Navigation Links
Researchers train the immune system to deliver virus that destroys cancer in lab models
Date:12/18/2007

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- An international team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic have designed a technique that uses the bodys own cells and a virus to destroy cancer cells that spread from primary tumors to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system. In addition, their study shows that this technology could be the basis for a new cancer vaccine to prevent cancer recurrence.

The study appeared in the Dec. 9 online issue of Nature Medicine.

The technology combines infection-fighting T-cells with the vesicular stomatitis virus that targets and destroys cancer cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. The study, which has not yet been replicated in humans, is significant because it describes a potential new therapy to treat and prevent the spread of cancer in patients.

We hope to translate these results into clinical trials. However, until those trials are done, its difficult to be certain that what we see in mouse models will clearly translate to humans. Were hopeful that will be the case, says Richard Vile, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic specialist in molecular medicine and immunology and the studys principal investigator.

In primary cancers of the breast, colon, prostate, head and neck and skin, the growth of secondary tumors often pose the most threat to patients, not the primary tumor. The prognosis for these patients often depends upon the degree of lymph node involvement and whether the cancer has spread.

Dr. Vile and colleagues theorized that they could control the spread of cancer through the lymphatic system (bone marrow, spleen, thymus and lymph nodes) by manipulating the immune system.

Researchers zeroed in on immature T-cells from bone marrow, programming them to respond to specific threats to the immune system while delivering a cancer-destroying virus to the tumor cells.

To deliver the virus, researchers removed T-cells from a healthy mouse, loaded them with the virus and injected the T-cells back into the mouse. Researchers found that once the T-cells returned to the lymph nodes and spleen, the virus detached itself from the T-cells, found the tumor cells, selectively replicated within them and extracted tumor cells from those areas.

CANCER VACCINE

The procedure used in this study triggered an immune response to cancer cells, which means that it could be used as a cancer vaccine to prevent recurrence.

We show that if you kill tumor cells directly in the tumor itself, you can get a weak immunity against the tumor, but if you use this virus to kill tumor cells in the lymph nodes, you get a higher immunity against the tumor, Dr. Vile says.

RESULTS

The technique used in this study successfully treated the cells of three different diseases: melanoma, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. The results include:

  • Two days after treatment, the presence of melanoma tumor cells in lymph nodes was significantly less, but not completely gone. There were no cancer cells in the spleen.

  • Ten-to-14 days after a T-cell transfer, both the lymph nodes and spleen were free of melanoma tumor cells.

  • Mice treated with a single dose of the T-cells transfer developed a potent T-cell response against melanoma tumor cells.

  • Although the procedure was not intended to treat the primary melanoma tumor, significant reductions in tumor cells were observed.

  • In mice with lung cancer metastasis, cancer cells were significantly reduced in one-third of mice and completely eradicated in two-thirds of mice. Efforts to clear metastases from colorectal tumors were similarly effective.

  • Lung and colorectal tumor cells were purged from lymph nodes. Also, the spleens of mice that had lung cancer developed immunity to the cancer after the treatment.

The technology already exists to extract T-cells from patients, attach the virus and inject the cells back into the patients. Doctors currently use a similar process to attach radioactive tracers to T-cells when trying to find the source of an infection in patients.

This is technology that is relatively easy to translate to humans because it involves taking T-cells from the patient -- something routinely done today -- loading them with this virus and then putting those T-cells back into patients whose cancer has spread to lymph nodes, are at high risk of the cancer spreading to other parts of the body or are at high risk of succumbing to the cancer, Dr. Vile says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Amy Reyes
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
3. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
4. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
5. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
6. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
7. Researchers estimate about 9 percent of US children age 8 to 15 meet criteria for having ADHD
8. Majority of 2.4 Million U.S. Children With ADHD Not Diagnosed or Consistently Treated, According to New Gold Standard Study by Cincinnati Childrens Researchers
9. Researchers develop long-lasting growth hormone
10. Jefferson immunology researchers halt lethal rabies infection in brain
11. Purdue researchers develop technology to detect cancer by scanning surface veins
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Element Blue ™, a leading ... strategic partnership with Lucidworks , the company transforming the way people access ... for building powerful enterprise search applications. , Element Blue is a global team ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... i2i Population Health, a national leader ... , “Cary’s broad financial background is an excellent fit for i2i,” ... and day-to-day financial operations skills we need to take the company to the next ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 24, 2017 , ... The ... MSC Cruises as part of the line’s 4th Annual MSC True Partnerships’ Awards. ... performing North American travel partners for the year based on overall business growth in ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... Twelve startups ... of the 2017 Cupid's Cup Entrepreneurship Competition. Chaired by Under Armour Founder and ... The entrepreneurs will showcase their businesses on February 6, 2017, at Under Armour’s ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... West’s Health ... annual Solutions Series of webinars will start January 31 with a session about ... of current health and benefits topics, including employee engagement, pricing transparency, population health ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/24/2017)... India , Jan. 24, 2017 Market Research Future has ... Market for Wound Closure Device is growing rapidly and expected to continue ... ... at a CAGR of 5% from 2013 to 2019 and reaching a ... of the forecasted period, 2016-2022 Global Wound Closure Device Market ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Nev. , Jan. 24, 2017  The ... that specializes in high-value orthopaedic implants, announced the ... today. The OIC Tibial Nail ... tibia. Strategically placed proximal and distal screw holes ... hole that allows dynamization.  The nail is available ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... 2017 Trifecta Clinical , a leading ... Rick Ward to Vice President of Commercial ... also announcing the promotion of Ericka Atkinson ... Rick joins Trifecta from Greenphire where he was ... business development positions within the healthcare industry throughout his ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: