Navigation Links
Researchers Suggest That Oxidative Stress is Strongly Evident in the In-Utero Environment of the Fetus With Down Syndrome
Date:6/2/2009

Abnormal gene expression in amniotic fluid could play role in suggesting potential therapies

BOSTON, June 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/05/27/0903909106) by Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University researchers reports that amniotic fluid surrounding Down syndrome fetuses shows oxidative stress, a condition that could harm fetal cells and play a role in affected individuals. The results demonstrate secondary adverse consequences of Down syndrome and suggest potential prenatal therapies.

Diana Bianchi, M.D., Vice Chair for Research, Department of Pediatrics at Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center, and Donna Slonim, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science at Tufts University, conducted an analysis of the human genome from cell-free fetal messenger RNA in amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. Their team identified molecular and biochemical pathway changes that were evident in the Down syndrome fetuses as compared to normal fetuses as early as the fourth month of pregnancy.

Down syndrome occurs when an individual has three copies of chromosome 21 instead of two. The longstanding assumption has been that proteins produced by the additional copy of chromosome 21 were almost exclusively responsible for the atypical development and function associated with the syndrome. A surprising aspect of the findings was that the molecular abnormalities observed were predominantly produced by genes on the other chromosomes.

As a next step, researchers are examining amniotic cells to determine if they show similar genomic profiles to the cell-free material in the fluid. If that is the case, they will begin to look at the effectiveness of anti-oxidant compounds as potential treatment in vitro.

"While more research is needed, this study illuminates a possible pathway to treating some aspects of Down syndrome in the womb," Bianchi said. "While we do not know the extent to which the developing fetus is affected by oxidative stress, we know this abnormal environment is not conducive to optimal development."

The analysis relied heavily on computer analysis and bioinformatics. To support their conclusions, the researchers applied the Connectivity Map, a tool linking information about genomics and FDA-approved compounds to suggest drug therapies for various disease pathways. This approach implicated the same underlying processes, and suggests directions for future work.


'/>"/>
SOURCE Tufts Medical Center
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers call for new space headache category following astronauts survey
2. Outsmarting Brain Tumors: Cedars-Sinai Researchers, Neurosurgeons and Other Experts Present Free Conference for Adult Brain Tumor Patients and Caregivers
3. U-M researchers link pathway to breast cancer stem cells
4. Researchers determine predicting factors of positive lung cancer diagnoses in chest radiographs
5. Researchers Spot Genes Linked to Testicular Cancer
6. UCLA cancer researchers first to link intestinal inflammation with systemic chromosome damage
7. Pitt melanoma researchers present novel findings at ASCO
8. Researchers develop light-treatment device to improve sleep quality in the elderly
9. MU researchers offer insights for advancing health communication through digital media
10. Mayo researchers help discover genetic cause for primary biliary cirrhosis
11. BUSM researchers find no adjustment method fully resolves confounding by indication
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The ... in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants to support its ... PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their pencils and honing their writing ... which patients and their families pay tribute to a genetic counselor by nominating him ... Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. , In April, Genome ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... National recruitment firm ... sciences executive with extensive sequencing and genomics experience, as Vice President of North American ... Hill will be responsible for leading the sales team in the commercialization of the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... To succeed under value-based payments, ... are unsure how to move forward, given the need to sustain current operations. ... tailored to an organization’s specific needs. , PYA Principal Martie Ross states, “Healthcare ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Terumo BCT, ... organization responsible for clinical transfusion research programs and for the blood supply in ... Evaluation and Predictive Analytical Rating Score (PREPAReS) study. , Currently in its ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... Calif. , June 24, 2016  American Respiratory Labs (ARL), ... is now able to perform sophisticated lung assessments in patients, homes, ... , Inc. Patients are no longer limited to ... EasyOne PRO ® , ARL patients like Jeanne R. of ... in the comfort of her own home. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ... company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that it ... Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of U.S. ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," said ... increase shareholder awareness of our progress in developing drugs ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016  MedSource announced today that it has ... solution of choice.  This latest decision demonstrates MedSource,s ... their clients by offering a state-of-the-art electronic data ... nowEDC as the EDC platform of choice in ... "nowEDC has long been a preferred EDC platform ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: