Navigation Links
Scientists discover cells critical to childhood leukemia
Date:1/21/2010

Scientists at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and the University of Melbourne in Australia have discovered the cells that cause a common type of childhood leukaemia T cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (T-ALL). Targeting of these cells may lead to improved treatments for this disease and help prevent relapse.

The team, led by Dr Matthew McCormack and Dr David Curtis of the Rotary Bone Marrow Research Laboratories and the University's Department of Medicine at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, made the discovery whilst studying mice prone to developing this leukaemia.

The results have been published online today by the prestigious international journal Science.

The team found that with irradiation treatment in animal models, over 99 per cent of cells in the thymus were killed, but these stem cell-like cells persisted and rapidly recovered. This suggests that these cells may survive therapy and be responsible for relapsed disease following treatment.

Currently, children with T-ALL are given extended therapy over two to three years in an attempt to stop a relapse. More targeted therapy on the thymus cells could reduce the length and toxicity of treatment and prevent relapse.

Dr McCormack, a leading international expert on childhood leukaemia, said: "The cellular origins of this leukaemia are not well understood. Our discovery that these cells are similar to normal stem cells explains why they are capable of surviving for long periods. It also explains why they are remarkably resistant to treatment."

Approximately 50 new cases of T-ALL are diagnosed every year in Australia, two thirds of these in children or adolescents. Adults also contract T-ALL, and the majority succumb to resistant or relapsed disease.

Dr Curtis, a Clinical Haematologist and head of the Leukaemia Research Program at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, said: "The identification of these cells provides an important target for the development and testing of new treatments for patients with T cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia."

The team will now focus on novel treatments capable of killing these cells, which may lead to clinical trials within the next five years.


'/>"/>

Contact: Rebecca Scott
rebeccas@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-440-181
University of Melbourne
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. New prion protein discovered by Canadian scientists may offer insight into mad cow disease
2. Scientists Probe Sepsis Deadly Secrets
3. Scientists puzzled by severe allergic reaction to cancer drug in the middle Southern US
4. Scientists Develop Natural Protection for Stored Foods
5. Scientists detect presence of marburg virus in african fruit bats
6. Scientists Spot Brains Free Will Center
7. Scientists ID Likely Culprit in Popcorn Lung
8. Scientists explain how insulin secreting cells maintain their glucose sensitivity
9. Scripps Research scientists shed new light on how antibodies fight HIV
10. Scientists, physicians present latest findings in personalized cancer treatment and prevention
11. Scientists demonstate link between genetic variant and effectiveness of smoking cessation meds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... The Rhode Island Quality ... Management Alerts and Dashboards, an innovative new service enabling healthcare providers to proactively ... Management Alerts and Dashboards provide near real-time data about patients admitted to and/or ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... ... By scoring 100% for fiscal management and accountability, the Arthritis National Research ... Charity Navigator, validating ANRF's work as a top charity in America. , This achievement ... earns ANRF a spot on their “ 10 Charities Worth Watching ” list as ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... ... Studies show evidence that carotenoids and antioxidants derived either from the diet or from ... how often do ophthalmologists and optometrists in Sweden recommend the use of nutritional supplements, ... symptoms of AMD? A study published recently in Dove Medical Press journal, ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Dr. Ran Y. ... has recently begun offering three new minimally invasive procedures to patients who want ... reducing downtime, Dr. Rubinstein is excited to bring microneedling, microneedling facials, and platelet ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Everybody has their own personal preference when it comes to ... some people don't like it at all. FindaTopDoc took a look at what makes ... can give readers a taste of their deepest, darkest fantasies and has the ability ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/19/2017)... , June 19, 2017  Researchers from DRUGSCAN ® ... they will host a live, complimentary webinar titled, "Untangling ... benchtop to the real world" on Wednesday June 28, ... This webinar will feature interviews with recreational ... into the manipulation techniques abusers use to prepare opioid ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... , June 14, 2017  ivWatch LLC, a ... effectiveness of intravenous (IV) therapy, is pleased to announce ... category of Nonsurgical Hospital Supplies and Equipment at the ... program for the medtech industry. The award was presented ... Jacob K. Javits Center in New York ...
(Date:6/13/2017)... , June 13, 2017 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. ... today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ... 3, 2015 relating to its Zhejiang, China ... "The successful clearance of the Warning Letter ... manufacturing facility is a measure of the progress we have ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: