Navigation Links
Researchers present new findings on cancer and gene therapy
Date:4/7/2011

WASHINGTON, April 7, 2011 DNA's role as the master blueprint of the cell means that even small sequence changes can have catastrophic consequences. For this reason, much of our understanding of cancer development comes from studying how cells copy DNA and repair sequence errors -- and how these processes can go wrong.

Next week, a thematic program at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology's annual meeting at the Experimental Biology 2011 conference in Washington, D.C., will bring together researchers from across the country to discuss recent developments in DNA replication, recombination, and repair, and the importance of these activities in cancer and gene therapy. It will launch Sunday in Room 206 of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

Theme organizers Marlene Belfort from the Wadsworth Center at the New York State Department of Health and Joann B. Sweasy from Yale University have assembled a roster of experts who will present recent discoveries in how cells manage the process of copying DNA, adding and removing stretches of sequence in the genome, and the consequences of when mistakes occur.

Aberrant DNA Repair, Genomic Instability and Cancer: The first platform session will be held from 9:55 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. Sunday. Cells accumulate at least 20,000 DNA lesions a day that require repair to maintain healthy cellular function. Because maintaining a stable genome is crucial to preventing disease, research on aberrant DNA repair and other processes that alter DNA sequence are important aspects of understanding the development of cancer. This session will feature researchers from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Yale University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Site-Specific Recombination in Chromosome Dynamics and Gene Therapy: The second round of talks, to be held from 3:45 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, will focus on gene therapy, a promising area of research that is developing techniques to correct mutations as a means of preventing or treating disease. The three talks will feature researchers from the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Washington and the University of Pennsylvania describing specific applications currently under study for targeted gene correction and genome engineering.

Replication of Noncanonical DNA Sequences and Genomic Instability: The third platform session in the program, 9:55 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Tuesday, will highlight research on noncanonical, or nonstandard, DNA structures that can destabilize DNA strands and lead to breakage and mutations. This session will present research on the mutation-causing effects of non-canonical DNA structures and the mechanisms cells use to copy DNA and repair damage to avoid mutations and cancer. Scientists from the Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, Yale University and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center will speak.

Retroelements in Genome Plasticity and Cancer: In the final round of talks, to be held from 1:45 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, three researchers will talk about retroelements, stretches of genetic sequence that can copy themselves and insert the copy in different places in the genome. The insertion of retroelements can lead to diverse outcomes, some beneficial and some lethal, and this session will cover both aspects. A researcher from the Cleveland Clinic will describe his studies on a retrovirus that may cause prostate cancer, and two scientists from the Wadsworth Center will talk about retrotransposons and their contrasting functions in genetic diversity and aging.


'/>"/>

Contact: Angela Hopp
ahopp@asbmb.org
301-634-7389
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Fox Chase researchers find that fish oil boosts responses to breast cancer drug tamoxifen
2. Fox Chase researchers report that naproxen reduces tumors in a mouse model of colon cancer
3. UPCI, Pitt researchers present findings of cancer studies at AACR 102nd Annual Meeting
4. Using MRI, researchers may predict which adults will develop Alzheimers
5. Researchers use zebrafish to identify new gene linked to melanoma
6. Researchers identify the metabolic signaling pathway responsible for dyslipidemia
7. Fox Chase researchers develop a screen for identifying new anticancer drug targets
8. Dangerous blood pressure increases during exercise can be blocked, UT Southwestern researchers find
9. Researchers mimic bodys own healing potential to create personalised therapies for inflammation
10. BATTLE researchers identify new biomarkers for EGFR inhibition
11. Researchers need to engage lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transginder populations in health studies
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/27/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2017 , ... Are you ... tragic spike in water-related accidents and drownings during the summer. While most of us ... that these situations occur every day. Very few people are taking the time to ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... ... April 26, 2017 , ... ... management in hospitals, today announced it has completed a round of funding to ... LLC and its partners. Black Granite Capital is a growth equity firm focused ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... ... ... Journal of Oral Implantology – Tooth loss is not simply an ... complications with speech, eating, and overcompensation of mouth due to the deficiency. To combat ... number of tooth replacements increase, it is imperative to design an implant that will ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... ... April 26, 2017 , ... CareSet Labs today is releasing ... measured in Part D Medicare data. The dataset, called PaPR (Providers and Prescribing ... faxes or paper. The PaPR (pronounced "paper") data set aggregates this information ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... , ... April 26, 2017 , ... ... in Hackensack, N.J. has been honored by Enterprising Women magazine as one of ... the world’s top women business owners. Winners have demonstrated that they have fast-growth ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... Global Surgical Drainage Device Market: Overview ... remove excess liquid and air. The fluid to be ... lymph. Surgical drains are used in a wide variety ... cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, plastic surgery etc. Common use of ... of fluid e.g. blood or pus. Surgical drains are ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... April 19, 2017 ... immune response in pets such as canine, avian ... of various types such as Attenuated Live Vaccines, ... DNA Vaccines and Recombinant Vaccines. Attenuated live vaccines ... or bacteria, which have been weakend under laboratory ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017 Cogentix Medical, ... on providing the Urology, Uro/Gyn and Gynecology markets with ... the first quarter ended March 31, 2017 after the ... The Company will host a conference call and ... on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. Eastern ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: