Navigation Links
Research reveals molecular fingerprint of cocaine addiction
Date:5/27/2008

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. The first large-scale analysis of proteins in the brains of monkeys addicted to cocaine reveals new information on how long-term cocaine use changes the amount and activity of various proteins affecting brain function.

The identified changes are more numerous and long-lasting than previously thought, which may provide a biological explanation for why cocaine addiction is so difficult to overcome, according to Scott E. Hemby, Ph.D. of Wake Forest University School of Medicine, senior author of the study.

Results from the study are reported online today (May 27) in the journal Molecular Psychiatry and detail the effect of long-term cocaine intake on the amount and activity of thousands of proteins in monkeys. Monkeys are an ideal animal for studying addiction because they share considerable behavioral, anatomical and biochemical similarities with humans. About 2.4 million Americans currently use cocaine, according to estimates.

The researchers used state-of-the-art proteomic technology, which enables the simultaneous analysis of thousands of proteins, to compare the proteome (all proteins expressed at a given time) between a group of monkeys that self-administered cocaine and a group that did not receive the drug. Leonard Howell, Ph.D., with Emory University School of Medicine, who conducted the monkey studies, was a co-researcher. The study provides a comprehensive assessment of biochemical changes occurring in the cocaine addicted brain, Hemby said.

The changes we identified are profound and affect the structure, metabolism and signaling of neurons, said lead author Nilesh Tannu, M.D. It is unlikely that these types of changes are easily reversible after drug use is discontinued, which may explain why relapse occurs.

Hemby said that the development of medications to treat addictive disorders is guided in large part by our understanding of the brain mechanisms that produce the euphoric effects of the drugs. It is equally important to understand the damage that long-term drug use causes to brain cells so medications can be developed to reverse those effects and restore normal cell function in the brain.

The changes identified in the current study point to significant and likely long-lasting damage to brain cells as a result of cocaine abuse. The duration of use and the amount of drug consumed that lead to such damage is currently not known, but is critical for understanding the long-term health consequences of cocaine abuse and determining the necessary modes of treatment, said Hemby. We hope that the information generated from the study will also serve an educational purpose as a deterrent to cocaine use.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4453
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Video/Online Games for Health: 12 Research Teams From Across U.S. To Receive Major Grants
2. SNM hosts 55th Annual Meeting of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Research
3. AlphaRx Signs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with US Army
4. UCLA researchers identify leukemia stem cells
5. £20M health research collaboration announced for the southwest England
6. Organic Farming Research Foundation Applauds Farm Bill Victories for Organic Farmers and Ranchers
7. Increased screening may better predict those at higher risk for heart disease, researchers report
8. Mayo Clinic researchers find common gene disorder doubles risk of lung cancer, even among nonsmokers
9. Researchers find roadmap to next-generation cancer therapies
10. Bioniche Presents Pre-Clinical Research at Two International Conferences
11. Monitoring blood flow helps improve prostate biopsies, Jefferson researchers report
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... Lice Troopers, the lice removal company based in South Florida, has seen ... season. , “It happens every year around this time,” says owner, Arie Harel. ... is the head-to-head gateway that lice need to spread.” , As children return to ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... FL (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... International ... of nutritional and bodybuilding supplements, announced it attended the January ECRM trade show in ... bodybuilder and nutritional scientist who was determined to create a line of products that ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... , ... "TransFlare 4K Mystique comes with 44 colorful mysterious transitions that are ... Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , TransFlare 4K Mystique contains 44 ... flare and light leak transitions have a very high-dynamic range for super smooth falloff. ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Mary Magdalene: ... the mysterious life of the woman who witnessed Jesus Christ firsthand. “Mary Magdalene: Grace ... denizen, who spent her career as an educator interacting with countless women who had ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “Code Word: Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account following a man who went on ... of published author, Marlyn Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, Florida and at the age of ... 19 years of age, he joined the Navy and got married right out of boot ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/21/2017)... According to a new market research report "Life Science Analytics ... (Software, Service), Delivery (On premise, Cloud), End user (Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, Medical ... is expected to reach USD 24.73 Billion by 2021 from USD ... forecast period. Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition ... BMP, BUN Creatinine, Electrolyte Testing, HbA1c Testing, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel, Liver ... - 2024" report to their offering. ... The global clinical laboratory testing market ... Introduction of innovative solutions on the grounds of maximum efficiency and ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... BUFFALO, N.Y. , Jan. 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... health programs, has announced the launch of an ... to new guidelines on opioids and helps stem ... Opioids are often prescribed to treat chronic non-cancer ... disease) despite serious risks and lack of evidence ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: