Navigation Links
Researchers Suggest That Oxidative Stress is Strongly Evident in the In-Utero Environment of the Fetus With Down Syndrome
Date:6/2/2009

Abnormal gene expression in amniotic fluid could play role in suggesting potential therapies

BOSTON, June 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/05/27/0903909106) by Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University researchers reports that amniotic fluid surrounding Down syndrome fetuses shows oxidative stress, a condition that could harm fetal cells and play a role in affected individuals. The results demonstrate secondary adverse consequences of Down syndrome and suggest potential prenatal therapies.

Diana Bianchi, M.D., Vice Chair for Research, Department of Pediatrics at Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center, and Donna Slonim, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science at Tufts University, conducted an analysis of the human genome from cell-free fetal messenger RNA in amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. Their team identified molecular and biochemical pathway changes that were evident in the Down syndrome fetuses as compared to normal fetuses as early as the fourth month of pregnancy.

Down syndrome occurs when an individual has three copies of chromosome 21 instead of two. The longstanding assumption has been that proteins produced by the additional copy of chromosome 21 were almost exclusively responsible for the atypical development and function associated with the syndrome. A surprising aspect of the findings was that the molecular abnormalities observed were predominantly produced by genes on the other chromosomes.

As a next step, researchers are examining amniotic cells to determine if they show similar genomic profiles to the cell-free material in the fluid. If that is the case, they will begin to look at the effectiveness of anti-oxidant compounds as potential treatment in vitro.

"While more research is needed, this study illuminates a possible pathway to treating some aspects of Down syndrome in the womb," Bianchi said. "While we do not know the extent to which the developing fetus is affected by oxidative stress, we know this abnormal environment is not conducive to optimal development."

The analysis relied heavily on computer analysis and bioinformatics. To support their conclusions, the researchers applied the Connectivity Map, a tool linking information about genomics and FDA-approved compounds to suggest drug therapies for various disease pathways. This approach implicated the same underlying processes, and suggests directions for future work.


'/>"/>
SOURCE Tufts Medical Center
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers call for new space headache category following astronauts survey
2. Outsmarting Brain Tumors: Cedars-Sinai Researchers, Neurosurgeons and Other Experts Present Free Conference for Adult Brain Tumor Patients and Caregivers
3. U-M researchers link pathway to breast cancer stem cells
4. Researchers determine predicting factors of positive lung cancer diagnoses in chest radiographs
5. Researchers Spot Genes Linked to Testicular Cancer
6. UCLA cancer researchers first to link intestinal inflammation with systemic chromosome damage
7. Pitt melanoma researchers present novel findings at ASCO
8. Researchers develop light-treatment device to improve sleep quality in the elderly
9. MU researchers offer insights for advancing health communication through digital media
10. Mayo researchers help discover genetic cause for primary biliary cirrhosis
11. BUSM researchers find no adjustment method fully resolves confounding by indication
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... concussion rates are on the rise, say researchers presenting their work at the ... Ontario, Canada. , “The combination of evaluating the patterns of change in concussion ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... , ... ChenMed , a leading provider of value-based care for seniors, ... as Richmond Chief Medical Officer. Dr. McCarter, formerly Associate Professor of Family Medicine ... Ambulatory Services for the UVA Health System, brings 30 years of highly relevant experience ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... NY, July 20, 2017 (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Nastel Technologies, a global provider of enterprise-grade IT operations analytics and application ... arm of one of world’s largest healthcare services providers. , According to ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... For individuals with extended hospital stays or who are residents ... facilities are specially designed to accommodate patients with a wide range of ailments or ... Rochester, Ind., has invented the patent-pending PORTABLE ARM REST, a specially designed armrest that ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 20, 2017 , ... Team Type ... access to medicine for everyone affected by diabetes, is teaming up with a Microsoft ... global event kicks off on July 24th. , “Team Type 1’s mission overlaps ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/10/2017)... July 10, 2017  The tenth annual BioPharm ... MA at the Sheraton Boston Hotel, September ... access to global decision makers and innovative biotech startup ... science leaders during two impactful days. BioPharm America is ... with additional networking opportunities with 4,500+ life science industry ...
(Date:7/5/2017)... of over 2,000 employees and a leader in environmental and life science testing, ... position as the top American owned and operated environmental testing firm in ... ... The ... , enhances Pace Analytical,s capability as an innovative full service provider in the ...
(Date:6/30/2017)... POINT, N.C. , June 29, 2017  Axium Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... for developing improved novel formulations and alternative dosage forms of ... ... delivery is based on our waterless self-nano emulsifying formula, which ... contact with saliva. We believe the spray will provide fast ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: