Navigation Links
Scientists reprogram triple-negative breast cancer cells to respond to tamoxifen
Date:7/8/2010

Using a small molecule decoy, investigators funded by the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation have managed to block protein interactions and induce epigenetic reprogramming in human and mouse breast cancer cells, essentially changing the gene expression of breast cancer cells to behave in a more normal manner. The research illustrates what may perhaps become an effective targeted epigenetic therapy in breast cancer. Interestingly, the targeted treatment showed exciting results in triple-negative breast cancer cells, reverting their function and appearance, and sensitizing them to tamoxifen and retinoids.

By introducing a small peptide, called the SID decoy, to interfere with protein binding in the Sin 3 PAH2 domain, scientists reduced the growth of triple-negative cancer cells by 80 percent. The decoy also blocked cancer cell invasion, which may shed light on preventing metastasis. The study was published in the June 29 print edition of the journal of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer more commonly diagnosed in young women, African-American women and women with BRCA-1 mutated cancers, said medical oncologist Samuel Waxman, M.D., the study's senior author. Currently, the only treatment options that women with triple-negative breast cancer have are radiation therapy, surgery and chemotherapy. Women with triple-negative breast cancer do not respond to hormonal therapy or Herceptin and have a higher recurrence rate after chemotherapy.

"Hopefully, this breakthrough research means we can expand treatment options for women with triple-negative breast cancer and give them a chance at anti-estrogen hormonal therapy," said Dr. Waxman, a professor in the department of Hematology and Oncology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City and the scientific director of the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation.

Arthur Zelent, Ph.D., a co-author of the study, said researchers plan to investigate small molecules that are predicted to have the same effect as the decoy peptide. "This could form the basis for a new class of targeted, epigenetic drugs in breast cancer," said Dr. Zelent, a team leader at The Institute of Cancer Research in the United Kingdom.

Elizabeth Woolfe, the executive director of the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation, said though the study's results are too preliminary to make a clinical impact for cancer survivors today, she added, "The findings offer encouraging results that could lead to other promising research and the potential for new therapeutics for women facing triple-negative breast cancer."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jenny Song
jsong@waxmancancer.org
212-867-4502
Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists Pinpoint Area of Brain That Fears Losing Money
2. Scientists Discover How HIV Is Transmitted Between Men
3. Prevention Is Key Research Goal for Premature Babies, Scientists Say
4. Scientists Discover Molecular Pathway for Organ Tissue Regeneration and Repair
5. Scientists find donut-shaped structure of enzyme involved in energy metabolism
6. Neuroscientists reveal new links that regulate brain electrical activity
7. Two UCSF Scientists to Receive Prestigious Dementia Research Honor
8. Johns Hopkins scientists develop personalized blood tests for cancer using whole genome sequencing
9. Scientists Spot Genetic Fingerprints of Individual Cancers
10. Scientists Unravel Mysteries of Intelligence
11. MSU scientists develop more effective method of predicting lead-poisoning risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/18/2017)... Oaks, CA (PRWEB) , ... July 18, 2017 , ... ... Ph.D. scientist extracted cannabis oils, announced today that at the WORLDZ Summit, taking place ... will be speaking on the therapeutic benefits of medical cannabis for both pediatric and ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... ... July 18, 2017 , ... Doctors ... partners with the best medical professionals who offer the most effective and efficient ... professional in their network, ensuring that each patient receives prompt and courteous service, ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... Fort Worth, Texas (PRWEB) , ... July 19, ... ... a 2017 Gold Winner for it’s Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative in the prestigious ... world’s best in leadership, innovation, organizational performance, new products and services, CEO case ...
(Date:7/17/2017)... ... July 17, 2017 , ... McGraw Family Pledges $3 ... and Train Next Generation of Healthcare Clinicians , NORWALK, Connecticut – July 17, ... its legacy of investing in community health by pledging up to $3 million in ...
(Date:7/17/2017)... ... 17, 2017 , ... Western University of Health Sciences has ... Education for the sixth consecutive year, and also made the Honor Roll for ... Lebanon, Oregon, was recognized in seven categories: Collaborative Governance, Compensation & Benefits, Job ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/5/2017)... MANCHESTER, England , July 5, 2017 ... the perfect answer as physics and manufacturing combine to progress ... the thyroid, existing SPECT systems are unable to accurately quantify ... consequence, only limited information regarding the success of this radiotherapy ... ...
(Date:6/30/2017)... Md. , June 30, 2017 In ... since the start of May, at least ten diagnostic ... include private investments, public offerings and a loan facility.  ... million to almost $80 million.  Kalorama Information provides a ... of its Diagnostics Knowledge Center. ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ROTTERDAM, Netherlands and LAGUNA HILLS, ... announced the presentation of new data that validate the ... to risk stratify patients with multiple myeloma (MM). In ... of the European Hematology Association (EHA) in ... prognostic value of MMprofiler for identifying high-risk elderly patients. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: