Navigation Links
Revolutionary techniques could help harness patients' own immune cells to fight disease
Date:1/3/2013

The human body contains immune cells programmed to fight cancer and viral infections, but they often have short lifespans and are not numerous enough to overcome attacks by particularly aggressive malignancies or invasions. Now researchers reporting in two separate papers in the January 4th issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Stem Cell used stem cell technology to successfully regenerate patients' immune cells, creating large numbers that were long-lived and could recognize their specified targets: HIV-infected cells in one case and cancer cells in the other. The findings could help in the development of strategies to rejuvenate patients' exhausted immune responses.

The techniques the groups employed involved using known factors to revert mature immune T cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can differentiate into virtually any of the body's different cell types. The researchers then expanded these iPSCs and later coaxed them to redifferentiate back into T cells. Importantly, the newly made T cells were "rejuvenated" with increased growth potential and lifespan, while retaining their original ability to target cancer and HIV-infected cells. These findings suggest that manipulating T cells using iPSC techniques could be useful for future development of more effective immune therapies.

In one study, investigators used T cells from an HIV-infected patient. The redifferentiated cells they generated had an unlimited lifespan and contained long telomeres, or caps, on the ends of their chromosomes, which protect cells from aging. This is significant because normal aging of T cells limits their expansion, making them inefficient as therapies. "The system we established provides 'young and active' T cells for adoptive immunotherapy against viral infection or cancers," says senior author Dr. Hiromitsu Nakauchi, of the University of Tokyo.

The other research team focused on T cells from a patient with malignant melanoma. The redifferentiated cells they created recognized the protein MART-1, which is commonly expressed on melanoma tumors. "The next step we are going to do is examine whether these regenerated T cells can selectively kill tumor cells but not other healthy tissues. If such cells are developed, these cells might be directly applied to patients," says senior author Dr. Hiroshi Kawamoto, of the RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology. "This could be realized in the not-so-distant future."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary Beth OLeary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. A Revolutionary Dietary Paradigm: New Cookbook Features A SOS-free (Salt, Oil, Sugar ) Diet That Delivers the Optimal Food Plan for Renewing Health
2. Vygone Presents a Revolutionary Electro Waveform Device to Help Treat Molluscum Contagiosum Lesions
3. Naturel Collagen Canada Unveils C RUM, the Newest Addition to the Revolutionary Natural Collagen Skin Care Product Line
4. Brand id¦Strategic Partners Launches Revolutionary Personal Branding Success Program for Women
5. Mount Sinai Grad Student, 25, Named to Forbes ’30 Under 30’ In Science and Healthcare for ‘Revolutionary New Ideas’
6. New Techniques May Improve Infant Heart Surgery
7. New tools and techniques enhance laparoscopic gallbladder removal
8. Flu outbreaks predicted with weather forecast techniques
9. Improved techniques may help recovery and prevent incidents of missing drivers with dementia
10. Red wine, fruit compound could help block fat cell formation
11. Pulse pressure elevation could presage cerebrovascular disease in Alzheimers patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Revolutionary techniques could help harness patients' own immune cells to fight disease
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... TherapySites, the leading website and ... Tennessee Counseling Association. This new relationship allows TherapySites to continue to extend ... exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , "TCA is extremely excited about this new ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... On June 10-11, 2016, A Forever Recovery, ... Festival and World’s Longest Breakfast Table in Battle Creek, MI, where the rehabilitation facility ... home to some of the world’s leading providers of cereal and other breakfast foods. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... policy issues and applications at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at ... on several important health care topics including advance care planning, healthcare costs and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong ... Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. ... to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have ... these feelings, many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as ... Michigan, has released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Any dentist who has ... of the current process. Many of them do not even ... technical difficulties and high laboratory costs involved. And those who ... it at such a high cost that the majority of ... Dr. Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 23, 2016 Roche ... received 510(k) clearance for its Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) ... severe sepsis or septic shock. With this clearance, Roche ... provide a fully integrated solution for sepsis risk assessment ... associated with bacterial infection and PCT levels in blood ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets has ... 52" report to their offering. ... creates a favourable commercial environment for MedImmune to enter. The ... that will serve to drive considerable growth for effective anti-influenza ... to cap sales considerably, but development is still in its ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: