Navigation Links
School Sports May Cut Rates of Violence, Bullying Among Teens
Date:5/5/2013

SUNDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Playing school sports is known to have many benefits for teens, but researchers have found a new reason to encourage kids to take up a sport: It may reduce teen girls' likelihood of being involved in violence and some teen boys' risk of being bullied.

In the study, researchers examined data from about 1,800 high school students, aged 14 to 18, who took part in the 2011 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and found that 25 percent played team sports, 9 percent took part in an individual sport, and 17 percent played both team and individual sports.

Girls involved in individual or team sports were less likely to have been in a fight in the past year than girls who didn't play sports (14 percent versus 22 percent, respectively). Girls who played sports were also less likely than nonathletes to have carried a weapon in the past 30 days (6 percent versus 11 percent, respectively).

However, boys who played individual or team sports were no less likely than boys who did not play sports to fight or carry a weapon. About 32 percent of boys in the study reported fighting and 36 percent reported carrying weapons in the past 30 days, according to the study presented Sunday at the Pediatric Academic Societies' annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

"Athletic participation may prevent involvement in violence-related activities among girls but not among boys because aggression and violence generally might be more accepted in boys' high school sports," senior author Dr. Tamera Coyne-Beasley, a professor of pediatrics and internal medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in an American Academy of Pediatrics news release.

The researchers did find that boys who played team sports were less likely to be bullied than boys who played individual sports.

"Though we don't know if boys who play team sports are less likely to be the perpetrators of bullying, we know that they are less likely to be bullied," Coyne-Beasley noted. "Perhaps creating team-like environments among students such that they may feel part of a group or community could lead to less bullying."

The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The Nemours Foundation explains how parents can teach kids not to bully.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: American Academy of Pediatrics, news release, May 5, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Even Preschoolers View the Overweight Negatively
2. Catastrophic Head Injuries to High School Football Players Rising
3. That impulsive, moody preschooler may grow up to be a problem gambler
4. Some Schools Dont Let Kids Carry Asthma Inhalers
5. Awards to 5 IU School of Medicine physicians address critical need for geriatricians
6. Excessive sleepiness may be cause of learning, attention and school problems
7. Study: More Pre-Teens Get Vaccines When Middle Schools Require Them
8. A place to play: Researcher designs schoolyard for children with autism
9. Fees Lead Some Kids to Skip After-School Sports: Survey
10. Outstanding high school students receive awards to stimulate research interest in digestive diseases
11. The Tennessee Car Accident Lawyers at Michael D. Ponce & Associates Alert Public of CDC Survey Revealing Majority of High School Seniors Admitting to Texting Behind Wheel
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
School Sports May Cut Rates of Violence, Bullying Among Teens
(Date:5/27/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed ... inspiring human interest stories, which come courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health ... industry, from leading advocates and associations—namely Abilene Christian University. , As the nursing ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last ... meeting, expect Janet Yellen and company to wait until March 2017 for an interest ... University’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cabot Corporation, Pfizer, and 3M are responsible ... documents and SEC filings. A jury has returned a verdict of $32.8 ... Case No. BC588866, Los Angeles County, California. The jury awarded $22.8 million in ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Connor Sports, through its Connor Cares initiative, will ... Tamika Catchings Legacy Tour that will commemorate the Indiana Fever legend’s hall-of-fame career ... all forms and levels of the game, Connor Sports has committed to a significantly ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Pittsburgh, PA (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 ... ... transplantation, and one that has a significant negative impact on long-term patient survival, ... to date. The results, published online this week in the Journal of Thoracic ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... , May 27, 2016 ... instances of hypertension is driving ambulatory blood pressure monitoring ... their elasticity and their ability to respond to different ... This condition can lead to various cardiovascular disorders such ... vascular disease. These diseases are growing in prevalence each ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... FRANCISCO , May 27, 2016 ... company focused on developing products for Regenerative Medicine, Neurology and Orphan ... will be presenting at two upcoming investor conferences: ... Center, 730 Third Avenue, New York City , ... 3:00pm Marcum MicroCap Conference   Where: ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... 26, 2016 A key trend ... the emergence of new treatments. Cardax, a development stage ... treatment. The therapy is expected to fulfil large unmet ... is conducting studies to develop new treatments for osteoarthritis. ... genes involved in osteoarthritis are being investigated, and early ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: