Navigation Links
Scientists develop vaccine that successfully attacks breast cancer in mice
Date:12/13/2011

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Arizona (http://www.mayoclinic.org/arizona/) and the University of Georgia (UGA) have developed a vaccine that dramatically reduces tumors in a mouse model that mimics 90 percent of human breast and pancreatic cancer cases including those that are resistant to common treatments.

The vaccine, described this week in the early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (http://www.pnas.org/), reveals a promising new strategy for treating cancers that share the same distinct carbohydrate signature, including ovarian and colorectal cancers.

When cells become cancerous, the sugars on their surface proteins undergo distinct changes that set them apart from healthy cells. For decades, scientists have tried to enable the immune system to recognize those differences to destroy cancer cells rather than normal cells. But since cancer cells originate within the body, the immune system generally doesn't recognize them as foreign and therefore doesn't mount an attack.

The researchers used unique mice developed by Sandra Gendler, Ph.D. (http://mayoresearch.mayo.edu/mayo/research/gendler_lab/), the David F. and Margaret T. Grohne Professor of Therapeutics for Cancer Research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and co-senior author on the study. Like humans, the mice develop tumors that overexpress a protein known as MUC1 (http://discoverysedge.mayo.edu/de08-2-ctsa-gendler/index.cfm) on the surface of their cells. The tumor-associated MUC1 protein is adorned with a distinctive, shorter set of carbohydrates that set it apart from healthy cells.

"This is the first time that a vaccine has been developed that trains the immune system to distinguish and kill cancer cells based on their different sugar structures on proteins such as MUC1," Dr. Gendler says. "We are especially excited about the fact that MUC1 was recently recognized by the National Cancer Institute as one of the three most important tumor proteins for vaccine development."

"This vaccine elicits a very strong immune response," says study co-senior author Geert-Jan Boons, Ph.D., Franklin Professor of Chemistry and a researcher in the UGA Cancer Center and its Complex Carbohydrate Research Center in Athens.

Dr. Gendler says MUC1 is found on more than 70 percent of all cancers that kill. Many cancers, such as breast, pancreatic, ovarian and multiple myeloma, express MUC1 with the shorter carbohydrate on more than 90 percent of cases.

She explains that when cancer occurs, the architecture of the cell changes and MUC1 is produced at high levels, promoting tumor formation. A vaccine directed against MUC1 has tremendous potential to prevent recurrence or as a prophylactic in patients at high risk for particular cancers, Dr. Gendler says. A vaccine also can be used together with standard therapy such as chemotherapy in cancers that cannot be cured by surgery, such as pancreatic cancer.

For the immune system to recognize MUC1 on the tumor cells, it required a special vaccine that had three parts. One part tricks the body into thinking that the cancer cell is a bacterial infection, one part stimulates an antibody response, and one part stimulates a lymphocyte response. If any of the three components were omitted, the vaccine did not work as well.

Dr. Boons notes that MUC1 is also overexpressed in 90 percent of the subset of patients who are not responsive to hormonal therapy, such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, or the drug Herceptin. These so-called triple-negative tumors are extremely aggressive and difficult to treat, Dr. Boons says, and a new treatment option is urgently needed.

"In the U.S. alone, there are 35,000 patients diagnosed every year whose tumors are triple-negative," Dr. Boons says. "So we might have a therapy for a large group of patients for which there is currently no drug therapy aside from chemotherapy."

Dr. Gendler and her colleagues are currently testing the vaccine's effectiveness against human cancer cells in culture and are planning to assess toxicity. If all goes well, phase I clinical trials to test the safety of the vaccine could begin by late 2013.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim McVeigh
mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu
480-301-4222
Mayo Clinic
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists develop vaccine that attacks breast cancer in mice
2. Scientists discover new way to target cancer
3. Survey reveals scientists have trouble accessing human embryonic stem cell lines
4. Scientists capture single cancer molecules at work
5. Scientists identify strategies to conquer lifestyle and genetic factors related to chronic diseases
6. Scientists discover likely cause of most common involuntary movement disorder
7. Scientists ID Gene That Predicts Chances of Cold Sores
8. Scientists discover anti-inflammatory polyphenols in apple peels
9. Scientists identify key area that could sever communication between brain and heart in disease
10. Scientists identify defect in brain cell channel that may cause autism-like syndrome
11. Scientists Reveal Monarch Butterfly Genome
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... The narrative in “ ... Erik Schanssema ’s true account of his paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he ... and his attempts to overcome them. , Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at ... concerning this present generation. Yisrayl makes an astounding statement when he says that ... explains that the Bible details the current times so plainly that anyone should be ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... The Radiology Business Management Association will select the 2017 ... Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs conference, held this year from March 5 to ... are given out in five categories. They are:, ,     Patient Marketing, ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... Castle Farms, the celebrated ... Giveaway, with the winning couple announced on Feb. 14, 2017, on Facebook. The ... local vendors: A Matter of Taste, Ryan Rousseau Enterprises, A Touch of Spring ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... The 89th Academy Awards will be celebrated this weekend, ... Policy Center Bunkum Award. We invite you to enjoy our 11th annual tongue-in-cheek “salute” ... is the Center for American Progress (CAP), for its report, Lessons From State Performance ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Australien, 24. Februar 2017 ITL ... Unternehmen des Gesundheitsbereiches, ist erfreut, für das zum ... dem entsprechenden Vorjahreszeitraum exzellente Ergebnisse vorlegen zu können. ... Aktualisierung zum Wachstum" finden Sie hier . ... Gewinn nach Steuern 2,12 Millionen USD (Dez. 2015: 1,04 Millionen USD; +104 %) ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 2017  The particle counters market is projected ... USD 275.9 million in 2016, at a CAGR ... http://www.reportlinker.com/p04718602-summary/view-report.html The growing pharmaceutical ... and growth in manufacturing industries in emerging nations ... particle counters. On the other hand, technical limitations ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Autism ... to their offering. ... The latest research Autism Spectrum Disorder Drugs Price Analysis and ... global Autism Spectrum Disorder market. The research answers the following ... marketed for Autism Spectrum Disorder and their clinical attributes? How are ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: