Navigation Links
Scientists show 'swamp gas' protects blood vessels from complications of diabetes
Date:8/2/2011

221.10.254.64

GALVESTON, Texas Hydrogen sulfide is a foul-smelling gas with an odor resembling that of rotten eggs. Sometimes called "swamp gas," this toxic substance is generally associated with decaying vegetation, sewers and noxious industrial emissions. And as odd as it may seem it also plays a critical role in protecting blood vessels from the complications of diabetes, according to a new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

In the last few years, work from several laboratories has shown that hydrogen sulfide is produced by the body in small amounts, and that this gas plays important roles in the circulatory system. In their new paper, published in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the UTMB researchers describe experiments with human endothelial cells (cells from the innermost layer of blood vessels) and diabetic rats that demonstrate the importance of hydrogen sulfide levels in determining whether diabetes will lead to blood vessel complications.

Dr. Szabo's team started by exposing endothelial cells to sugar at a concentration that mimicked a level found in the blood vessels of someone with diabetes. "Upon exposure to such high sugar levels, the cells started to produce increasing amounts of highly reactive toxic free radicals, and as a consequence, they began to die," said Dr. Csaba Szabo, a UTMB professor and the paper's lead author. "Low hydrogen sulfide levels accelerated this process, while constant replacement of hydrogen sulfide protected the cells against the toxic effects of high sugar."

The researchers went on to show that diabetic rats have lower levels of hydrogen sulfide in their circulatory systems than other animals. Furthermore, the team showed that treating diabetic rats for a month with hydrogen sulfide improved the function of their blood vessels.

"The loss of endothelial cell function in diabetes is a first step that leads to many complications, such as eye disease, heart disease, kidney disease, foot disease and others," Szabo said. "The observation that hydrogen sulfide can control an early checkpoint in all of these processes may open the door for new therapies."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Kelly
jpkelly@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists receive funding boost to further research into disease mechanisms of Alzheimer’s
2. Scientists ID Gene Linked to Syndrome Behind Elephant Man Disease
3. Scientists developing new therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer
4. UT Southwestern scientists discover new pathway to potential therapies for advanced prostate cancer
5. Scientists Close in on Origins of Psoriasis, Eczema
6. Hebrew U. scientists identify molecular basis for DNA breakage
7. Scientists Spot Possible Target in Ovarian Cancer
8. 7 in 1 blow: Scientists discover DNA regions influencing prostate cancer risk
9. Gold nanoparticles bring scientists closer to a treatment for cancer
10. Scientists identify order of mutations that lead to cancer
11. Scientists discover new molecular pathway involved in wound-healing and temperature sensation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... Advanced Inc., a leading provider of ... Bice, CPA, MBA to serve as Advanced Inc.’s Chief Financial Officer, effective December 1, ... Jason brings extensive financial and operational leadership experience to Advanced Inc. He began his ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... The annual time frame to change Medicare health ... is ending December 7th. Currently-enrolled Medicare beneficiaries who are looking to switch from their ... D) need to make changes during this period order for their new policy to ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... an inspirational interview of two ostomy patients, standing as living proof that attitude ... suffer from digestive diseases and issues that spike around the holidays. This campaign ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... "Cardiovascular Health" in USA Today, which covers the innovative treatments, therapeutic technologies, and ... maintaining fulfilling lives. “We are prolonging life 6 years in the last 3 ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) the world's ... to offer robotic imaging to veterinary medicine is sponsoring the appearance of Millennia, ... American Association of Equine Practitioners 62nd Annual Convention from December 4-6, 2016 in ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... , Dec. 2, 2016  LifeVac, the revolutionary ... included in the Emergency Response Training and Support Services ... excited to have LifeVac become part of the ERTSS ... Founder and CEO of LifeVac. "Having an established network ... and effectively will help leverage our efforts to spread ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... India , December 2, 2016 ... report "In Vitro Diagnostics/IVD Market by Product (Instruments, ... Hematology), Application (Diabetes, Oncology, Cardiology, Nephrology, Infectious Diseases) ... global market is valued at USD 60.22 Billion ... at a CAGR of 5.5% during the forecast ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... 2, 2016 In the first ever attempt ... those derived from C. sativa, the Hebrew University in ... Napoli Federico II , the Universita` del Piemonte Orientale ... critical, integrated and unified inventory of phytocannabinoids of different ... on the remarkable chemical and structural diversity of phytocannabinoids. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: