Navigation Links
Researchers use CT to predict heart disease
Date:9/27/2010

OAK BROOK, Ill. Using incidental findings from routine diagnostic CT, radiologists may be better able to identify people at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a new study appearing online and in the November issue of Radiology.

"The results of this study show that radiologists can predict cardiovascular disease fairly well using incidental findings of calcifications of the aortic wall on CT, along with minimal patient information, such as age, gender and the reason for the CT," said the study's lead author, Martijn J. A. Gondrie, M.D., from the Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care at the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands. "Ultimately, this easily executed extra risk stratification has the potential to reduce future heart attacks or other cardiovascular events."

Over the past 10 years, the use of chest CT has increased substantially, and CT image quality has dramatically improved. As a result, many more incidental findings occur. Incidental findings are unexpectedly detected imaging characteristics that are unrelated to the original clinical indication for the CT.

Dr. Gondrie's study is part of the Prognostic Value of Ancillary Information in Diagnostic Imaging (PROVIDI) project, which aims to investigate the relevance of unexpectedly detected imaging findings on chest CT.

"This is the first study to investigate whether incidental findings can predict future disease in a routine care setting," Dr. Gondrie said. "Incidental findings are obtained without additional radiation exposure or cost to the patient and may hold valuable clues as to the patient's overall health and their risk for future disease."

Dr. Gondrie and colleagues developed prediction models incorporating incidental aortic findings detected on chest CT. From a total of 6,975 patients who had undergone diagnostic, contrast-enhanced chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications, a representative sample of 817 patients, plus 347 patients who experienced a cardiovascular event during a mean follow-up period of 17 months, were included in the study. Scores were assigned for incidental aortic abnormalities found on CT, including calcifications, plaques, elongation and other irregularities. Other factors taken into account included the patient's age, gender, and CT indication.

While each aortic abnormality was highly predictive, the prediction model incorporating the sum score for aortic calcifications was most indicative of future cardiovascular events.

"PROVIDI is the first study of its scale and scope that seeks to investigate the potential of incidental findings to predict future disease and thus identify patients at risk," Dr. Gondrie said. "It generates the much-needed insights that allow more effective utilization of the increasing amount of diagnostic information, and it could potentially change the way radiologists contribute to the efficiency of daily patient care."


'/>"/>

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. VCU study: Researchers discover a drug combination that shrinks tumors in vivo
2. Sugary sports drinks mistakenly associated with being healthy, say UTHealth researchers
3. Researchers create first molecule blocks key component of cancer genes on-off switch
4. Researchers create first molecule-blocks key component of cancer genes on-off switch
5. Team of researchers finds possible new genetic risk for Alzheimers disease
6. UCLA cancer researchers discover new signaling pathway that controls cell development and cancer
7. European Researchers Find Genes Tied to Asthma
8. New treatment for severe aortic stenosis shown to save lives, Stanford researchers say
9. Queens University researchers locate impulse control center in brain
10. Researchers investigate differences in quality of care delivered by US resident and staff physicians
11. UNC researchers identify genetic patterns that may predict osteoarthritis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... The Golseth Agency, a Texas based insurance management ... spearheading a regional charity campaign organized to provide support to Christina Upchurch and her ... year, Christina and her children returned from out of town to find her husband ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... Alcovit, a lime-flavored beverage that ... its marketing efforts with its product now available through Jet.com. , After 25 ... The effervescent powdered drink is designed to quickly detox the body thereby avoiding alcohol-induced ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... ... “Dangerous Inheritance”: a mystery about saving the family farm. “Dangerous Inheritance” is the ... was raised on a farm. As Diane wrote this story, she used fond ... mantra of ‘neighbors helping neighbors’ have always been a large part of her farming ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... Rollon Skin ... anti-aging skincare solutions, recently announced the launch of two new skincare products, ... yet effective alternative to expensive plastic surgery or in-patient cosmetic dermatological procedures. , ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... ... Coatesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center. “Case #10-5411 Veterans Administration” is the creation ... domestic abuse. In June 1990, Carol Mulhem started work at the Coatesville ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2017)... -- 7D Surgical, developer of ground breaking surgical navigation technologies, ... System to support its strategic sales plan in ... Virginia.  7D Surgical has entered into an exclusive sales representative ... facilities within those markets. ... Spartan Medical Purchases 7D ...
(Date:7/27/2017)... 2017  Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZBH) ... 30, 2017.  The Company reported second quarter net sales ... prior year period, and an increase of 2.1% on ... of contribution from the LDR Holding Corporation acquisition, second ... of 2016, or 0.3% on a constant currency basis. ...
(Date:7/26/2017)... Aesthetics, a leading medical aesthetic clinic in Singapore ... skin conditions from the inside. The natural process of ... skin becomes more transparent due to the thinning of the epidermis. Over ... the sun contributes to aging skin, causing age spots and other ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: