Navigation Links
Researchers find biomarkers in saliva for detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer
Date:2/16/2010

Physicians and scientists agree: If we cannot entirely prevent cancer, the next best thing is to find it earlier to augment the chances of a successful fight.

The good news is that there may soon be a new weapon in the battle against the so-called "worst" cancer cancer of the pancreas. A multidisciplinary group of investigators from the UCLA School of Dentistry, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the UCLA School of Public Health and UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has demonstrated the usefulness of salivary diagnostics in the effort to find and fight the disease.

Their results, published by the journal Gastroenterology, are available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2009.11.010.

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common type of cancer of the pancreas, is also the most lethal of all cancers, with a mortality rate that is approximately the same as the rate of incidence. The American Cancer Society reports that more than 42,000 people in the United States received a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in 2009, and the disease caused more than 35,000 deaths. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in this country. For both men and women, the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer is about one in 72.

A "silent killer," pancreatic cancer produces its typical symptoms abdominal pain and jaundice only in the advanced stage of the disease, making it difficult to fight. Fewer than 5 percent of those diagnosed with the disease live for five years, and full remission is very rare, according to the World Health Organization.

"Worldwide, the prevalence of pancreatic cancer is so high, and the disease is so deadly, that it calls out for a reliable means of early diagnosis," said the study's senior investigator, David Wong, D.M.D., D.M.Sc., UCLA's Felix and Mildred Yip Professor of Dentistry and associate dean of research at the dental school. "The ability to implement safe, cost-effective, widespread screening could be the answer to saving thousands of lives each year and that is what we are after."

In the past few years, technological advances have pushed the concept of salivary diagnostics for systemic disease to the forefront of scientific attention.

"David Wong and his team at the dental school have demonstrated the usefulness of saliva in detecting oral cancer," said co-first author James Farrell, M.D., an associate professor in the UCLA Division of Digestive Diseases and director of the Pancreatic Diseases Program at UCLA. "As a clinician-scientist who manages patients with all stages of pancreatic cancer, I was eager to work with them to explore the possibilities it could yield in diagnosing this disease."

In the study, the researchers successfully linked changes in the molecular signatures found in human saliva to the presence of early-stage pancreatic cancer.

By analyzing altered gene expression, the researchers identified four messenger RNA (mRNA) biomarkers KRAS, MBD3L2, ACRV1 and DPM1 that differentiate pancreatic cancer patients from non-cancer subjects (both those diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis and healthy controls) with 90 percent sensitivity and 95 percent specificity.

"Our recent findings underscore the potential for salivary diagnostics to play a pivotal role in the detection of systemic cancers and diseases," said Lei Zhang, Ph.D., an assistant researcher at the UCLA School of Dentistry Dental Research Institute and co-first author of the study.

"Not only are these saliva-based diagnostic methods for pancreatic cancer simple and noninvasive, they may also represent an improvement in specificity and sensitivity over currently used procedures, such as blood tests, for early pancreatic cancer detection," Farrell said.

Due to the study's modest sample size of 90 human subjects, the researchers acknowledge limitations, yet express enthusiasm for further research. They are formulating plans to test the salivary biomarkers in a larger population in a multicenter study. And they note that the potential for salivary mRNA biomarkers to identify very early-stage and even pre-invasive pancreatic cancer requires further investigation.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sandra Shagat
sshagat@dentistry.ucla.edu
310-206-0835
University of California - Los Angeles
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Clemson researchers develop hands-free texting application
2. GUMC researchers say flower power may reduce resistance to breast cancer drug tamoxifen
3. Urine protein test might help diagnose kidney damage from lupus, UT Southwestern researchers find
4. Researchers create drug to keep tumor growth switched off
5. Researchers Who Discovered First Genes for Stuttering will Present Findings to the National Stuttering Association
6. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
7. UH Case Medical Center researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer
8. Researchers map all the fragile sites of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiaes genome
9. UCSF Researchers Identify Regulator of Human Sperm Cells
10. Researchers find broad spectrum antiviral that fights multitude of viruses
11. Caregivers of ICU patients are collateral damage of critical illness, say Pitt researchers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Steven Tonkinson, 36, of Coconut Grove, ... year since it started in 2003. This year, he ran all 26.2 miles with ... and NBA team the Miami Heat. , This Sunday, while many are watching the ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... p.m. at the Day Block Event Center in Minneapolis, Minn. Triumph Over Parkinson’s will ... , Larry Schneiderman, owner of Schneiderman’s Furniture, lives with Parkinson’s disease and is the ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Toronto, Ontario (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... the Scarborough General Hospital Burn Unit, plastic and cosmetic surgeon Dr. Wayne Carman transitioned ... the Scarborough Hospital. He successfully completed his first three-year term as chief and began ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Regular gym users know the routine: each ... longer to access the treadmills. It’s a predictable trend. After the excesses of November ... get in shape by joining gyms, starting new walking or running routines, or signing ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Dr. Justin Scott ... their 2nd Annual No Cost Dental Day to individuals in need. The event is ... of this No Cost Dental Day is to provide dental care to community members ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... 5, 2016  Syneron Medical Ltd. (NASDAQ: ... announced today that William Griffing , Chief ... scheduled to participate in the Leerink Partners 5 ... 11, 2016 in New York City ... to meet with the Mr. Griffing and will ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... DUBLIN , Feb. 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the "Global ... financials" company profile to their offering. ... announced the addition of the "Global ... financials" company profile to their offering. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... 2016  Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ... underwritten secondary offering of 11,027,558 shares of its common ... of Blackstone and Goldman Sachs.  The shares are being ... $96.45 per share. The selling stockholders will receive all ... nor any of its directors, officers or other stockholders ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: