Navigation Links
Scientists Snipped HIV Out of Human DNA
Date:7/21/2014

MONDAY, July 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A recently developed molecular tool allowed researchers to remove HIV from cultured human cells in the lab.

The team of scientists at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia said their approach may one day lead to a permanent treatment for HIV. They added that this technique might also be used to develop a vaccine to offer protection against the disease in the future.

"Since HIV-1 is never cleared by the immune system, removal of the virus is required in order to cure the disease," Kamel Khalili, chair of the department of neuroscience at Temple, explained in a university news release.

"It's an exciting discovery, but it's not yet ready to go into the clinic. It's a proof of concept that we're moving in the right direction," added Khalili, who is also director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple.

The study was published online July 21 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The research focused on a type of HIV known as HIV-1. This is the most common type of AIDS-causing HIV worldwide, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus inserts its genetic material into the DNA of human cells, where it remains throughout a person's lifetime.

That means people with HIV-1 must take a drug regimen for the rest of their lives to keep the virus under control. If treatment is stopped, the virus returns.

But, if it were possible to remove HIV's genetic material from human cells, the researchers believe they might be able to rid people of the virus for good.

To do this, the researchers developed a molecular tool that could hunt down HIV-1's genetic material and snip it out of human cells. Once the viral DNA was removed, the cells were able to repair themselves and put loose ends back together. The result: virus-free cells.

This deletion process was successful in several types of human cells known to harbor HIV-1, according to Khalili.

This technique could potentially be used against a variety of other viruses, the study's authors pointed out. They also suggested that the same molecular tools used to remove HIV genetic material might lead to an HIV vaccine. The treated cells, which were armed with the ability to snip out HIV, were resistant to new HIV infection, the study revealed.

There are still many challenges associated with this approach that researchers must overcome before it could be used on people, including how to deliver the agent to every single infected cell. HIV-1 also tends to mutate, the researchers noted. As a result, treatment may need to be individualized to each person.

More than 33 million people around the world have HIV, including more than 1 million in the United States. Each year, 50,000 Americans are infected with the virus, according to the CDC.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides more information on HIV/AIDS.

SOURCE: Temple University Health System, news release, July 21, 2014

--


'/>"/>
Copyright©2014 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists solving the mystery of human consciousness
2. Scientists uncover multiple faces of deadly breast cancer
3. Scientists identify major source of cells defense against oxidative stress
4. Scientists tailor cell surface targeting system to hit organelle ZIP codes
5. Scientists rewrite rulebook on breast cancer in landmark global study
6. Warwick scientists uncover how checkpoint proteins bind chromosomes
7. NIH scientists link quickly spreading gene to Asian MRSA epidemic
8. Joslin scientists identify important mechanism that affects the aging process
9. Scripps Research scientists show how memory B cells stay in class to fight different infections
10. Scientists Map Melanomas Genome
11. A*STAR scientists discover switch to boost anti-viral response to fight infectious diseases
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scientists Snipped HIV Out of Human DNA
(Date:6/25/2016)... Montreal, Canada (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... the pursuit of success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high ... low, risk more than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle Cell Observance Day. In ... benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of Marne, Michigan, has issued ... Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the red blood cells, which can ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... MIAMI, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Florida Trend magazine’s 2016 Legal Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this ... of Florida. , Seven Greenberg Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Inc, makers of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, join The ‘Business for a Fair ... hour by 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to increase at the same rate as ... the wage floor does not erode again, and make future increases more predictable. , The ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Haute Living, is proud to recognize Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent ... “the most beautiful women in the world, and the most handsome men, look ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... --  Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: PULM ), ... today that it was added to the Russell Microcap ... set of U.S. and global equity indexes on June ... for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive Officer Robert Clarke ... in developing drugs for crucial unmet medical needs, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016  MedSource announced today that ... e-clinical software solution of choice.  This latest decision ... value to their clients by offering a state-of-the-art ... relationship establishes nowEDC as the EDC platform of ... full-service clients.  "nowEDC has long been a preferred ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Research ... "Pharmaceutical Excipients Market by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, ... (Oral, Topical, Coating, Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is ... a CAGR of 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: