Navigation Links
Researchers unlock the protein puzzle
Date:7/23/2014

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even lung disease.

George Mason researchers unraveled the mystery of deciphering the contact points where proteins touch each other. "One protein interlocks with another protein like adjacent pieces in a jigsaw puzzle, and this sends a signal down the line to the next protein," says Lance Liotta, co-director of the Mason-based Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine.

The mystery is in the "hot spots" where proteins interlock. Researchers know which proteins connect but couldn't pinpoint where it happens. Until now, thanks to Mason's newly published approach.

Dyesthe type used in common copying machines and textilesare mixed with proteins. The dye paints the proteins everywhere except where the proteins are connected to one another. Then the proteins are disconnected but the dye remains, excluding the blank spot where the proteins were "kissing."

Finding ways to break up interlocking proteins could be used to locate new drug targets, says Virginia "Ginny" Espina, a professor with the center. Pharmaceutical companies could use the Mason-developed process to create drugs that break up the protein-to-protein connection or stop it from happening altogether, she says.

The team tackled a complex interaction of three proteins, called interleukin signaling, that leads to painful inflammatory arthritis and other diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. They created two inhibitorsa peptide and an antibodythat broke up the protein connection in a test tube. "Both inhibitors made these proteins fall apart and they couldn't send out a signal for inflammation," Liotta says.

Until the Mason-led advancement, researchers have struggled to figure out where proteins make contact. "It seems very easy but, in reality, it's not," says Alessandra Luchini, a professor with the proteomics center who created the experimental method.

Researchers have used computer modeling and crystalized proteins but couldn't show proteins making contact in real time, she says. "Using this tool, we now can study the protein exactly as it's found in nature," Luchini says.

And as it turns out, the printer dyes not only paint a pretty picture, but they are the perfect size to color the proteinsand they stick. The Mason team is using blue, red, purple and orange dyes.


'/>"/>
Contact: Michele McDonald
mmcdon15@gmu.edu
703-993-8781
George Mason University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Communication about female condom vital to young adults, UT Arlington researchers say
2. Feinstein Institute researchers identify brain network
3. CNIO researchers discover a gene that links stem cells, ageing and cancer
4. University of Houston researchers create new method to draw molecules from live cells
5. Researchers Spot Potential New Culprit Behind Alzheimers
6. Researchers demonstrate health risks posed by third hand tobacco smoke
7. Chinese researchers describe impaired self-face recognition in those with major depressive disorder
8. UC Davis Researchers' Discovery Has Implications for Developing Treatments for Deafness
9. Georgia State Researchers Discover Hidden Variations in Neuronal Networks, May Explain Differences In Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes
10. RSNA: Researchers Assess Emergency Radiology Response After Boston Marathon Bombings
11. Researchers assess emergency radiology response after Boston Marathon bombings
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder of ... ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership in ... It also provides a forum to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said Somekh. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... Global Healthcare Management’s 4th Annual Kids Fun Run brought ... This free event, sponsored by Global Healthcare Management’s CEO, Jon Letko, is aimed at ... towards children of all ages; it is a non-competitive, non-timed event, which is all ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: ... “America On The Brink” is the creation of published author, William Nowers. ... As a WWII veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. Following ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( ... announced today the introduction of an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. ... you get maximum comfort while controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... HMP ... the recipient of a 2017 Folio Magazine Eddie Digital Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare ... City on October 11, 2017. , The annual award competition recognizes editorial and design ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/22/2017)... , Sept. 22, 2017  As the latest Obamacare ... Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and Lindsey Graham ... that the medical device industry is in an odd ... tax, the 2.3% excise tax on medical device sales ... also want covered patients, increased visits and hospital customers ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... a venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically assisted, platform therapy that uses pulsed ...   ... Jim Bertolina, ... Tom Tefft ... medical device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who has led R&D and business development ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... Mich. , Sept. 18, 2017  PMD Healthcare ... Specialty Pharmacy of Kalamazoo, Mich. , ... hub service that expedites and streamlines patient and provider ... PD 2.0, and wellness management services.  ... device used to measure lung function for a variety ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: