Navigation Links
Scientists show 'swamp gas' protects blood vessels from complications of diabetes
Date:8/2/2011

221.10.254.64

GALVESTON, Texas Hydrogen sulfide is a foul-smelling gas with an odor resembling that of rotten eggs. Sometimes called "swamp gas," this toxic substance is generally associated with decaying vegetation, sewers and noxious industrial emissions. And as odd as it may seem it also plays a critical role in protecting blood vessels from the complications of diabetes, according to a new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

In the last few years, work from several laboratories has shown that hydrogen sulfide is produced by the body in small amounts, and that this gas plays important roles in the circulatory system. In their new paper, published in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the UTMB researchers describe experiments with human endothelial cells (cells from the innermost layer of blood vessels) and diabetic rats that demonstrate the importance of hydrogen sulfide levels in determining whether diabetes will lead to blood vessel complications.

Dr. Szabo's team started by exposing endothelial cells to sugar at a concentration that mimicked a level found in the blood vessels of someone with diabetes. "Upon exposure to such high sugar levels, the cells started to produce increasing amounts of highly reactive toxic free radicals, and as a consequence, they began to die," said Dr. Csaba Szabo, a UTMB professor and the paper's lead author. "Low hydrogen sulfide levels accelerated this process, while constant replacement of hydrogen sulfide protected the cells against the toxic effects of high sugar."

The researchers went on to show that diabetic rats have lower levels of hydrogen sulfide in their circulatory systems than other animals. Furthermore, the team showed that treating diabetic rats for a month with hydrogen sulfide improved the function of their blood vessels.

"The loss of endothelial cell function in diabetes is a first step that leads to many complications, such as eye disease, heart disease, kidney disease, foot disease and others," Szabo said. "The observation that hydrogen sulfide can control an early checkpoint in all of these processes may open the door for new therapies."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Kelly
jpkelly@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists receive funding boost to further research into disease mechanisms of Alzheimer’s
2. Scientists ID Gene Linked to Syndrome Behind Elephant Man Disease
3. Scientists developing new therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer
4. UT Southwestern scientists discover new pathway to potential therapies for advanced prostate cancer
5. Scientists Close in on Origins of Psoriasis, Eczema
6. Hebrew U. scientists identify molecular basis for DNA breakage
7. Scientists Spot Possible Target in Ovarian Cancer
8. 7 in 1 blow: Scientists discover DNA regions influencing prostate cancer risk
9. Gold nanoparticles bring scientists closer to a treatment for cancer
10. Scientists identify order of mutations that lead to cancer
11. Scientists discover new molecular pathway involved in wound-healing and temperature sensation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... The Margarian Law Firm has ... contents of its ginger ale for allegedly containing no ginger. Dr. Pepper produces the ... Group, Inc., plaintiff Gegham Margaryan alleges Canada Dry Ginger Ale claims on its bottle ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... students improve their chances of acceptance to a residency in a United States ... earned degrees outside the U.S. , According to data released by the ECFMG®, ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... 21, 2017 , ... West Dermatology is pleased to announce the newest addition ... 2017, Ms. Vu will join West Dermatology’s large network of medical and cosmetic dermatology ... cancer , and more. She graduated from the University of Florida College of Medicine ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... , ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... why concussion rates are on the rise, say researchers presenting their work at ... Toronto, Ontario, Canada. , “The combination of evaluating the patterns of change in ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 20, 2017 , ... ... bone marrow cancer that progresses rapidly without treatment. Newly diagnosed patients face intense ... chance of reoccurrence and relapse. With such a challenging diagnosis that requires ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/5/2017)... MINNEAPOLIS , July 5, 2017 Pace Analytical, a company of ... announcing today that they have acquired ESC Lab Sciences, further solidifying their position ... the United States . ... Steve Vanderboom- President and CEO of Pace Analytical ... of ESC Lab Sciences out of Mt Juliet, TN , ...
(Date:7/1/2017)... -- Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZBH) today ... be broadcast live over the Internet on Thursday, July 27, ... the quarterly results will be made available at 7:30 a.m. ... The live audio webcast can be accessed via Zimmer Biomet,s ... archived for replay following the conference call. ...
(Date:6/30/2017)... Medical (AVACEN) announced the publication of new research in the peer-reviewed ... AVACEN Treatment Method to significantly reduce the widespread pain ... ... ... 200 to 400 million people worldwide according to The National Fibromyalgia ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: