Navigation Links
Researchers' new method may sharpen microscopic images
Date:3/21/2013

UT Dallas researchers are developing a new low-light imaging method that could improve a number of scientific applications, including the microscopic imaging of single molecules in cancer research.

Electrical engineering professor Dr. Raimund Ober and his team recently published their findings in the journal Nature Methods. In the journal, they describe a method which minimizes the deterioration of images that can occur with conventional imaging approaches.

"Any image you take of an object is translated by the camera into pixels with added electronic noise," Ober said. "Any distortion of an image makes it harder to obtain accurate estimates of the quantities you're interested in."

This method could greatly enhance the accuracy with which quantities of interest, such as the location, size, and orientation of an object, are extracted from the acquired images.

Ober and his team tackled this problem by using the EMCCD camera (a standard low-light image detector) in a highly unconventional setting. Using this method, scientists can estimate quantities of interest from the image data with substantially higher accuracy than those made with conventional low-light imaging.

"We have figured out through rigorous theoretical developments that when you run an EMCCD camera in such a way that very few photons hit each of its pixels, the resulting image is minimally corrupted by the camera noise," he said. "Our method is about using the EMCCD camera to its fullest potential, beyond what is commonly believed to be possible by the scientific imaging community."

By increasing the magnification of the image to reduce the number of photons detected in each image pixel, they were able to significantly reduce the camera noise and considerably lessen the deteriorative effect of pixilation.

In fact, the team managed to attain particle localization accuracy that was twofold higher than those obtained with conventional EMCCD imaging.

Ober and his team applied UAIM (Ultrahigh Accuracy Imaging Modality) to the live-cell tracking of a standard protein marker for breast cancer. By being able to accurately follow the movement of the marker, valuable insights on the biology of breast cancer could be gained.

"The tracking of individual proteins represents an important way to study cancer and other diseases at the molecular level," Ober said. "The applications of UAIM for diagnostics and research are promising."


'/>"/>

Contact: Katherine Morales
kxm109320@utdallas.edu
972-883-4321
University of Texas at Dallas
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers tackle physician challenge of correctly ordering laboratory tests
2. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers study use of dasatinib for patients with high-risk MDS
3. Brain Circuitry Yields Clue to Autism, Researchers Say
4. NIH-supported researchers identify new class of malaria compounds
5. Researchers develop new anatomically based classification for diagnosing cervical spinal stenosis
6. Mayo Clinic researchers develop test to gauge severity of concussions
7. University of Maryland researchers identify fish protein that may inhibit cancer metastasis
8. UCLA researchers create tomatoes that mimic actions of good cholesterol
9. Researchers identify a promising target for multiple sclerosis treatments
10. Spanish researchers link cancer to failures in chromosome protection for the first time
11. Researchers devise hidden dune filters to treat coastal stormwater runoff
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Infectious disease affects billions of people ... States, it’s a threat that is constantly changing and evolving. Mediaplanet's “Fighting Infection” ... strategies for the healthcare community to help decrease the number of completely preventable ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... ... The Radiology Business Management Association (RBMA) has named the nine ... 12th year, are among the most prestigious in radiology marketing because a panel of ... to recognize achievements in both large budget (over $5,000) and small budget (under $5,000) ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... San Antonio, TX (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... a new clinic which can be found at 9618 Huebner Road. The clinic is ... Thobaben, PT, OCS, Clinic Director, and Dr. Ali Higgins, PT, will provide care from ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... Mlynarek Insurance Agencies, a ... and business owners across eastern Michigan, is connecting with the Oxford/Orion FISH Food ... difficulties. , The Oxford/Orion FISH Food Pantry works to ensure homeless, hungry, and ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Diego, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 ... ... has raised over $100,000 for its innovative EcoQube Frame vertical micro-veggies garden on ... the instant demand for the product – with nearly 2,000 consumers (and counting) ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... March 23, 2017  HealthMine surveys with 9,250 insured ... that health plan members want help from their plans ... engaged in their health, 2) help closing gaps in ... for health and 5) relevant, real-time guidance. Meeting these ... healthcare costs. A Reason to ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Cryostat Market ... the next decade to reach approximately $3.5 billion by 2025. ... all the given segments on global as well as regional levels ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Executive Summary ... primary research (inputs from industry experts, companies, stakeholders) ... the analysis of global heart valve devices market ... Replacement Procedure By Technique (Mechanical, Bioprosthetic, Transcatheter Aortic ... Balloon Valvuloplasty, Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair (TMVR)), By ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: