Navigation Links
Researcher wins $1.2 million grant for gene regulation work
Date:1/9/2009

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- A unique discovery in a Florida State University College of Medicine laboratory is the basis for research with the potential to one day help scientists learn how to stop cancer and other diseases in the tissue where they are forming.

Jamila Horabin, associate professor of biomedical sciences at the College of Medicine, has received a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to pursue her work. Horabin recently discovered a direct link between RNA silencing and the genetic master switch controlling the sex determination process in fruit flies.

With that knowledge, she is now seeking to fully understand how a cellular process in gene regulation called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) might interfere with or silence the genes assumed to be at work in nearly all forms of disease and cancer. With a greater understanding of the process, her hope is that scientists will one day be able to switch off the gene activity causing cancerous tumors and cardiovascular disease.

"We want to know how RNA silencing affects fundamental gene expression," Horabin said. "Many genes are regulated by this process, and it will have far-reaching impact if we understand how it works, which is really the hope and dream of a basic scientist."

Myra Hurt, associate dean for research and graduate programs at the College of Medicine, said Horabin's work has great potential for finding a new way of fighting disease.

"There are a number of genes involved with tumor development and metastasis, for example," Hurt said. "Imagine if you could target those genes and silence them in the tissue where they are. Here is one more layer of gene regulation that we really didn't know about until fairly recently, and now if we can understand it maybe we can use this technology to target genes involved in disease conditions very specifically and silence them."

The fruit fly offers numerous advantages for such research. Its genome has been fully mapped, so every gene is known and can be studied for cause and effect relationships in the laboratory. Additionally, the fruit fly reaches full maturity in a matter of days, is plentiful, inexpensive and, most importantly, shares remarkable similarities to humans at the level where gene activity is regulated.

"Sometimes you find that the fly gene that you are working with is similar to a human gene that is involved in directing a disease," Horabin said. "So if the fly gene is being regulated in a particular way, then odds are the human gene is being regulated the very same way."


'/>"/>

Contact: Doug Carlson
doug.carlson@med.fsu.edu
850-645-1255
Florida State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
5. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
6. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
7. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
8. Researchers estimate about 9 percent of US children age 8 to 15 meet criteria for having ADHD
9. Majority of 2.4 Million U.S. Children With ADHD Not Diagnosed or Consistently Treated, According to New Gold Standard Study by Cincinnati Childrens Researchers
10. Researchers develop long-lasting growth hormone
11. UVa researcher awarded $3.6 million grant to fight drug-resistant bacteria
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/22/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... September 22, 2017 , ... ... to help you brush more effectively even on the go. Their electric toothbrushes ... gingivitis and gum inflammation, with UV sanitizing technology. Combining leading edge Enke technology ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... September 22, 2017 , ... Global Lyme Alliance ... research, education and awareness, today announced the appointment of Timothy J. Sellati, Ph.D. ... Sellati has more than 20 years of research experience with Lyme and other ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... 21, 2017 , ... The American Addiction Treatment Association (AATA) ... in the addiction treatment industry entitled: Special Investigations Unit (SIU) – What ... state and federal governments are increasingly scrutinizing the addiction treatment industry for fraudulent ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... , ... In addition to sticking with the new years ... and use natural alternatives for all house cleaning products, disinfectants, respiratory relief, and ... the new line of essential oils, are all 100% organic and natural. , ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... RICHMOND, Va. (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 ... ... Richmond with a different approach to addiction recovery at a time when Virginia ... 1,420 deaths resulting from drug overdose, a staggering increase of 38 percent from ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/6/2017)...  Medical professionals are expected to continuously ... their patients. Medical simulations offer clinicians the ... Simulation provides a safe method for teaching ... refine techniques and build confidence, without putting ... such as augmented reality, will now provide ...
(Date:9/5/2017)... 5, 2017  Xyntek Inc. has announced another milestone in their continued growth ... to meet the growing demands of customer engagements regionally.  ... Xyntek's new Midwest office is located at 318 West Adams Street, Suite ... Xyntek's ... ...
(Date:9/1/2017)... , Sept. 1, 2017  Explorers Like Us ( https://explorerslikeus.com/ ... greatest aural experiences — and deliver these experiences as part ... help people feel and heal better. ... While nothing beats a walk, jog ... your mind, Life Environments™ is the next best thing when ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: