Navigation Links
Scientists ID New Gene Regions Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified 10 new regions of DNA linked to type 2 diabetes, bringing the total number of genes and gene regions associated with the disease to more than 60.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin and does not respond effectively to the insulin it does produce. As a result, glucose levels in the blood can increase unchecked. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to a number of health complications, including heart disease, stroke, nerve damage and blindness.

The international team of researchers said their findings may help experts develop treatments for the condition.

"The 10 gene regions we have shown to be associated with type 2 diabetes are taking us nearer a biological understanding of the disease," said the study's principal investigator Mark McCarthy of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, in a university news release. "It is hard to come up with new drugs for diabetes without first having an understanding of which biological processes in the body to target. This work is taking us closer to that goal."

The study, led by researchers from the University of Oxford, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and the University of Michigan, investigated common genetic variations in DNA that may be linked to type 2 diabetes.

The investigators examined the DNA of nearly 35,000 people with type 2 diabetes and roughly 115,000 people without the disease and found the new gene regions where DNA changes could be linked to people's risk for diabetes. Two of these regions showed different effects depending on gender. One was associated with greater risk for the disease in men, while the other was linked to increased risk in women.

A pattern in the type of genes linked to type 2 diabetes also emerged from the study.

"By looking at all 60 or so gene regions together we can look for signatures of the type of genes that influence the risk of type 2 diabetes," McCarthy said. "We see genes involved in controlling the process of cell growth, division and aging, particularly those that are active in the pancreas where insulin is produced. We see genes involved in pathways through which the body's fat cells can influence biological processes elsewhere in the body. And we see a set of transcription factor genes -- genes that help control what other genes are active."

The study authors said they are continuing their investigation of the genetic changes behind type 2 diabetes by fully sequencing patients' DNA.

"Not only will we be able to look for signals we've so far missed, but we will also be able to pinpoint which individual DNA change is responsible," McCarthy said. "These genome sequencing studies will really help us push forward towards a more complete biological understanding of diabetes."

The study was published online Aug. 12 in Nature Genetics.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about the genetics of diabetes.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of Oxford, news release, Aug. 12, 2012

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists solving the mystery of human consciousness
2. Scientists uncover multiple faces of deadly breast cancer
3. Scientists identify major source of cells defense against oxidative stress
4. Scientists tailor cell surface targeting system to hit organelle ZIP codes
5. Scientists rewrite rulebook on breast cancer in landmark global study
6. Warwick scientists uncover how checkpoint proteins bind chromosomes
7. NIH scientists link quickly spreading gene to Asian MRSA epidemic
8. Joslin scientists identify important mechanism that affects the aging process
9. Scripps Research scientists show how memory B cells stay in class to fight different infections
10. Scientists Map Melanomas Genome
11. A*STAR scientists discover switch to boost anti-viral response to fight infectious diseases
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Scientists ID New Gene Regions Linked to Type 2 Diabetes
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... toilets were," said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases simply ... so that individuals will always be protected from germs." , He developed the ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Consistent ... sharing, the 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs meeting will showcase ... Sunday, March 6, 2016, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas with a pre-conference ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... CBD College is proud to announce ... (CAAHEP) awarded accreditation to its Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. CBD College is honored to ... of twelve colleges and universities in the state of California make the cut. CBD ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... MI (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... for substance abuse located in central Michigan, have come together on Thanksgiving Day ... specially produced video, available for viewing on the Serenity Point YouTube channel, patients ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Jobs in hospital medical laboratories ... and offered by healthcare staffing agency Aureus Medical Group . These ... October 2015 among those searching for healthcare jobs through the company’s website, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... Juntendo universitetssjukhus ser potential att använda ... magnetresonansbilder (MR-bilder) för patienter med multipel ... ett forskningsavtal med SyntheticMR AB för att ... forskningsprojekt på sjukhuset. Med SyMRI kan man ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... PUNE, India , November 26, ... --> --> ... Research Report" and "Investigation Report on ... 2019 and 2021 forecasts data and ... library. . ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 2015 ) ... "Radioimmunoassay Market by Type (Reagents & Kits, ... Clinical Diagnostic Labs), Application (Research, Clinical Diagnostics), ... report to their offering. --> ... of the "Radioimmunoassay Market by Type ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: