date:4/9/2009

Nonsmokers have higher-than-average levels of residue, study finds

THURSDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of New York City residents who do not smoke have elevated levels of the residue of secondhand smoke in their blood, says the city's health department.

And that suggests that nonsmokers in the city -- a number the city estimates at 2.5 million people -- are not adequately protected from cigarette smoke, it says.

"This is not what we expected," Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, the city health commissioner and a co-author of the study, told the New York Times. "It is a shocking number."

A study of 2,000 people by the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, published online this week in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research, found that 57 percent of nonsmoking adults in New York City had elevated levels of cotinine in their blood, compared with 45 percent of nonsmokers nationwide. Cotinine, a byproduct of nicotine breakdown, is not harmful but signals exposure to tobacco smoke.

Among nonsmoking New Yorkers, 69 percent of Asian adults are thought to have elevated cotinine levels, putting them at the top of the list, according to the study. Lower-income adults were more likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke than those with higher incomes -- 63 percent vs. 54 percent, the study found.

Data for the study came from a citywide Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2004, one year after the city's smoke-free air law took effect. The law aims to protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke at work and in some public places.

"The study provides more evidence of the pervasiveness of secondhand smoke," Jennifer Ellis, a former health department epidemiologist and the study's lead author, said in a news release from the city. "It's not clear why New Yorkers experience more exposure, despite the city's relatively low smoking rate. It may be that living and working in close quarters with one another puts us at higher risk."

Despite the city's smoking restrictions, nonsmokers are still exposed to secondhand smoke on sidewalks, including near buildings, at bus stops and at subway entrances.

Also, people who live in apartments and condominiums might also be exposed to secondhand smoke that drifts from one unit to another in a building, according to Dr. Jonathan P. Winickoff, a professor at Harvard Medical School.

"Smoke doesn't know to stop at a doorway," Winickoff told the Times. "It fills the full capacity of every indoor location in which the cigarette is smoked."

Frieden, who described tobacco smoke as a "toxic pollutant," said in the news release that "most New York City nonsmokers are breathing in dangerous chemicals in secondhand smoke, potentially increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease."

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about secondhand smoke.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCES: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, news release, April 8, 2009; April 9, 2009, New York Times


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Acting Surgeon General Announces National Initiatives to Protect Children by Reducing Exposure to Secondhand Smoke
2. Secondhand smoke increases teen test failure
3. Secondhand Smoke Hurts Kids Grades
4. Indiana Legislature Should Protect All Workers from Secondhand Smoke
5. Novel MRI technique shows secondhand smoke damages lungs
6. Secondhand smoke damages lungs, MRIs show
7. Special MRI Shows Secondhand Smoke Damages Lungs
8. Novel MRI Technique Shows Secondhand Smoke Damages Lungs
9. Global Initiative To Protect Children From Secondhand Smoke
10. Secondhand Smoke Worsens Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis Patients
11. World Cancer Campaign Builds Momentum Globally with International Initiative to Protect Children From Secondhand Smoke
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Secondhand Smoke Affecting Millions of New Yorkers
(Date:9/25/2017)... ... ... Bobbie Horowitz was hardly able to walk without excruciating pain in her late ... producer, Horowitz would manage to get to rehearsals on time, but wasn’t able to ... had to take a cab everywhere. , It wasn’t until she saw a ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... ... September 25, 2017 , ... Bioclinica®, ... today announces that 30 of its domain experts will present on a ... upcoming industry conferences and webinars. Drawing on broad and deep industry experience ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) , ... September 25, 2017 , ... ... new New Port Richey, Fla. location at 5304 Main Street as an interventional pain ... pain of the spine and extremities. He joins PPOA from private practice In Brooksville, ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... ... September 25, 2017 , ... Leonard Bley, MD ... next generation for LASIK in Manhattan with Contoura Vision, the latest WaveLight® topographic-guided ... systems available in the United States to correct nearsightedness and nearsightedness with astigmatism. ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Dr. Edward Hebert is celebrating his 33rd anniversary ... else,” said Dr. Hebert. “I count my blessings daily for the opportunity that the ... is what I look forward to the most. The relationships I have with my ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/5/2017)... LONDON , Sept. 5, 2017  Just 18 ... Valid Insight is pleased to announce the appointment of ... Tammy Wynne , Dominic Jones-Phillips and ... from industry. ... a team of market access writers. She has over ...
(Date:9/1/2017)... Sept. 1, 2017 Michael Penna , ... , highlights opportunities for growth in his response to ... Marlin Equity is seeking a buyer for eMDs. Penna,s ... 22-year-old healthcare solutions Value Added Reseller and national leader ... "As the healthcare market continues to ...
(Date:9/1/2017)... WHIPPANY, N.J. , Sept. 1, 2017  Bayer will ... at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2017 Congress, ... studies presented will include new preclinical and clinical data on ... from two earlier pipeline projects. ... of the best minds in cancer research at ESMO," said ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: