Navigation Links
Researchers closer to understanding actions of cells involved in atherosclerosis
Date:9/10/2012

TORONTO, Sept. 10, 2012Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital are one step closer to understanding why plaque bursts in coronary arteries and causes heart attacks.

The clue might be something called microRNA-145. MicroRNAs are short chains of bossy molecules that scientists are increasingly coming to realize control a wide variety of biological processes.

Dr. Subodh Verma, a cardiac surgeon at St. Michael's, published a paper in the journal Circulation today, describing for the first time how microRNA-145 gene therapy can drastically reduce the severity and progression of atherosclerosis in mice.

In addition this approach appeared to make the atherosclerotic plaque more stable and less prone to burst.

Atherosclerosis, commonly called hardening of the arteries, is a condition in which fat, cholesterol and other substances build up in the walls of arteries and form hard structures called plaques. It is the leading cause of death in Canada.

Dr. Verma said most heart attacks occur when plaques rupture like a broken eggshell and release their contents into the artery. Researchers are therefore looking for ways to reduce the size of plaques and make them more stable.

One of the key questions is what causes the outer layer of the plaque to finally burst a layer of smooth muscle cells known as the fibrous cap. These cells undergo "phenotypic transformation" in response to various stressful environments and cardiovascular risk factors, making them more likely to rupture and cause heart attacks.

MicroRNA-145 is one of the factors that appear to play a critical role in preventing the transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells into rupture-prone cells.

In atherosclerosis-prone animals, microRNA-145-based gene therapy reduced the plaque size by approximately 50 per cent and increased the collagen content of the plaque and fibrous cap area by 40 to 50 per cent, indicating that this therapy can reduce plaque buildup and also make it less prone to rupture, the inciting event of heart attacks.

The researchers also found that in human atherosclerotic plaques, the amount of microRNA-145 was reduced compared to normal arteries that were free of plaque, providing supporting human insights to the animal study.

"Atherosclerosis continues to be the number one killer in modern societies and finding new ways to treat this problem are needed," said Dr. Verma.

Dr. Fina Lovren, a senior research associate at St Michael's Hospital, carried out the experimental work on this project under the direction of Dr. Verma.


'/>"/>

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NIH awards $20 million over 5 years to train next generation of global health researchers
2. Researchers develop a new cell and animal model of inflammatory breast cancer
3. Researchers uncover a viable way for colorectal cancer patients to overcome drug resistance
4. Researchers Find Gene Mutations That May Be a Key to Autism
5. Researchers find evidence of banned antibiotics in poultry products
6. NJ stroke researchers report advances in spatial neglect research at AAN Conference
7. Autism by the numbers: Yale researchers examine impact of new diagnostic criteria
8. Researchers Map Brain Regions Linked to Intelligence
9. Researchers ID Genes That May Determine Mental Illness
10. Researchers Develop Blood Test for Depression
11. University of Cincinnati researchers win $3.7M grant from US Department of Defense
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... , ... April 28, 2017 , ... Getting enough sleep affects much more than energy ... going just 19 hours without sleep can compromise motor reaction time, which can increase the ... Amica Insurance is sharing the following tips from the NSF to help you sleep better ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... Fairfax, VA (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... elected volunteer board members and officers for 2017-2018. The annual board election process has ... serving on a volunteer basis. , Thomas C. Dickerson, Ed.D., FACHE, succeeds Jim Hamilton, ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... From April ... of Urgent Care Medicine will host industry leaders for the annual spring Convention ... those in the industry adapt to the issues currently affecting urgent care and ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... Overseer at The House of Yahweh in Abilene, Texas, has published a new post that ... Yisrayl says with so many titles and names for the Creator, it’s hard for many ... Scripture, backed with a lot of research, the truth is undeniable. , “If you ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... York, New York (PRWEB) , ... April 28, ... ... high-quality anti-aging skincare and advanced nutraceutical supplements, through its Nova Skin ... cream provides the hydrating benefits of a moisturizer with the power of an ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017  Cardinal Health (NYSE: ... 1 fiscal 2017 earnings per share (EPS) guidance ... 2019.  This is in conjunction with this morning,s announcement ... Vein Thrombosis and Nutritional Insufficiency businesses. Cardinal ... continuing operations will be at the bottom of its ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... April 18, 2017 Viverae ® , a ... the integration of IBM ® Watson Campaign Automation, ... targeted communications for a personalized experience. Through digital engagement, ... their health in real time. The enhanced experience drives ... to members, wherever they are in their journey to ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... DIEGO , April 18, 2017  Astute Medical, ... a case series to be presented at the 2017 ... which begins today and continues through April 22. Physicians ... IGFBP-7 , used to assess risk for acute kidney ... decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Elevated levels ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: