Navigation Links
Researchers take steps toward development of a vaccine against tick-transmitted disease
Date:7/29/2014

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have made an important advancement toward developing a vaccine against the debilitating and potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA).

During the past several years, experts have seen a steady rise in the incidence of human infections caused by tick-transmitted bacterial pathogens making the need for a vaccine critical. Successful vaccine development hinges on knowing what to target to prevent disease, and the VCU team has identified three such proteins on the surface of the HGA agent.

HGA is caused by a bacterium called Anaplasma phagocytophilum. HGA is transmitted by the same ticks that transmit Lyme disease, and it is the second most-common tick-borne disease in the United States. Between 2003 and 2012, the number of cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention increased more than sixfold. However, evidence indicates that many more cases go undocumented. The disease is also found in Europe and Asia and can affect dogs, cats, horses and sheep.

In a study, published in the August issue of the journal Cellular Microbiology, researchers report the discovery of a protein called A. phagocytophilum invasion protein A, or AipA, found on the surface of the bacterium. It is a key player in mammalian cell invasion. They identified the specific region of this protein that is necessary for infection.

Further, they discovered that AipA works together with two other previously identified A. phagocytophilum surface proteins, OmpA and Asp14, to enable the pathogen to optimally invade host cells.

"This is an important finding because it highlights that pathogens use cooperative, even redundant mechanisms to invade host cells," said lead investigator Jason A. Carlyon, Ph.D., associate professor and a George and Lavinia Blick Scholar in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the VCU School of Medicine.

"Based on these findings, an effective preventative or therapeutic approach would be best achieved by targeting all three factors, rather than just one. Our research is a promising lead towards vaccine development against granulocytic anaplasmosis and is a blueprint for developing prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against pathogens that use multiple surface proteins to infect," he said.

"Furthermore, we have determined that humans and animals make antibodies against AipA, OmpA, and Asp14 during granulocytic anaplasmosis, which means they could be used to develop effective diagnostic tests for the disease."

Carlyon is working with Richard T. Marconi, Ph.D., professor of microbiology and immunology in the VCU School of Medicine, to translate these findings into a vaccine against granulocytic anaplasmosis. A patent application has been filed and the technology is available for licensure. For further information, contact VCU Innovation Gateway ott@vcu.edu.

This study builds on previously published work from the Carlyon lab. In 2012 and 2013, the team identified OmpA and Asp14, and determined that they worked together to promote A. phagocytophilum infection.

But, at that time, they also determined that a piece of the puzzle was missing.

"While using antibodies to target both did significantly reduce infection of host cells, the blocking was incomplete. This suggested to us the involvement of at least one additional Anaplasma protein, which, in this study, we identified as AipA," Carlyon said.

Next, the team will identify the key regions necessary for infection for surface proteins, OmpA and Asp14, and then validate whether targeting the regions of all three proteins prevents infection using a mouse model. According to Carlyon, the information could be used to develop a "trifecta vaccine" to target the relevant regions of the three proteins, and thereby provide effective protection against infection.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sathya Achia Abraham
sbachia@vcu.edu
804-828-1231
Virginia Commonwealth University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UTSW cancer researchers identify irreversible inhibitor for KRAS gene mutation
2. Researchers identify potential biomarker for AD
3. BU researchers discover that Klotho is neuroprotective against Alzheimers disease
4. Researchers discover new way to determine cancer risk of chemicals
5. A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis
6. Researchers unlock the protein puzzle
7. Communication about female condom vital to young adults, UT Arlington researchers say
8. Feinstein Institute researchers identify brain network
9. CNIO researchers discover a gene that links stem cells, ageing and cancer
10. University of Houston researchers create new method to draw molecules from live cells
11. Researchers Spot Potential New Culprit Behind Alzheimers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... ... LLC (“Quick”), a highly specialized asset-light logistics provider of complex transport solutions ... definitive agreement to purchase Unitrans International Corporation, a division of Roadrunner Transportation ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... As an ... an educational webinar, they will present the line of epMotion automated liquid handling ... easy you can automate everyday pipetting tasks. , Ideal for scientists and lab ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... Moore Insurance, a Houston ... east Texas, is launching a regional charity effort to provide publicity assistance and ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation (PBTF) has raised nearly $30 million in donations that ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... The Golseth Agency, a Texas based ... area, is spearheading a regional charity campaign organized to provide support to Christina Upchurch ... of this year, Christina and her children returned from out of town to find ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... Alcovit, a lime-flavored beverage that rids the ... efforts with its product now available through Jet.com. , After 25 years of ... powdered drink is designed to quickly detox the body thereby avoiding alcohol-induced hangovers. Whether ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... 15, 2017 AccuGenomics, Inc., a diagnostic company ... announced that the company has provided an AccuKit to ... Carolina at Chapel Hill and to Qura Therapeutics for ... and quantify HIV reservoir and viral expression in human ... HIV Cure Center is a joint initiative between the ...
(Date:8/8/2017)... Israel, Aug. 8, 2017  BioLineRx Ltd. (NASDAQ/TASE: BLRX), ... today reports its financial results for the second quarter ... during the second quarter 2017 and to date: ... clinical development programs for the Company,s lead project, BL-8040: ... pivotal study with BL-8040 as novel stem cell mobilization ...
(Date:8/7/2017)... 2017  Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), the nation,s largest ... June 30, 2017.  All comparisons, unless otherwise noted, are to ... Second Quarter 2017 Highlights include: ... an increase of 3.5% Total prescriptions dispensed ... of 7.5% versus 7.6% Gross profit ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: