Navigation Links
Scientists reveal DNA-enzyme interaction with first ever real time footage
Date:9/17/2007

For the first time scientists have been able to film, in real time, the nanoscale interaction of an enzyme and a DNA strand from an attacking virus. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have used a revolutionary Scanning Atomic Force Microscope in Japan to produce amazing footage of a protective enzyme unravelling the DNA of a virus trying to infect a bacterial host.

The film is available to view at: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/media/pressreleases/video_enzyme_unravelling_dna.html

The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), will improve our understanding of how enzymes interact with DNA at a nanoscale but also has marked implications for scientists studying DNA repair, and could help in the search for cancer treatments.

Working with researchers in Edinburgh, Japan and India, the Cambridge team used a state-of-the-art microscope, only three of which exist in the world, and a technique known as fast-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM). Before now, scientists could only make assumptions as to how proteins and DNA interact based on indirect evidence but this new window on a fundamental biological process gives them the opportunity to view how the interaction actually occurs.

Dr Robert Henderson, who led the Cambridge research, explains: This is the first time that such a process has been seen in real time. To be able see these nano-mechanisms as they are really happening is incredibly exciting. We can actually see the enzyme threading through a loop in the viruss DNA in order to lock on to and break it, a process known as DNA cleavage.

The microscope and new techniques give us a clear view of the molecular interactions between proteins and DNA that we could only previously interpret indirectly. The indirect methods require scientists to make assumptions to interpret their data, and video footage like this can help to provide a more direct understanding of what is really happening.

Standard technology for filming on this scale can only produce one image frame every 8 minutes. However, our new work allows one frame per 500 or fewer, milliseconds.

The footage shows a bacterial type III restriction enzyme attaching itself to the DNA of a virus, in order to break the DNA before the virus has the chance to infect the bacterium. However, this could also provide a model for understanding how other enzymes and DNA, in any type of organism, including humans, interact.

This helps us understand how enzymes recognise which bit of a DNA strand to latch onto, which is important in understanding how proteins repair damaged DNA. In the long term, this could help in the search for cancer treatments, as cancer sometimes occurs where DNA is damaged but enzymes do not behave correctly in order to repair it.

Steve Visscher, interim BBSRC Chief Executive, said: BBSRC strongly supports the development of new tools and resources and this study clearly highlights the significance of cutting-edge technologies to bioscience research. It is essential that bioscientists can draw upon technologies from the physical and engineering sciences to improve their understanding of biological processes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Matt Goode
press.office@bbsrc.ac.uk
01-793-413-299
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Nobel Prize for Medicine shared by Three scientists
2. Scientists plan human cloning clinic in the United States
3. Scientists crack mechanism of Leptin-Obesity Hormone
4. Scientists use plant hormones to fight cancer
5. American scientists alter gene makeup of babies
6. Expose on eating disorders!! Scientists trace “brain’s eating control center pathway”
7. Scientists found ancient Human Germ Killer
8. Scientists locate key hormone involved in appetite control
9. Scientists open the book of life
10. Electronic nose by Italian scientists
11. Scientists review SARS
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... pilot study of ActiGraph’s CentrePoint Data Hub in a sample of ... of clinical-grade wearable activity and sleep monitoring solutions for the global scientific community. ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... and advanced nutraceutical supplements, through its Nova Skin Sciences division, recently announced the ... of a moisturizer with the power of an anti-aging concentrate. , ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Semrock’s highly popular ... premier online modeling resource for fluorescence microscopists and optical system designers, enabling The ... 5 years spanning the globe, SearchLight has become a tremendously popular tool for ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... 27, 2017 , ... The Incentive Research Foundation is pleased ... Guide," a groundbreaking analysis of how behavioral economics can be applied to the ... IRR programs, the report highlights proven behavioral economics approaches and the powerful role ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... , ... April 27, 2017 , ... ... husband Dan Gasby the 2017 Public Leadership in Neurology Award (PLINA). The couple ... professional athlete Tedy Bruschi, Vice President Walter Mondale, actor Michael J. Fox and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... Outlook, Growth Trends, Key Players, Competitive Strategies and Forecasts, 2014 ... ... US$ 7,167.6 Mn in 2015, and is expected to reach ... 5.6% from 2016 to 2024. The global ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 2017 Cardiology devices segment is anticipated to reach ... The Cardiology Devices segment is likely to create absolute $ ... 2018 over 2017. By the end of 2027, Cardiology Devices ... US$ 700 Mn, expanding at a CAGR of 18.4% over ... Asia Pacific reprocessed medical devices market in ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... Tenn. and DALLAS , April 19, 2017 ... announced that the first patients in Nashville ... device in the Lower Esophageal Sphincter Stimulation for GERD ... implantable device designed to provide long-term reflux control by ... GERD affects nearly 65 million people in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: