Navigation Links
Scientists ID a protein that splices and dices genes

SAN ANTONIO, Texas, U.S.A. (Feb. 4, 2010) A novel finding, described today (Feb. 4) on the Science Express Web site by teams from the National Cancer Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and the University of Toronto, offers a clue as to how genes can have what you might call multiple personalities.

Genes are long strings of DNA letters, but they can be cut and spliced to make different proteins, something like the word "Saskatchewan" can have its middle cut out to leave the word "Swan," its front, middle and end deleted to leave the word "skate," or its front and back chopped off to make the word "chew."

Today's discovery reveals that the protein MRG15, which previously had been known to affect cell growth and aging, also directs the gene-splicing machinery. Olivia Pereira-Smith, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology and the Sam and Ann Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, has studied the function of MRG15 for more than 10 years.

As people or animals age, this gene-splicing machinery can go awry, producing nonsense proteins ("Sskt" instead of "Swan," for instance) rather than the proper ones. These aberrant proteins can damage cells, possibly leading to cancer or other diseases of aging. Today's finding thus has potential implications for therapies to treat both cancer and aging, a Texas researcher said.

The Science paper's lead author is Reini F. Luco, Ph.D., a fellow in the laboratory of senior author Dr. Tom Misteli, Ph.D., at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Other co-authors include Kaoru Tominaga, Ph.D., from the UT Health Science Center, and Benjamin J. Benclowe, Ph.D., and Qun S. Pan, Ph.D., from the University of Toronto.

"We've known for three or four years, from other analyses, that this protein was also involved in splicing, but we needed the expertise of Dr. Misteli's lab," Dr. Smith said. "Dr. Luco led the splicing studies on this project."

Dr. Tominaga, a faculty member of the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology and the Barshop Institute in San Antonio, said it may be possible to design cancer drugs to regulate MRG15's activity.


Contact: Will Sansom
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Related medicine news :

1. Breakthrough by Danish scientists in preventing maternal malaria
2. NIH scientists identify maternal and fetal genes that increase preterm birth risk
3. UM School of Medicine scientists find new malaria vaccine is safe and protective in children
4. Gladstone scientists identify target that may reduce complications of obesity
5. Scientists map out regulatory regions of genome, hot spots for diabetes genes
6. Scientists discover enzyme that cleans cancer cells
7. Scientists Decode Brain Cancer Cell Line
8. Scientists show how molecular switch helps pancreatic cancer beat drugs
9. Brain scientists extend map of fear memory formation
10. Scientists Turn Mouse Skin Cells Into Nerve Cells
11. Scientists Find Way to Track Flesh-Eating Bacteria
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), as well as raising public awareness of the ... they need it—presented a third donation of $35,000 to bolster progress at the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... Bunion Bootie , the newest ... of the early holiday shopping season. Starting Wednesday November 25th, Bunion Booties are ... Friday promotional pricing is in addition to any automatic discounts applied when buying ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... Dr. Todd S. Afferica, a noted general dentist in Norcross, GA ... Afferica now uses the BIOLASE WaterLase iPlus 2.0™ in many of his dental procedures. ... traditional cutting tools, such as the scalpel and high-speed drill, which can both cause ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... , ... Charitable giving is at its peak during the holidays. In ... of the year totalling over $358 billion in 2014. With more than 1.5 ... those individuals who want to “give back” during the holidays. , “With so many ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics, consumer health and global clinical supply ... present at the upcoming Clinical Trial Supply East Asia Conference, to be held ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... -- Teledyne DALSA , a Teledyne Technologies company and ... its CMOS X-Ray detector for mammography at the ... 3, at McCormick Place in Chicago . ... imaging will be on display in the South Hall, Booth ... X-Ray detectors is the industry benchmark for high speed imaging ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015  Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: ... Oppenheimer 26th Annual Healthcare Conference on December 8, in ... Susie Lisa , vice president, Investor Relations, will participate ... beginning at approximately 8:35 a.m. ET. --> ... in a 30-minute question-and-answer session with the host analyst ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 2015   Renowned ... deliver s advice and insights on supplements ... More than 50% of Dubai ... to the DHA   femMED launches comprehensive solutions for women ... Dubai residents are not consuming enough to keep themselves ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: