Navigation Links
Scientists measure how energy is spent in martial arts

Two judo fighters face off, one in a white judogi (the traditional judo uniform) and one in blue. They reach for each other's shoulders and lock arms, in what looks like an awkward dance, before the fighter in blue throws his opponent head-over-feet onto the mat.

Judo and mixed martial arts have become increasingly popular over the past few years and scientists have taken note. The two fighters were actually filmed as part of a science experiment that demonstrates how researchers can quantify exactly how the athletes are spending their energy. The video will be published in JoVE, the Journal of Visualized Experiments, the only peer reviewed, PubMed-indexed science journal to publish all of its content in both text and video format.

Previously, researchers have only been able to study predictable sports that are easy to replicate in the laboratory, such as running. With this new method, scientists will be able to study the team and individual sports that have previously been neglected.

"Each sport has specific characteristics which confer different metabolic demands to them," said paper-author Dr. Emerson Franchini. "One of the most important aspects of the metabolic demand is the relative contribution of the energy systems."

Three energy systems are used in exercise: the aerobic metabolism, which uses oxygen to convert nutrients into energy; lactic anaerobic metabolism, which doesn't require oxygen and makes energy exclusively from carbohydrates, with lactic acid as a by-product; and alactic anaerobic metabolism, which makes energy without oxygen and doesn't produce lactic acid.

In this article, the researchers chose to study judo, a complex and unpredictable sport. To figure out the relative contributions of each energy system, the researchers recorded the participants' resting oxygen consumption, and used a portable gas analyzer (which looks a little bit like a mini jet-pack) to measure exercise oxygen consumption. The researchers took these measures, as well as post-exercise oxygen consumption, rest lactate concentration, and peak lactate concentration post-exercise, and used various mathematical formulas to determine how much each individual energy system contributed.

"One amazing aspect of this method is that it can provide information regarding the energy demands of specific components within a sport," said JoVE Content Director, Dr. Aaron Kolski-Andreaco. "For example, the relative contributions of the energy systems can be calculated for different Judo throws, and the authors elegantly demonstrate this in their article."

As the authors point out, the problems with assessing unpredictable or team sports in the laboratory has meant that less attention has been paid to those sports by scientists. They hope that this method will help change that.


Contact: Katherine Scott
617-765-4367 x301
The Journal of Visualized Experiments

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists Pinpoint Area of Brain That Fears Losing Money
2. Scientists Discover How HIV Is Transmitted Between Men
3. Prevention Is Key Research Goal for Premature Babies, Scientists Say
4. Scientists Discover Molecular Pathway for Organ Tissue Regeneration and Repair
5. Scientists find donut-shaped structure of enzyme involved in energy metabolism
6. Neuroscientists reveal new links that regulate brain electrical activity
7. Two UCSF Scientists to Receive Prestigious Dementia Research Honor
8. Johns Hopkins scientists develop personalized blood tests for cancer using whole genome sequencing
9. Scientists Spot Genetic Fingerprints of Individual Cancers
10. Scientists Unravel Mysteries of Intelligence
11. MSU scientists develop more effective method of predicting lead-poisoning risk
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Scientists measure how energy is spent in martial arts
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The Foundation ... cancer education and prevention—is joining forces with the award-winning creator and writer of ... on December 7, 2015 at the Union League of Philadelphia. , The ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... While powdered supplements and drinks can reduce food preparation ... from Chesterfield, Va., has found an easy to keep track of the scoop. , ... powdered contents in a canister or other container handy and readily accessible. As such, ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Since ... websites specializing in independent living, assisted living and all other retirement options. Support ... awareness and research remains a top priority. , So it’s no ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The successful filing of an Investigational New ... is so important to this key industry segment, Regis Technologies has decided to sponsor ... December 4th at 11am EST. , Federal law does not allow new drugs to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... SIMmersion’s ability ... to the medical schools of the future. To reach an audience of key ... 2015 ChangeMedEd conference in Chicago, organized by the American Medical Association. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015   Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG ... first MRI guided user interface and automatic scan parameter ... MR Conditional implants, such as knee and hip replacements, ... Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA) . The ... confidence of this growing patient population. ScanWise Implant adds ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... PUNE, India , November 30, 2015 ... in 2014, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of ... was valued at USD 135.6 million in 2014, and ... to 2020. --> According to the new Market Research ... Minimally invasive, non-invasive), By End User (Hospitals, ambulatory care, others) - ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... the Six Months Ended 30 September 2015 2014RestatedChange%Turnover 545,575 , 518,852 ... , 384,242 , 9.8 Hospital Management ... , (18.3) Medical Insurance Administration Service Income , ... Medical Devices and Accessories Sales , 89,645 , ... 2,822 , 2,917 , (3.3) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: