Navigation Links
Researcher wins $1.2 million grant for gene regulation work
Date:1/9/2009

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- A unique discovery in a Florida State University College of Medicine laboratory is the basis for research with the potential to one day help scientists learn how to stop cancer and other diseases in the tissue where they are forming.

Jamila Horabin, associate professor of biomedical sciences at the College of Medicine, has received a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to pursue her work. Horabin recently discovered a direct link between RNA silencing and the genetic master switch controlling the sex determination process in fruit flies.

With that knowledge, she is now seeking to fully understand how a cellular process in gene regulation called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) might interfere with or silence the genes assumed to be at work in nearly all forms of disease and cancer. With a greater understanding of the process, her hope is that scientists will one day be able to switch off the gene activity causing cancerous tumors and cardiovascular disease.

"We want to know how RNA silencing affects fundamental gene expression," Horabin said. "Many genes are regulated by this process, and it will have far-reaching impact if we understand how it works, which is really the hope and dream of a basic scientist."

Myra Hurt, associate dean for research and graduate programs at the College of Medicine, said Horabin's work has great potential for finding a new way of fighting disease.

"There are a number of genes involved with tumor development and metastasis, for example," Hurt said. "Imagine if you could target those genes and silence them in the tissue where they are. Here is one more layer of gene regulation that we really didn't know about until fairly recently, and now if we can understand it maybe we can use this technology to target genes involved in disease conditions very specifically and silence them."

The fruit fly offers numerous advantages for such research. Its genome has been fully mapped, so every gene is known and can be studied for cause and effect relationships in the laboratory. Additionally, the fruit fly reaches full maturity in a matter of days, is plentiful, inexpensive and, most importantly, shares remarkable similarities to humans at the level where gene activity is regulated.

"Sometimes you find that the fly gene that you are working with is similar to a human gene that is involved in directing a disease," Horabin said. "So if the fly gene is being regulated in a particular way, then odds are the human gene is being regulated the very same way."


'/>"/>

Contact: Doug Carlson
doug.carlson@med.fsu.edu
850-645-1255
Florida State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
5. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
6. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
7. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
8. Researchers estimate about 9 percent of US children age 8 to 15 meet criteria for having ADHD
9. Majority of 2.4 Million U.S. Children With ADHD Not Diagnosed or Consistently Treated, According to New Gold Standard Study by Cincinnati Childrens Researchers
10. Researchers develop long-lasting growth hormone
11. UVa researcher awarded $3.6 million grant to fight drug-resistant bacteria
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Somnoware, a leading provider ... care management module. Using this new feature, sleep physicians can now predict the ... continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), oral, or other forms of sleep apnea therapy. ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... Emmanuel College ... nursing professionals advance their careers. Beginning in the fall of 2017, Emmanuel’s program will ... in as few as 16 months and for as little as $14,528. These changes ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... As part of the nationwide Days of Remembrance effort led ... Holocaust and Nazi persecution, Center for Medicine after the Holocaust (CMATH) announced ... trip to Germany and Poland next week. , The Fourth Biennial CMATH Champions Trip ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Sean Fay is the undisputed king of the infomercial. With ... the George Foreman Grill (which sold more than 100 million units worldwide), he has ... , Now, due to changes in the broadcast media landscape, the once ever-present infomercial ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... , ... My T Chai, a South African company that creates a number ... RevNutrition.com, a popular website specializing in sales of nutritional products. , Chai tea ... Siam. It spread across Asia and Africa quickly, and today recipes vary from region ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)...  Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZBH), ... it will be participating in the Deutsche Bank Securities ... in Boston, Massachusetts on Wednesday, ... a.m. Eastern Time. A live webcast of ... Relations website at http://investor.zimmerbiomet.com .  The webcast will ...
(Date:4/20/2017)...  CVS Pharmacy, the retail division of CVS ... design to enhance the retail customer experience with ... and expanded beauty selections paired with informational signage ... offerings. Together with its innovative digital programs, these ... experience at CVS Pharmacy.  "Pharmacy ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... April 20, 2017 Eyevensys, a ... first non-viral gene expression technology that enables the safe, ... to address a wide range of ophthalmic diseases, announces ... Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to advance its technology ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: