Navigation Links
Researchers at Case Western Reserve discover a new way the body fights fungal infection

A team of researchers led by Amy G. Hise, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor at the Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, is the first to discover how the body fights off oral yeast infections caused by the most common human fungal pathogen, Candida.

As fungal infections become more resistant to current drugs, this groundbreaking research may directly lead to the development of new drugs and therapies that will help limit and/or prevent Candida infections in the future for millions of sufferers.

Candida albicans is the most common species of the Candida fungus and is the leading cause of vaginal and oral yeast infections, including thrush and denture stomatitis. It is the fourth most common hospital acquired bloodborne pathogen in the United States and surprisingly, it is present in the mouths of 30 to 50 percent of healthy adults.

Because of the widespread nature of Candida, the potential for overgrowth and infection is common in the young, elderly, immuno-compromised and people receiving corticosteroid or chemotherapy treatments.

The findings, published in Cell, Host and Microbe, identified the critical role of a protein, interleukin-1β or IL-1β, secreted by a variety of cells in the human immune system to protect the body from oral colonization by Candida albicans and preventing it from spreading to infect host tissue and blood. The study defines the precise mechanism by which the body's immune cells produce IL-1β following contact with Candida albicans. Further, it shows that a complex of proteins, collectively termed the NLRP3 inflammasome, function to produce IL-1β from an inactive, precursor form into a form that can be secreted by cells and subsequently function to modulate the immune system and its responses.

This research clarifies a number of mechanisms and pathways that may be therapeutic targets to help alleviate and/or eliminate Candida overgrowth and its accompanying symptoms, such as pain and discomfort, swelling, burning sensation of affected area, difficulty swallowing, in individuals suffering from infections.

The findings of Dr. Hise's laboratory will open many new avenues of research in fungal infections. One direction they are pursuing is to identify the way that the fungus activates the inflammasome. This might provide new targets for drug development. Another area of interest is the investigation of how small differences between individuals in immune related genes, called single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs, affect susceptibility to fungal and other infections.

"If we can identify patterns of SNPs that make people more likely to develop life-threatening fungal infections, it may be possible in the future to use these as markers to screen patients. For example, patients admitted to intensive care units or needing long-term invasive catheters could be genetically screened to identify who would benefit from preventive anti-fungal treatment," says Dr. Hise.


Contact: Jessica Studeny
Case Western Reserve University

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
3. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
4. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
5. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
6. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
7. Researchers estimate about 9 percent of US children age 8 to 15 meet criteria for having ADHD
8. Majority of 2.4 Million U.S. Children With ADHD Not Diagnosed or Consistently Treated, According to New Gold Standard Study by Cincinnati Childrens Researchers
9. Researchers develop long-lasting growth hormone
10. Jefferson immunology researchers halt lethal rabies infection in brain
11. Purdue researchers develop technology to detect cancer by scanning surface veins
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... The hospitals and health systems on this ... care. They have received recognition for excellence from various reputable organizations in areas ... Hospital Review selected hospitals for inclusion based on national rankings and awards from ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... In response to recent news highlighting Oxycodone fraud, Novus Medical ... the United States grew 400 percent between 1999 and 2010, far more than the ... percent of all fatal drug overdoses. (1) , While oxycodone and the extended release ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... Serenity Point Rehabilitation, a holistic treatment center for substance abuse located in Marne, ... members at their recovery center. The videos highlight some of the various aspects of ... that make their recovery program so unique. , “Making the decision to seek treatment ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... Cleveland University-Kansas City (CU-KC), in Overland Park, Kansas. Benson, a fifth-trimester ... University President Carl S. Cleveland III on October 16. , “Katie is very ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 24, 2015 , ... Autism Speaks, the world’s leading autism science and advocacy ... and the generosity of people around the world. On December 1, supporters can make ... – and share the personal stories behind those gifts. , Just as Black ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... 2015  In the pharmaceutical industry, companies want to ... quickly uncover new insights, tactics and strategies that will ... --> However, organizations often find it is ... ensure that all rules and regulations are met to ... barrier to efficiently launching market research projects is the ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , 24. November 2015 Avery ... Pacemaker Systems, ist erfreut, die Berufung von ... bekannt geben zu können. ... --> Foto - ... (Schweden). Von 1984-1986 war er Fellow des ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Sectra (STO: SECT B) announces ... a multi-year agreement to deploy Breast Imaging PACS ... provide the Breast Center a future-proof platform capable of expanding ... B) announces that Breast Center of Acadiana has ... Imaging PACS in its two freestanding imaging centers. This investment ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: