Navigation Links
Researchers use CT to predict heart disease

OAK BROOK, Ill. Using incidental findings from routine diagnostic CT, radiologists may be better able to identify people at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a new study appearing online and in the November issue of Radiology.

"The results of this study show that radiologists can predict cardiovascular disease fairly well using incidental findings of calcifications of the aortic wall on CT, along with minimal patient information, such as age, gender and the reason for the CT," said the study's lead author, Martijn J. A. Gondrie, M.D., from the Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care at the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands. "Ultimately, this easily executed extra risk stratification has the potential to reduce future heart attacks or other cardiovascular events."

Over the past 10 years, the use of chest CT has increased substantially, and CT image quality has dramatically improved. As a result, many more incidental findings occur. Incidental findings are unexpectedly detected imaging characteristics that are unrelated to the original clinical indication for the CT.

Dr. Gondrie's study is part of the Prognostic Value of Ancillary Information in Diagnostic Imaging (PROVIDI) project, which aims to investigate the relevance of unexpectedly detected imaging findings on chest CT.

"This is the first study to investigate whether incidental findings can predict future disease in a routine care setting," Dr. Gondrie said. "Incidental findings are obtained without additional radiation exposure or cost to the patient and may hold valuable clues as to the patient's overall health and their risk for future disease."

Dr. Gondrie and colleagues developed prediction models incorporating incidental aortic findings detected on chest CT. From a total of 6,975 patients who had undergone diagnostic, contrast-enhanced chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications, a representative sample of 817 patients, plus 347 patients who experienced a cardiovascular event during a mean follow-up period of 17 months, were included in the study. Scores were assigned for incidental aortic abnormalities found on CT, including calcifications, plaques, elongation and other irregularities. Other factors taken into account included the patient's age, gender, and CT indication.

While each aortic abnormality was highly predictive, the prediction model incorporating the sum score for aortic calcifications was most indicative of future cardiovascular events.

"PROVIDI is the first study of its scale and scope that seeks to investigate the potential of incidental findings to predict future disease and thus identify patients at risk," Dr. Gondrie said. "It generates the much-needed insights that allow more effective utilization of the increasing amount of diagnostic information, and it could potentially change the way radiologists contribute to the efficiency of daily patient care."


Contact: Linda Brooks
Radiological Society of North America

Related medicine news :

1. VCU study: Researchers discover a drug combination that shrinks tumors in vivo
2. Sugary sports drinks mistakenly associated with being healthy, say UTHealth researchers
3. Researchers create first molecule blocks key component of cancer genes on-off switch
4. Researchers create first molecule-blocks key component of cancer genes on-off switch
5. Team of researchers finds possible new genetic risk for Alzheimers disease
6. UCLA cancer researchers discover new signaling pathway that controls cell development and cancer
7. European Researchers Find Genes Tied to Asthma
8. New treatment for severe aortic stenosis shown to save lives, Stanford researchers say
9. Queens University researchers locate impulse control center in brain
10. Researchers investigate differences in quality of care delivered by US resident and staff physicians
11. UNC researchers identify genetic patterns that may predict osteoarthritis
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/29/2015)... ... 29, 2015 , ... Key Housing, a top-rated corporate housing service for the ... apartment community: Epic. In showcasing this featured apartment community in San Jose, Key Housing ... market to efficiently find housing suitable to their needs by showcasing quality housing. , ...
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... ... 6:00 a.m. EST until 11:59 p.m. EST, customers will be racing the ... orders $80 or more to free gifts with purchases, there will be a new sale ... website for skin care and cosmetic needs, customers will save on already discounted prices. , ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... According to an article ... University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia suggested that laws requiring bicyclists ... The article explains that part of the reason for the controversial conclusion is that, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... An inventor, from ... dispense prescription medications at home, so he invented the patent-pending ELECTRONIC M.D. , ... prescription medications. In doing so, it could help to prevent potential overdose situations. ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ProSidebar: ... in Final Cut Pro X. With ProSidebar: Fasion, video editors can easily add ... ProSidebar as a minimalist title opener. Utilize presets featuring self-animating drop zones, lines, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/27/2015)... 26, 2015 ... the "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing ... and Sales Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, Instrumentation ... to their offering. --> ... "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... UTRECHT , Nederland, November 26, 2015 ... --> Een nieuwe aanpak combineert ... van gevorderde kanker. ... -->      (Photo: ... van het Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum (LUMC) ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... the addition of the "2016 Future ... Drugs of Abuse Testing Market: Supplier Shares, ... report to their offering. --> ... of the "2016 Future Horizons and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: