Navigation Links
Scientists identify 'gatekeepers' of breast cancer transition to invasive disease
Date:5/5/2008

Scientists have made a significant discovery that clarifies a previously poorly understood key event in the progression of breast cancer. The research, published by Cell Press in the May issue of the journal Cancer Cell, highlights the importance of the microenvironment in regulating breast tumor progression and suggests that it may be highly beneficial to consider therapies that do not focus solely on the tumor cells but are also targeted to the surrounding tissues.

Progression of breast cancer begins with abnormal epithelial proliferation that progresses into localized carcinoma, called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS); invasive carcinoma; and eventually, metastatic disease. DCIS is believed to be a precursor to invasive ductal carcinoma, but comprehensive molecular profiling studies comparing DCIS and invasive ductal carcinomas have not yielded tumor-stage-specific genetic signatures. These studies have focused mainly on the tumor epithelial cells and have not explored the role of the microenvironment in tumor expression, says lead study author Dr. Kornelia Polyak from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

Dr. Polyak and colleagues explored the involvement of the microenvironment in tumor progression by examining myoepithelial cells, which are known to play a critical role in mammary gland development and to have negative effects on tumor cell growth and invasion. To study the interactions between breast cancer cells and myoepithelial cells, the researchers used a human model of breast tumor progression called MCFDCIS, which forms DCIS-like lesions that spontaneously progress to invasive tumors, a pathology that closely resembles human disease.

Using this model, the researchers observed that normal myoepithelial cells suppress tumor growth and invasion in the absence of detectable genetic changes in the tumor epithelial cells. They went on to identify an intricate network involving TGFb, Hedgehog, cell adhesion, and p63 that appears to play a critical role in myoepithelial cell differentiation. Perturbation of key mediators of these signaling pathways led to a loss of myoepithelial cells and a progression to invasion.

Here, we show that a key event of tumor progression is the disappearance of the myoepithelial cell layer due to defective myoepithelial cell differentiation regulated by intrinsic and microenvironment signals. Thus, myoepithelial cells can be considered gatekeepers of the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition; understanding the pathways that regulate their differentiation may open new venues for cancer therapy and prevention, offers Dr. Polyak.


'/>"/>

Contact: Cathleen Genova
cgenova@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists at Yale provide explanation for how cancer spreads
2. Brookhaven scientists explore brains reaction to potent hallucinogen
3. Scientists Discover How Stomach Tumors Form
4. U.S. Scientists Receive Japan Prize on April 23, 2008
5. Scientists discover a mechanism that can send cells on the road to cancer
6. Scientists identify novel way to prevent cardiac fibrosis
7. Scientists Explore Human Gene Pool With Help From Microsoft Research
8. Scientists obtain anticancer medicines from the elecampe, a wild plant growing in the Mediterranean
9. Jefferson scientists discovery may help explain smoking-pancreatic cancer link
10. With annual deaths from malaria on the rise: Scientists ask where is all the money going?
11. Stem cells and cancer: Scientists investigate a fine balancing act
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/30/2016)... , ... April 30, 2016 , ... Orlando-based Maximized Living ... they go for gold in Rio. Under the care of Maximized Living doctors ... , In an unprecedented showing, Maximized Living is sending the largest contingent of elite ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Since launching its annual volunteer ... serving the footwear industry, has broken all previous participation records in its first ... 23 states during the months of April and May, the 2016 Footwear Cares ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... On Tuesday, ... hospitals across the Southeast, celebrated the signature of Gov. Nathan Deal on SB 258, ... Geoff Duncan (R - Cumming), offers a 70% tax credit to individuals and corporations ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Conditions were ideal for Global Lyme Alliance’s (GLA) ... with sunny skies, a light breeze and temperatures in the 60s. Over 400 runners, ... Run and Walk and 1-mile walk were held to increase awareness about Lyme ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... that student team BioCellection won the $30,000 Perlman Grand Prize of the 2016 ... Gloeckner Undergraduate Award, the Michelson People’s Choice Award, and the Committee Award for ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)...   Acsis , a leading provider of supply ... research and advisory firm IDC has named it a ... Pharmaceutical Track and Trace Software 2016 Vendor Assessment (doc ... of the capabilities and business strategies of 10 vendors ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160427/360791LOGO ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... 27, 2016  Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... for the fiscal second quarter ended March 26, ... $0.24 increased 41.2%, and non-GAAP diluted EPS of ... 5.8% on a reported basis, and 6.3% on ... posted another good quarter, highlighted by 14.6% growth ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... Italy , April 27, 2016 ... linear accelerator (MR-linac) platform will be the focal point ... meeting of the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology, ... Elekta,s MR-linac integrates a state-of-the-art radiotherapy system and a ... physician to clearly see the patient,s anatomy in real ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: