Navigation Links
Researchers Identify Novel Mechanism That Make Cancer Tumors Grow
Date:2/10/2009

Scientists at the Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research (IMBCR) have uncovered a new pathway that could explain how blood vessels form within tumors.

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- IMBCR researchers uncovered a new way that cancers orchestrate the production of their own blood supply. Recent studies have shown that many tumors make a protein called pleiotrophin (PTN). They now show that PTN produced by tumor cells in multiple myeloma, a common form of bone marrow-based cancer, changes white cells in the blood called "monocytes" into cells that form the lining of blood vessels called "vascular endothelial cells" (VEC). These VEC cells then become incorporated into the blood vessels that form within tumors.

"This is exciting news, and we feel this will not only have a tremendous impact on hematological tumors, such as myeloma, but other cancers as well," said James R. Berenson, M.D., Medical and Scientific Director of the IMBCR. "By uncovering this unique mechanism, how PTN produced by cancers actually changes circulating white cells into cells that line blood vessels that feed the tumor, we can direct our efforts to create more targeted approaches to eliminate blood supplies for cancers which should dramatically improve therapies for many types of cancers."

Haiming Chen, M.D., Ph.D. is the first author of the research, published this week on the cover of BLOOD. Drs. Berenson and Chen collaborated with scientists at Hemaquest, the Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine and Cell Biology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Departments of Neurosurgery, Pathology, and Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Part of IMBCR's multi-year research project, "Cure Myeloma Project," this research was funded by grants from the Skirball and Annenberg Foundations, Kramer Family Foundation and the Myeloma Research Fund.

About IMBCR

The Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research is a non-profit organization headquartered in Los Angeles, California. IMBCR is the only independent cancer research institute working to find improved treatment, and ultimately a cure for multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood cells that reside in the bone marrow.

IMBCR research has been published in most major oncology journals; Journal of Clinical Oncology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma, Oncogene, and the British Journal of Haematology. www.imbcr.org


'/>"/>
SOURCE Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
3. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
4. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
5. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
6. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
7. Researchers estimate about 9 percent of US children age 8 to 15 meet criteria for having ADHD
8. Majority of 2.4 Million U.S. Children With ADHD Not Diagnosed or Consistently Treated, According to New Gold Standard Study by Cincinnati Childrens Researchers
9. Researchers develop long-lasting growth hormone
10. Jefferson immunology researchers halt lethal rabies infection in brain
11. Purdue researchers develop technology to detect cancer by scanning surface veins
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/30/2016)... ... April 30, 2016 , ... Create ... Abstract users can distort and manipulate three-dimensional shapes with ease all within ... ranks, point, lines, polygons, polygon texture animation, opacity texture animation, overall shape texture ...
(Date:4/30/2016)... , ... April 30, 2016 ... ... CBC News on April 4th, 2016 questioned the use of the HyProCure ... EOTTS-HyProCure as “a controversial procedure.” EOTTS-HyProCure is a minimally invasive procedure performed, ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... In an article published April ... enthusiasm for Botox and lip injections, which she underwent in order to feel more ... Music and Arts Festival. The article explains that Ms. Mirmelli’s situation is not unique; ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... On Tuesday, April 26, 2016 members of the ... signature of Gov. Nathan Deal on SB 258, the “Rural Health Care Relief” Bill. ... a 70% tax credit to individuals and corporations which donate directly to a “rural ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Coast Dental ... 16, 2016, at its new location in the Exchange Furniture Mall at 112 Vilseck ... for a 50-inch Samsung Smart TV. Plus attendees will have the opportunity to meet ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... 2016 Automation is one of ... to the growing demands for productivity in speed, accuracy, ... systems are already adept of a wide range of ... manual labor. Instrumentation continues to evolve, and is poised ... a few years ago. Originally used mostly by the ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016  While Abbott,s announced purchase ... company,s valve repair and stent business, healthcare research ... Abbott more firmly into patient monitoring.  Kalorama said ... growing device areas, with double-digit growth expected the ... Advanced Remote Patient Monitoring . Abbott ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016  Marking its one year ... and ovarian cancer risk test, Color Genomics ... genes that highly impact the most common hereditary ... the Color Test analyzes hereditary cancer risks for ... uterine cancers. The Color Test is physician ordered ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: