Navigation Links
Scripps Research study underlines potential of new technology to diagnose disease
Date:3/21/2013

JUPITER, FL March 21, 2013 Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in Jupiter, FL, have developed cutting-edge technology that can successfully screen human blood for disease markers. This tool may hold the key to better diagnosing and understanding today's most pressing and puzzling health conditions, including autoimmune diseases.

"This study validates that the 'antigen surrogate' technology will indeed be a powerful tool for diagnostics," said Thomas Kodadek, PhD, a professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Cancer Biology and vice chairman of the Department of Chemistry at TSRI, whose group developed the technology.

The latest study, published in the journal Chemistry & Biology on March 21, 2013, shows how the technology accurately identified human blood markers for neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a rare autoimmune disorder resembling multiple sclerosis that can result in blindness and paralysis. Following a similar study on mouse models for multiple sclerosis two years ago, the work confirms that the technique can also be successfully applied to humans.

Finding the Needle in a Haystack

The blood is filled with molecules called "antibodies" released by the immune system to defend the body against disease. Many autoimmune diseases produce antibodies specific to that disease. Identifying these disease-specific antibodies among the millions of other similar yet non-disease-specific antibodies in the blood, however, is much like finding a needle in a haystack.

Many current diagnostic methods detect disease-specific antibodies by using part of the virus, bacteria or cellular component targeted by the antibody in a patient's body, essentially "fishing" for the antibody using its distinct target as bait. Unfortunately, many disease-specific antibodies and their targets are currently unidentified.

Kodadek and his colleagues have found a way to sidestep this conundrum by substituting these unknown antibody-binding targets with biologically unnatural molecules called "peptoids." Peptoids are chain-like molecules tethered to tiny beads and extended "link by link" by the sequential addition of small chemical subunits. By using different subunits and randomizing their order, chemists can produce libraries of thousands and even millions of different peptoids quickly and easily.

These vast libraries are screened for peptoid "hits" that bind exclusively to antibodies found only in patients known to have a specific disease. "We find disease biomarkers differently [than anyone else]," explained Kodadek. "This enables new disease biomarker detection." Additionally, by using these peptoid hits to "fish" for disease-specific antibodies, the system enables disease-specific antibody detection without first knowing the antibodies' natural binding targets.

A Diagnostic Revolution

Using this technology, the group identified several peptoids that bound exclusively to antibodies in NMO patient blood serum and not healthy patients or patients with similar diseases, including multiple sclerosis, lupus, Alzheimer's disease and narcolepsy. At least one of the peptoids bound to an antibody that is well known to be associated with NMO.

The study builds on technology that the group successfully used to identify disease markers in mouse models for multiple sclerosis, introduced in a January 2011 publication in the journal Cell. "[Our latest study] is proof positive that our technology works in complex human systems as well," explained Kodadek.

Kodadek noted the new study also introduced a technical advance that increases the technology's utility, significantly improving the peptoid library screening process. This step initially involved the time-consuming and painstakingly tedious task of removing peptoids from beads and refixating them to a different solid support, called a microarray.

"This is the first time we screened peptoid libraries directly on the beads [on which they were made] instead of using microarrays," said Bindu Raveendra, PhD, staff scientist who was a first author of the study with postdoctoral researcher Wu Hao. "Previously, we could screen thousands of peptoids at a time; now, we can now screen millions. That just wasn't feasible using microarrays."


'/>"/>

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Scripps Research scientists show how memory B cells stay in class to fight different infections
2. Scripps Florida scientists awarded nearly $1.5 million to develop new approaches to treat cancer
3. Clinical trials start for stroke drug developed by Scripps Research, USC, and ZZ Biotech
4. Scripps Research scientists devise powerful new method for finding therapeutic antibodies
5. Scripps Research Institute scientists show protein linked to hunger also implicated in alcoholism
6. Scripps Research Institute receives $20 million to shed light on HIV drug resistance
7. Scripps studies show community-based diabetes programs are key to lowered costs and improved care
8. 2 Scripps Research Institute scientists honored by American Chemical Society
9. Scripps Research Institute study points to potential new therapies for cancer and other diseases
10. Scripps Florida scientists uncover a novel cooperative effort to stop cancer spread
11. Scripps Florida scientist awarded $2.5 million to study inner workings of memory formation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scripps Research study underlines potential of new technology to diagnose disease
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... ... Twenty years ago it was revolutionary: enabling the people who hear distressing voices ... But this approach has proven transformative, both for people who hear voices and for ... is used around the world, but it still lags in the United States. , ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... May 31, 2016 , ... ... particular advertising campaigns, to monitor the performance of sales and support staff, and ... and revenue. The software allows customers to record, transcribe, route, document, and report ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... , ... May 31, 2016 , ... Like jewels in ... clients already know – London is home to Ontario’s leading day spa and one ... visionary Fayez Tamba began with a unique concept to combine spa services with ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... , ... May 31, 2016 , ... Spectrum Aquatics has ... new lift has been designed and built with the user in mind. , “Over ... consultants have informed us that an ADA 400 lbs lift is a necessary requirement ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... ... TeaZa® Energy, LLC announces the launch of a new limited edition ... The new flavor—Tropical TeaZa? Energy—will be available to customers exclusively online starting today, ... is best described as a juicy, taste bud takeover. A mouthwatering wave of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/31/2016)... , May 31, 2016 ... and Annotate Content From Elsevier,s ScienceDirect Database ... scientific, technical and medical information products and services, ... Berlin -based scientific collaboration platform PaperHive to enable ... over 12 million articles on ScienceDirect , ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ZIONA, Israel , May ... regenerative medicine company utilizing its proprietary plant-based rhCollagen technology ... received authorization from the Chief Scientist of ... 50% of its NIS 12 million development project for ... measurably higher than last year,s authorized grant, which totaled ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... -- 194 Mitgliedsstaaten verpflichten sich ... viraler Hepatitis    Am 28. Mai ... Hepatitis bis 2030 zu eliminieren. Bei der ... sich die Staaten einstimmig dafür entschieden, die erste ... Strategy) zu verabschieden, was das bisher weltweit größte ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: