Navigation Links
Response to First Treatment May Predict Epilepsy's Course
Date:5/9/2012

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- The way someone responds to the first anti-seizure medication given after a diagnosis of epilepsy often predicts how well- controlled their seizures will be over time.

A new study found that about 50 percent of people became seizure-free after the first medication they took. By contrast, only 13 percent became seizure-free after the second drug was tried, and just 4 percent were seizure-free after a third drug was tried.

"The long-term treatment outcome is fairly constant, and thus predictable early on, in most people with epilepsy," said the study's lead author, Dr. Patrick Kwan, a professor of neurology at the University of Melbourne, in Australia. "Few patients become seizure-free after failure of the first two medications tried," he added.

Results of the study are published in the May 9 online issue of the journal Neurology.

Epilepsy is a seizure disorder. You generally have to have two or more unexplained seizures to be diagnosed with epilepsy, according to the Epilepsy Foundation. About 70 million people have epilepsy worldwide, according to background information in the study.

A number of medications are available to stop seizures, and these may be given alone or in combination. Brain surgery and other non-drug options are available for treating epilepsy.

The current study included nearly 1,100 people aged 9 to 93 who were newly diagnosed with epilepsy and prescribed one medication as their initial treatment. The median age of the study volunteers was 32 years, and they were followed for up to 26 years.

Sixty-eight percent were seizure-free at the final clinic visit. Sixty-two percent of those people were seizure-free on a single drug therapy. Study participants were considered seizure-free if they hadn't had a seizure in at least a year without any changes in their treatment.

The response to the first medication tried often predicted how a patient might respond to additional medications. Half responded to the first medication tried and became seizure-free.

For those who had to take a second drug, either alone or in combination with another drug, 13 percent became seizure-free. When a third drug had to be tried, just 4 percent became seizure-free. By the fifth drug tried, less than 1 percent became seizure-free.

Overall, 37 percent of those trying medications became seizure-free immediately. Another 22 percent became seizure-free within six months of starting treatment.

Sixteen percent had what's known as relapsing-remitting seizures. After being seizure-free for a year or more, they had as many as five periods of seizure relapse.

Twenty-five percent never became seizure-free, according to the study.

"Given that epilepsy can be controlled with medications in the majority of patients -- nearly 70 percent -- a lack of response should call for re-evaluation for conditions other than epilepsy," Kwan said, adding that if you haven't responded to the first two drugs your doctor tries, you should be seen by a physician at a specialized epilepsy center for non-drug treatments.

Dr. Cynthia Harden, chief of the division of epilepsy and electroencephalography at the Cushing Neuroscience Institute in Great Neck, N.Y., agreed. "Most people do well on the first or second drug. Some people need a combination to become seizure free. But, if someone fails monotherapy and combination therapy, it's time to think about options other than drugs," she said.

"Surgery, for the right patient, is the only disease-altering treatment. It can stop seizures completely," she explained, and added that a newer technique called laser-ablation therapy can also be helpful.

More information

Learn more about epilepsy treatments from the Epilepsy Foundation.

SOURCES: Patrick Kwan, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair, neurology, University of Melbourne, Australia; Cynthia Harden, M.D., chief, division of epilepsy and electroencephalography, Cushing Neuroscience Institute, Great Neck, N.Y., and professor, neurology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, N.Y.; May 9, 2012, Neurology, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
2. ASCROs Response to NY Times Articles on Radiation Therapy Incidents
3. TV Shows Often Botch Proper Seizure Responses
4. Belief in a caring god improves response to medical treatment for depression
5. Aggressive response helped Chilean hospital improve H1N1 influenza outcomes
6. International Medical Corps Emergency Response Team on Standby as It Monitors Situation in Chile and Potential Tsunami Areas
7. Tips for Safe Charitable Giving in Response to Earthquakes in Chile and Haiti
8. NOW Foods Response to Fish Oil and PCB Concerns
9. Bodys Response to Foods Smell, Taste Could Be Diabetes Risk Factor
10. Protein in Breast Tumors May Predict Chemo Response
11. Merely seeing disease symptoms may promote aggressive immune response
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Response to First Treatment May Predict Epilepsy's Course
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Ellevate Network, ... in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their inaugural Summit in ... around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 million. To watch ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field”: the story of ... Philippines. “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field” is the creation of ... taught all ages and currently teaches a class of ladies at her church, which ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... The company has ... today’s consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula ... the highest standard. , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Dr. Parsa Mohebi, the Los ... article to the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal section, featuring articles ... procedure known as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). , Dr. Mohebi says ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Health Literacy Innovations (HLI), creator of the ... the Cancer Patient Education Network (CPEN), an independent professional organization that shares best ... alliance. , As CPEN’s strategic partner, HLI will help support CPEN members ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)...  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ... quarter of 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Lilly ... with the investment community and media to further detail ... will begin at 9 a.m. Eastern time. Investors, media ... of the conference call through a link that will ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Labs announces the European launch of their new low volume, high ... in Cambridge, U.K on October 4th. The ... with unprecedented speed and sensitivity while using far less sample volume ... ... ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... , Sept. 28, 2017 Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ... earnings conference call and webcast on Friday, November 3, ... (EDT) and ending at approximately 8:30 a.m. (CDT) / ... the company,s 2017 financial performance and guidance for 2018, ... initiatives to enhance operational performance, and long-range financial outlook ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: