Navigation Links
Researchers identify genomic variant associated with sun sensitivity, freckles
Date:11/21/2013

Researchers have identified a genomic variant strongly associated with sensitivity to the sun, brown hair, blue eyes and freckles. In the study of Icelanders the researchers uncovered an intricate pathway involving the interspersed DNA sequence, or non-coding region, of a gene that is among a few dozen that are associated with human pigmentation traits. The study by an international team including researchers from the National Institutes of Health was reported in the Nov. 21, 2013, online edition of the journal Cell.

It is more common to find people with ancestors from geographic locations farther from the equator, such as Iceland, who have less pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. People with reduced pigment are more sensitive to the sun, but can more easily draw upon sunlight to generate vitamin D3, a nutrient essential for healthy bones.

The researchers, including scientists from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), a part of NIH, analyzed data from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 2,230 Icelanders. A GWAS compares hundreds of thousands of common differences across individuals' DNA to see if any of those variants are associated with a known trait.

"Genes involved in skin pigmentation also have important roles in human health and disease," said NHGRI Scientific Director Dan Kastner, M.D., Ph.D. "This study explains a complex molecular pathway that may also contribute insights into skin diseases, such as melanoma, which is caused by the interaction of genetic susceptibility with environmental factors."

The GWAS led the researchers to focus on the interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) gene, previously associated with immunity. IRF4 makes a protein that spurs production of interferons, proteins that fight off viruses or harmful bacteria. The researchers noted from genomic databases that the IRF4 gene is expressed at high levels only in lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell important in the immune system, and in melanocytes, specialized skin cells that make the pigment melanin. The new study established an association between the IRF4 gene and the pigmentation trait.

"Genome-wide association studies are uncovering many genomic variants that are associated with human traits and most of them are found in non-protein-coding regions of the genome," said William Pavan, Ph.D., co-author and senior investigator, Genetic Disease Research Branch, NHGRI. "Exploring the biological pathways and molecular mechanisms that involve variants in these under-explored portions of the genome is a challenging part of our work. This is one of a few cases where scientists have been able to associate a variant in a non-coding genomic region with a functional mechanism."

The Icelandic GWAS yielded millions of variants among individuals in the study. The researchers narrowed their study to 16,280 variants located in the region around the IRF4 gene. Next, they used an automated fine-mapping process to explore the set of variants in IRF4 in 95,085 people from Iceland. A silicon chip used in the automated process enables a large number of variants to be included in the analysis.

The data revealed that a variant in a non-coding, enhancer region that regulates the IRF4 gene is associated with the combined trait of sunlight sensitivity, brown hair, blue eyes and freckles. The finding places IRF4 among more than 30 genes now associated with pigmentation, including a gene variant previously found in people with freckles and red hair.

Part of the research team, including the NHGRI co-authors, studied the IRF4's role in the pigment-related regulatory pathway. They demonstrated through cell-culture studies and tests in mice and zebrafish that two transcription factorsproteins that turn genes on or offinteract in the gene pathway with IRF4, ultimately activating expression of an enzyme called tyrosinase. One of the pathway transcription factors, MITF, is known as the melanocyte master regulator. It activates expression of IRF4, but only in the presence of the TFAP2A transcription factor. A greater expression of tyrosinase yields a higher production of the pigment melanin in melanocytes.

"This non-coding sequence harboring the variant displayed many hallmarks of having a function and being involved in gene regulation within melanocyte populations," said Andy McCallion, Ph.D., a co-author at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and collaborator with the NHGRI group.

The newly discovered variant acts like a dimmer switch. When the switch in the IRF4 enhancer is in the on position, ample pigment is made. Melanin pigment gets transferred from melanocytes to keratinocytes, a type of skin cell near the surface of the skin, and protects the skin from UV radiation in sunlight. If the switch is turned down, as is the case when it contains the discovered variant, the pathway is less effective, resulting in reduced expression of tyrosinase and melanin production. The exact mechanism that generates freckling is not yet known, but Dr. Pavan suggests that epigenetic variationa layer of instructions in addition to sequence variationmay play a role in the freckling trait.

More research is needed to determine the mechanism by which IRF4 is involved in how melanocytes respond to UV damage, which can induce freckling and is linked to melanoma, the type of skin cancer associated with the highest mortality.


'/>"/>

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-443-3523
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Cincinnati Childrens researchers develop first molecular test to diagnose eosinophilic esophagitis
2. What composes the human heart? U of T researchers crunch the numbers
3. NSU researchers receive $4.1 million grant from DOD to investigate Gulf War illness
4. Bedroom access to screen-based media may contribute to sleep problems in boys with autism, MU researchers find
5. Researchers Identify a New Genetic Risk Factor for Severe Psychiatric Illness
6. New Mobile Reporting Platform from OneWhitePixel Links Scientific Researchers With Field Reporters
7. Researchers find protein that regulates the burning of body fat
8. Johns Hopkins heart researchers develop formula to better calculate bad cholesterol in patients
9. U of M researchers find HIV protein may impact neurocognitive impairment in infected patients
10. Nanotech researchers 2-step method shows promise in fighting pancreatic cancer
11. Get Out and Play! Radio Flyer is Searching for Innovative New Ride-On Toys for Kids to Inspire Outdoor Play as Researchers Recommend Limiting Kids' Screen Time
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Code Word: Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account ... Word: Chocolate Biscuit” is the creation of published author, Marlyn Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, ... he went to school and at 19 years of age, he joined the Navy and ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... Oscillating Positive Expiratory Pressure (OPEP) device, was featured in a study indicating superior ... MEd, RRT-ACCS, FAARC, “Analysis of Three Oscillating Positive Expiratory Pressure Devices During ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... to Christmas:” a beautiful and enchanting tale that teaches children the true meaning of Christmas. ... in Oklahoma City, and a devoted woman of faith. , “Becoming a parent changes ... back of my mind for years, but actually doing it might have been a while ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... “The Land ... brings attention to the issue of world hunger, and shares the simple and achievable ... Brubaker, devoted husband and member of the Fairview Missionary Church in Angola, Indiana where ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... Today, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid ... CMS’s Alternative Payment Models (APMs) in 2017. Clinicians who participate in APMs are paid ... important part of the Administration’s effort to build a system that delivers better care ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/20/2017)... Wells Specialty Pharmacy announces the acquisitions and merger ... Winter Park, Florida and Pharm-EZ Medical, ... have been consolidated into the 3796 Howell Branch Road Facility. ... that Chad Tomlinson , former Vice President of Operations, ... Mr. Tomlinson is a Graduate of Florida State University and ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 Report Details What can ... are going to grow at the fastest rates? This ... data, trends, opportunities and prospects. Our 190-page report ... lucrative areas in the industry and the future market ... across the all the major categories of the ophthalmic ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... This report on the opioid induced constipation ... the global market. Large number of chronic pain sufferers ... is a major side effect of consumption of opioid ... therapy has been prescribed to treat opioid induced constipation. ... and growing awareness about the therapy are the major ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: