Navigation Links
Risk of marijuana's 'gateway effect' overblown, new UNH research shows
Date:9/1/2010

DURHAM, N.H. New research from the University of New Hampshire shows that the "gateway effect" of marijuana that teenagers who use marijuana are more likely to move on to harder illicit drugs as young adults is overblown.

Whether teenagers who smoked pot will use other illicit drugs as young adults has more to do with life factors such as employment status and stress, according to the new research. In fact, the strongest predictor of whether someone will use other illicit drugs is their race/ethnicity, not whether they ever used marijuana.

Conducted by UNH associate professors of sociology Karen Van Gundy and Cesar Rebellon, the research appears in the September 2010, issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior in the article, "A Life-course Perspective on the 'Gateway Hypothesis.' "

"In light of these findings, we urge U.S. drug control policymakers to consider stress and life-course approaches in their pursuit of solutions to the 'drug problem,' " Van Gundy and Rebellon say.

The researchers used survey data from 1,286 young adults who attended Miami-Dade public schools in the 1990s. Within the final sample, 26 percent of the respondents are African American, 44 percent are Hispanic, and 30 percent are non-Hispanic white.

The researchers found that young adults who did not graduate from high school or attend college were more likely to have used marijuana as teenagers and other illicit substances in young adulthood. In addition, those who used marijuana as teenagers and were unemployed following high school were more likely to use other illicit drugs.

However, the association between teenage marijuana use and other illicit drug abuse by young adults fades once stresses, such as unemployment, diminish.

"Employment in young adulthood can protect people by 'closing' the marijuana gateway, so over-criminalizing youth marijuana use might create more serious problems if it interferes with later employment opportunities," Van Gundy says.

In addition, once young adults reach age 21, the gateway effect subsides entirely.

"While marijuana use may serve as a gateway to other illicit drug use in adolescence, our results indicate that the effect may be short-lived, subsiding by age 21. Interestingly, age emerges as a protective status above and beyond the other life statuses and conditions considered here. We find that respondents 'age out' of marijuana's gateway effect regardless of early teen stress exposure or education, work, or family statuses," the researchers say.

The researchers found that the strongest predictor of other illicit drug use appears to be race-ethnicity, not prior use of marijuana. Non-Hispanic whites show the greatest odds of other illicit substance use, followed by Hispanics, and then by African Americans.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Van Gundy
karen.vangundy@unh.edu
603-862-1896
University of New Hampshire
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. GateWay Community College Receives Strong Endorsement for Re-accreditation
2. New gateway to treat leukemia and other cancers
3. BMEGateway Announces Insurance Symposium Will Focus on Orthopedic Issues with an All-star Team of Experts Held May 18, 2010
4. BMEGateway's 20th Anniversary Insurance Symposium considered a “Tremendous” Success
5. Datatel's Hosted Pay-by-Phone Credit Card Payment IVR Gateway Receives Heartland Payment Systems Certification
6. Drug May Ease Cognitive Effects of Huntingtons
7. Low forms of cyclin E reduce breast cancer drugs effectiveness
8. Gastric Banding Most Effective for Obese Teens
9. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
10. China Cord Blood Corporation Warrant Registration Statement Declared Effective by SEC
11. YazTalk Warns Women of Life Threatening Side Effects
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/5/2016)... , ... May 05, 2016 , ... Einstein Medical ... Twitter feed to cover the latest news and commentary at the 2016 ASCRS/ASOA Symposium ... meeting of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and the American Society ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... TLC Laser Eye Centers ... California. The laser eye center will now be called “Gordon Schanzlin New Vision Institute, ... will remain at the full-service facility to ensure that patients continue to receive the ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... ... successful results with IVF and with egg freezing, today announced the grand opening ... and highest quality fertility care, Spring Fertility offers both fertility preservation (egg, sperm, ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... ... Seminars for Business Journalists , led by the Wharton School’s most prominent ... issues.  This one-day program at the Wharton School’s San Francisco campus will ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... Indianapolis, IN (PRWEB) , ... May 05, 2016 ... ... employee benefits advisory organization, announces McLaughlin & Smoak Benefits as the latest addition ... & Smoak Benefits has a dedicated team of compliance, wellness, human resources, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... , May 3, 2016  While you may be familiar with watching a film or ... also known as ultra-high-definition or 8MP in the Medical Industry.  Ampronix  is a renowned authorized ... innovative technology. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160502/362730 ... ... ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... Inc. (NYSE: DPLO) announced today that it is celebrating Hepatitis Awareness Month with a campaign ... their personal story and encourage those at risk to get tested and begin the road ... ... ... Pharmacy (PRNewsFoto/Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc.) ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... 3, 2016 According to market ... Development, Growth and Demand Forecast to 2022 - Industry ... (High Field, Very High Field, Low to Mid Field, ... Neck, Spine, Musculoskeletal, Vascular, Breast, Pelvic and Abdomen, Cardiac, ... imaging (MRI) market was valued at $5,351.7 million in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: