Navigation Links
Scientists find second site for prostate cancer gene

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues who are studying a prostate cancer gene called HNF1B have found a second independent site within the HNF1B gene on chromosome 17 (17q12) increasing the number of genetic variants that may contribute to risk of developing the disease.

After comparing the newly-discovered site with a previously discovered site in the same gene among two large groups of patients in Sweden and at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, "these data strongly suggest that the two sites are genetically independent," said Jianfeng Xu, M.D., Dr. Ph.H., senior researcher on the study.

"We found another genetic variant associated with prostate cancer risk," Xu said. "The more genetic variants we discover, the better off we are. As we find more of these, it improves our ability to predict prostate cancer risk."

Xu, a professor of epidemiology and cancer biology and Director of the Center for Cancer Genomics, reported the results with 30 colleagues in the current on-line version of Nature Genetics.

The researchers conducted what they termed a "fine-mapping study" in the two groups, one called CAPS, from Sweden, that had 2,899 prostate cancer cases and 1,722 control participants, and the Johns Hopkins study that had 1,527 prostate cancer patients and 482 control participants.

They found two separate clusters of prostate-cancer-associated SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), one in a region previously identified and one in a new region. The researchers then worked to see whether the genetic variants were associated with risk of developing the disease. They looked at the same locations in five other large studies of prostate cancer patients and found that prostate cancer risk was higher among men who had the genetic variants. Earlier this year, the same research group reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that genetic variants have a strong cumulative effective. A man with four of the five previously discovered variants has a 400 percent increased risk of developing prostate cancer compared to men with none of the variants.

Xu said that as the number of genetic variants associated with prostate cancer risk continues to mount, it improves the precision of risk prediction. But he predicted that prostate cancer will be found to be polygenic, "not dependent on one gene, but a group of genes."

Prostate cancer risk might be plotted on a bell-shaped curve, with men with a family history of the disease and multiple variants being at the upper end of the curve.

The researchers are exploring another finding, that the HNF1B gene is also associated with diabetes. But if a patient with the HNF1B gene has diabetes, the prostate cancer risk decreases, "We still don't know how," Xu said.


Contact: Jessica Guenzel
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists Track Hourly Changes in Alzheimers Protein
2. Early trigger for type-1 diabetes found in mice, Stanford scientists report
3. Scientists ID Pathway That Makes Antipsychotic Drugs Work
4. UT Southwestern scientists discover leptin can also aid type 1 diabetics
5. Chemical liberated by leaky gut may allow HIV to infect the brain, Einstein scientists find
6. By amplifying cell death signals, scientists make precancerous cells self-destruct
7. NIH scientists find a novel mechanism that controls the development of autoimmunity
8. Scientists use old enemy to K.O. cancer
9. Distinguished Cardiologists and Scientists Honored With 2008 International Academy of Cardiology Award
10. CSHL neuroscientists glimpse how the brain decides what to believe
11. Scientists measure connection between the built environment and obesity in baby boomers
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Experts from the American Institutes for Research ... June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. , AIR experts ... planning, healthcare costs and patient and family engagement. , AIR researchers will be ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... "With 30 hand-drawn hand gesture animations, FCPX users can easily customize each ... Film Studios. , ProHand Cartoon’s package transforms over 1,300 hand-drawn pictures into hand ... select a ProHand generator and drag it above media or text in the Final ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (PRWEB) , ... June 25, ... ... to helping both athletes and non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented ... for the Oklahoma City area —Johnson is one of the first doctors to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published June 14 ... The article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking to ... operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, Beverly ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son ... lash out at his family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t ... would use it. He would throw rocks at my other children and say he was ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Calif. , June 23, 2016 Any dentist ... many challenges of the current process. Many of them do ... of the technical difficulties and high laboratory costs involved. And ... to offer it at such a high cost that the ... it. Dr. Parsa Zadeh , founder of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets has ... Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report to ... report contains up to date financial data derived from varied ... major trends with potential impact on the market during the ... segmentation which comprises of sub markets, regional and country level ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- , , , WHEN: , ... , , , LOCATION: , , , Online, with free ... EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , Frost & Sullivan,s Global Vice President ... Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and Unmesh Lal, Program Manager , ... is witnessing an exceptional era. Several new demand spaces, such as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: