Navigation Links
Risk of cancer
Date:6/29/2009

Finnish Academy Professors Lauri Aaltonen and Jussi Taipale have identified and described a mechanism whereby a single-base change in the human genome increases the risk of colorectal cancer.

The focus in this study was on a common single-base variant occurring in chromosome 8, which in itself causes only a slightly increased risk of cancer. However, the risk allele is carried by 75% of people of European origin and by almost 100% of African populations.

The high frequency of the gene variant makes it a very common cause of cancer at the population level. At the individual level, however, the variant does not cause significant disease predisposition because that can often be considerably reduced by lifestyle changes. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide and a major cause of cancer mortality.

Mutation mechanisms activate pathways regulating cancer

The variant that increases the risk of colorectal cancer was found to be located in a regulatory region, where it changes the function of a key regulatory element important for the development of colorectal cancer. The scientists showed that the risk allele strengthens the binding of a regulatory factor in cancer cells, which activates pathways that are central to the development of cancer. The impacts of this altered genetic regulation on cell division are probably mediated via the MYC cancer gene, which is one of the best known accelerator genes in cancer.

Single-base changes are the most common type of variation found in the human genome. Genome-wide studies of interindividual differences in common variants can be studied using DNA chip technology, which has greatly facilitated efforts to understand the genetic basis of multifactorial diseases. To date, scientists have identified more than 400 variants in the human genome that are associated with an increased risk of common diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Multidisciplinary research

The findings of this research lend support to the theory that human disease susceptibility is explained in part by differences in regulatory regions of the genome, and in gene expression. A closer understanding of the biological mechanisms involved will help to clarify the aetiology of colorectal cancer and pave the way to more effective cancer prevention. Apart from hereditary tumor predisposition, another area of major strength for Finnish research is gene regulation. It was hardly surprising therefore that Aaltonen's and Taipale's research teams found each other so easily. The research project supervised by Aaltonen and Taipale involved molecular biologists, medical doctors and data processing researchers from Finland and the UK. For instance, the project made use of the EEL software developed by Professor Esko Ukkonen and his team at the CoE for Algorithmic Data Analysis.


'/>"/>

Contact: Academy Professor Lauri Aaltonen
lauri.aaltonen@helsinki.fi
358-505-846-763
Academy of Finland
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Statement from IDF on studies suggesting possible link between insulin glargine and cancer
2. Second gene linked to familial testicular cancer
3. Look Good...Feel Better and OPI Celebrate 20 Years of Helping Women Cope With Cancer
4. Launch of Targeted Agents and Increased Use of Maintenance Therapy Will Drive the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Drug Market to Nearly Triple to Almost $10 Billion in 2018
5. Chemical Nose May Sniff Out Cancer Earlier
6. Dietary fat linked to pancreatic cancer
7. Breast Cancer Numbers Dip Most in Wealthy, Urban Areas
8. Eating Animal Fat May Lead to Pancreatic Cancer
9. Positive CHMP Opinion for JAVLOR(R) in Metastatic Treatment of Bladder Cancer After Failure of a Prior Platinum-Containing Regimen
10. Cancer Researchers Link DICER1 Gene Mutation to Rare Childhood Cancer
11. Minor League Baseball Teams Aim to Strike Out Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2017 , ... Most us ... concern, but a new study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative shows that certain ... knee osteoarthritis. Knowing this in advance may give doctors the opportunity to treat patients ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... week to review more than eighty-nine grant submissions all vying for nearly $1,000,000 ... in the Parkinson’s field.     , The American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA) is focused ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... Fairfax, VA (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2017 ... ... is pleased to announce a new educational seminar to focus on current legislative ... Regulatory News(LEARN) seminar will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 10, and will ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... Somnoware, ... NOX-T3 portable sleep monitor with its Somnoware Sleep Device Interface (SDI). Somnoware SDI ... diagnostic device operations. With this platform, initializing devices and importing studies are just ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... is sharing bold recipes for Memorial Day entertaining that are sure to satisfy ... “Boar’s Head fresh sliced meats and cheeses featured in these refreshingly balanced recipes ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/10/2017)... Radiology has become the number one diagnostic ... spiraled to the number one ranking as a result.  ... before as the most complete and reliable method for ... back pain an MRI may confirm a suspected herniated ... in entirely different treatment protocols.  In these circumstances, patients ...
(Date:5/9/2017)... , May 9, 2017  Demonstrating its ... board of directors for the Pharmaceutical Research and ... for membership. Biopharmaceutical companies will now have to ... order to be eligible to join PhRMA. ... the board is sending a clear message that ...
(Date:5/8/2017)... YORK , May 8, 2017 ... the transition from fee for service reimbursement. Black Book ... 2017. 1.       The Market for MIPS ... 77% of physician practices with 3 or more ... Technology Solutions by Q4. "Given the magnitude of the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: