Navigation Links
Researchers Who Discovered First Genes for Stuttering will Present Findings to the National Stuttering Association
Date:2/11/2010

Implications that speech problems may be an inherited metabolic disorder will be discussed during the July 2010 Conference and Research Symposium.

(Vocus) February 11, 2010 -- Stuttering may be the result of a glitch in the day-to-day process by which cellular components in key regions of the brain are broken down and recycled, says a study in the Feb. 10 Online First issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“This is a very exciting discovery,” said National Stuttering Association (NSA) Chairman Ernie Canadeo. “It validates our view that stuttering has a genetic component, and that it is not behavioral. Emotional factors do not cause stuttering.”

The study, led by researchers at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified three genes as a source of stuttering in volunteers from Pakistan, the United States, and England.

“The study provides further evidence that stuttering is not a behavioral disorder but has as its origins—genetics manifesting in abnormal neuronal activity. We have learned much recently from brain imaging and pharmacologic studies that stuttering is associated with abnormal neurophysiology—how this relates directly to lysosomal function is an area which we definitely need to research further,” said Gerald A. Maguire, M.D. Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Kirkup Endowed Chair in Stuttering Treatment, Senior Associate Dean, Educational Affairs, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine.

Stuttering tends to run in families and researchers have long suspected a genetic component. Previous studies of stuttering in a group of families from Pakistan had been done by Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., a geneticist with the NIDCD who led the latest research.

“These findings will help with early identification of stuttering so children can get the therapy and support they need at an early age, which can often lead to better outcomes,” said John A. Tetnowski, Ph. D, CCC-SLP, Director of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette and an NSA Board Member.

Dr. Drayna and Dr. McGuire gave presentations, moderated by Dr. Tetnowski, at the National Stuttering Association’s Research Symposium in Arizona last year and are scheduled to present the implications of these new findings on people who stutter at the NSA’s Conference and Research Symposium in Cleveland this July. Over 600 people who stutter, their families, speech language pathologists, and others interested in stuttering typically attend the conference each year.

Stuttering is a speech disorder in which a person repeats or prolongs sounds, syllables, or words, disrupting the normal flow of speech. It can severely hinder communication and a person's quality of life. Most children who stutter will outgrow stuttering, although many do not; roughly one percent of adults stutter worldwide. Current therapies for adults who stutter have focused on such strategies as reducing anxiety, regulating breathing and rate of speech, and using electronic devices to help improve fluency.

The National Stuttering Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing hope and empowerment to children and adults who stutter, their families, and professionals through support, education, advocacy, and research. It is represented by over 100 local chapters and support programs for children, families, teens, and adults throughout the United States. It was established in 1977. For more information, visit www.westutter.org.

###

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/02/prweb3595944.htm.


'/>"/>
Source: PRWeb
Copyright©2010 Vocus, Inc.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
2. UH Case Medical Center researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer
3. Researchers map all the fragile sites of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiaes genome
4. UCSF Researchers Identify Regulator of Human Sperm Cells
5. Researchers find broad spectrum antiviral that fights multitude of viruses
6. Caregivers of ICU patients are collateral damage of critical illness, say Pitt researchers
7. Researchers fight world hunger by mapping the soybean genome
8. HIV researchers solve key puzzle after 20 years of trying
9. UC Davis researchers identify brain protein for synapse development
10. UCLA cancer researchers perform complete genomic sequencing of brain cancer cell line
11. Researchers find new way to study how enzymes repair DNA damage
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/21/2017)... , ... August 21, 2017 , ... ... addition of two plastic surgery fellows for academic year 2017-2018, Christina M. Busuito, ... who have successfully completed residency in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The candidate ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... California (PRWEB) , ... August 21, 2017 , ... Five ... money and awareness for Alzheimer’s Family Center. , Guests will be able to ... Newport Beach Plaza, Braised Lamb Shank with Fennel Dill Salad, Feta Cheese Sauce & ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 21, 2017 , ... The experts ... exactly are we supposed to get things done in a healthy way these days? ... they’re launching a crowdfunding campaign on August 28 to introduce Deskcise Pro™– the world’s ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... ... August 21, 2017 , ... San Diego physician and surgeon Dr. James ... has announced his candidacy for the 52nd Congressional District currently held by Representative Scott ... Coming to this country at age eleven after suffering homelessness and hardship in a ...
(Date:8/20/2017)... ANGELES, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... August 20, 2017 , ... A total solar eclipse ... darken for a few minutes as the moon moves between the sun and Earth. This ... , These four tips can help keep you safe on the road during the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/4/2017)... -- Agragen, LLC, a Cincinnati -based ... and aquacultural feed sectors, announces a significant step ... AGR131.  This drug is designed to trap and ... patients suffering from inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid ... Biological pharmaceuticals currently used ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... MEMPHIS, Tenn. and BENTON, Ky. , Aug. 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... new member to its environmental services (ES) team to proactively reduce the risk of hospital-acquired ... is a UV disinfection robot that uses UVC light energy to kill deadly pathogens such ... ... Tru-D ...
(Date:8/1/2017)... , Aug. 1, 2017   CerSci Therapeutics , ... Dallas, Texas , has received notice from the ... Institutes of Health (NIH) that it has been awarded ... totaling over $650,000 in 2017 with an additional $1,000,000 ... Investigational New Drug application of their lead non-opioid drug ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: