Navigation Links
Sanford-Burnham scientists unravel cancer drug's secret to resistance
Date:3/19/2012

LA JOLLA, Calif., March 19, 2012 Drug resistance is a serious problem for cancer patientsover time, a therapy that was once providing some benefit simply stops working. Scientists at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) recently discovered how cancer cells develop resistance to a drug called MLN4924. This experimental therapy is currently being tested in a number of Phase I and Phase I/II clinical trials to determine its efficacy against several different types of cancer, including multiple myeloma, leukemia, and lymphoma.

Published online March 19 by Cell Reports, the study shows that MLN4924-resistant cancer cells escape death because they have a simple mutation in the drug's targetNEDD8-activating enzymethat prevents the drug from binding. In unraveling this mechanism, the researchers also developed a relatively quick, low-cost laboratory method that can be used to personalize cancer therapies by predicting how cancer patients will respond to this or other drugsall before a person starts taking it.

"Due to genetic variability, some tumors might be more prone to developing resistance to treatment than others. Pinpointing the right treatment for an individual can be a frustrating and costly trial-and-error process. The method we developed in this study to determine the mechanism of resistance for one anti-cancer drug gives us a jumpstart on knowing if this resistance mechanism will hold true for other drugspotentially saving time and money," said Matthew Petroski, Ph.D., assistant professor in Sanford-Burnham's National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Center and senior author of the study.

MLN4924: Promising anti-cancer drug

MLN4924 kills most cancer cells by binding and inactivating the NEDD8-activating enzyme. NEDD8 and the enzymes that control it are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system (so-named because it's ubiquitous, found in every cell in the body).

This complex network of enzymes tags proteins with a molecule called ubiquitin. Once it receives this "kiss of death," a protein is destined for the proteasome, the cell's "meat grinder." Depending on which proteins are being destroyed, this process helps control almost every aspect of cellular function and is frequently altered in cancer.

When MLN4924 shuts down NEDD8, a critical part of the ubiquitin proteasome system malfunctions and instead of continuing to proliferate, cancer cells die.

According to Petroski, finding new ways to target the ubiquitin proteasome system and prevent it from chewing up key proteins is a promising research area that might lead to powerful new anti-cancer therapeutics.

How cancer cells escape MLN4924

Petroski and his laboratory, including the study's first author, researcher Julia Toth, Ph.D., discovered that MLN4924 kills more than 99 percent of cancer cells in laboratory tests. Yet a small population survives.

In that small but important population of MLN4924-resistant cells, Petroski's team found a mutation in the NEDD8-activating enzyme. With just a single change in a single nucleotide in the gene that encodes this enzyme, the cells were able to survive.

"Gleevec and other cancer drugs that work by binding and inactivating kinasesanother class of enzymesalso lose their potency when their target proteins mutate. But this is the first time such a mechanism has been identified for a drug that targets an enzyme of the ubiquitin proteasome system," Petroski said.

Understanding how cancer cells manage to avoid death at the hands of MLN4924 provides clues as to how scientists might improve it or other drugs that target the ubiquitin proteasome system in a way that makes them more effective. In addition to further developing their laboratory test to determine a drug's efficacy, Petroski and his team are now leveraging this knowledge to find new anti-cancer drugsparticularly drugs that can circumvent this newly discovered resistance mechanism.


'/>"/>
Contact: Heather Buschman, Ph.D.
hbuschman@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5343
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Sanford-Burnham research advances to patient studies at TRI
2. Sanford-Burnham and Florida Hospital review obesity research progress with Takeda Pharmaceutical
3. Moffitt, Sanford-Burnham and Florida Hospital create Personalized Medicine Partnership of Florida
4. Sanford-Burnham researchers find molecular switch that allows melanoma to resist therapy
5. Scripps Health and Sanford-Burnham to collaborate to advance new cancer treatments
6. Dr. Kristiina Vuori Promoted to President of Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
7. Dana-Farber and Sanford-Burnham Institute license flu-targeting antibodies to Genentech and Roche
8. Scientists develop a software tool for estimating heart disease risk
9. UCLA scientists uncover mechanism for melanoma drug resistance
10. No workout? No worries: Scientists prevent muscle loss in mice, despite disease and inactivity
11. New test can better predict successful IVF embryos, scientists say
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Sanford-Burnham scientists unravel cancer drug's secret to resistance
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... TopConsumerReviews.com recently awarded their highest five-star rating to Best Buy ... in the United States and Canada wear eyeglasses. Once considered to be a purely ... make a fashion statement. Even celebrities use glasses as a way of creating an ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Pixel Film Studios Released ProSlice ... "Film editors can give their videos a whole new perspective by using the ... of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Levels contains over 30 Different presets to ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women need a treatment plan ... require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation of fertility and ultimately ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 ... brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live ... not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Beach, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... UCLA with Magna Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of ... Diego and returned to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , Belgium , June ... MKT: VNRX), today announced the appointment of Dr. ... of Directors as a Non-Executive Director, effective June ... Company,s Audit, Compensation and Nominations and Governance Committees.  ... Dr. Futcher will provide independent expertise and strategic ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Any dentist who has made an ... current process. Many of them do not even offer this ... and high laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able ... such a high cost that the majority of today,s patients ... Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets has ... Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report to ... report contains up to date financial data derived from varied ... major trends with potential impact on the market during the ... segmentation which comprises of sub markets, regional and country level ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: