Navigation Links
Researchers fight America's 'other drug problem'

COLUMBIA, Mo. Medications do not have a chance to fight health problems if they are taken improperly or not taken at all. Non-adherence to medications costs thousands of lives and billions of dollars each year in the United States alone, according to the New England Healthcare Institute. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed an intervention strategy that is three times more effective than previously studied techniques at improving adherence in patients.

Cynthia Russell, associate professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, found that patients who used a Continuous Self-Improvement strategy drastically improved their medication adherence. The strategy focuses on counseling patients to understand how taking medications can fit into their daily routines. Nurses meet with patients and discuss their daily schedules to identify optimal times to take medications and safe places to store their medications.

"Continuous Self-Improvement is a personalized strategy, and the scheduling is different for every patient," Russell said. "Finding the right place and time for patients to take medications can be as simple as storing the pill bottles in their cars so their medication will be available for them to take during the morning commute to work."

In the study, kidney transplant patients were given pill bottles with caps that automatically recorded the date and time whenever they were opened. Each month, a nurse reviewed the results in illustrated reports with the patients and discussed how they could improve their adherence. The researchers found significant improvements among patients' adherence rates. The results indicate the technique is three times more effective than previously studied techniques.

Russell recommends that patients meet with nurses to implement the strategy a few months after medical procedures, when they have returned to their normal routines. During follow-up appointments, patients can discuss potential problems and strategies for taking their medications.

"Ideally, all patients should use electronic monitoring pill bottles because it enables them to see computerized graphs of their previous month's medication schedules and medication taking," Russell said. "We found that patients enjoyed seeing their results at each meeting and were interested in receiving the feedback."

An estimated 35 percent of kidney transplant patients do not take their medications daily and 75 percent do not take their medications at the correct times. It is important for transplant patients to take medications correctly because incorrect dosages could result in side-effects, rejection of the organs or death.


Contact: Emily Martin
University of Missouri-Columbia

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers map the way to personalised treatment for ovarian cancer
2. Four NYU researchers receive New York Academy of Sciences 2010 Young Scientists awards
3. AAPS presents awards to exemplary researchers
4. Yerkes researchers present at 40th Annual Society for Neuroscience Conference
5. Researchers see ethical dilemmas of providing care in drug detention centers
6. Circuit regulating anti-diabetic actions of serotonin uncovered by UT Southwestern researchers
7. U of M researchers find learning in the visual brain
8. Researchers discover important link between adrenal gland hormone and brain in hypertension
9. Hebrew University researchers discover expanded role for cancer-causing gene
10. Researchers expand cyberspace to fight chronic condition in breast cancer survivors
11. Researchers led by St. Michaels Hospital receive grant to teach new method of CPR
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Researchers fight America's 'other drug problem'
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... ... The Multiple System Atrophy Coalition has announced the launch of its MSA Can’t ... today to coincide with Giving Tuesday 2015, a global day of fundraising. , ... be productive, to do simple daily activities like walking to the mailbox and eating ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... Royal River Natural Foods — a locally-owned, ... post-menopausal women who took the nutritional supplement creatine, along with resistance training for a ... not take creatine. , The report is part of the December 2015 issue of ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville has implanted the ... hospital in the region providing what is known as the world’s smallest pacemaker. ... revealed recently at a medical conference and published in The New England Journal ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... to continue the expansion of the company’s growing product line of food safety ... (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) – allow InstantLabs to offer fast, reliable ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... the United States. Podiatrists are well aware that psychology-based patient non-compliance (disobedience of ... often catastrophic contributors to diseases of the diabetic foot. The American Board ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... 1, 2015  Eyeon Therapeutics has received a ... treatments based on a charged hydrophilic polymer developed ... The product has been shown to be safe ... Mark Mitchnick , MD, CEO states, "This ... additional polymers in conjunction with a therapeutic agent.  ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... 1, 2015  Athletic apparel company Tommie ... to pay $1.35 million to settle Federal Trade ... copper-infused compression clothing would relieve severe and chronic ... diseases. Tommie Copper,s proposed ... and its founder and chairman Thomas Kallish ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... diciembre de 2015  AccuTEC Blades, una ... precisión, develó hoy un nuevo logo corporativo ... El nuevo logo destaca la experiencia de ... de productos con cuchillas donde "el borde ... --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: