Navigation Links
Research gives hope to detecting cancer in early stages

Research from Queen Mary, University of London has uncovered the mechanism which causes normal cells to develop into cancer, giving hope in the fight against one of the UK's biggest killers*.

The study, published in the online journal PLoS ONE today (26 March), investigated the role of the notorious cancer gene FOXM1.

Lead investigator Dr Muy-Teck Teh from Queen Mary, University of London, said the team found that the FOXM1 gene "brain washes" normal cells so they adopt a 'memory' pattern similar to cancer cells.

"This research has important clinical implications for early cancer diagnosis, prevention and treatment.

"We knew the FOXM1 gene is present in almost all different types of human cancers so we wanted to understand how excessive levels of it cause normal cells to become cancer-like."

Dr Teh's team used a gene-chip microarray technology to investigate the DNA 'memory' patterns in cells.

Normal cells inherit specific instructions or 'memory' patterns by masking and unmasking parts of their DNA. Maintaining the correct memory patterns is important for normal cell function - disturbing the memory pattern can lead to cancer formation.

"We knew that excess expression of FOXM1 can lead to cancer but its underlying mechanism was not clear," Dr Teh explained.

"We looked at normal human mouth cells and introduced high levels of FOXM1. The normal cells changed to adopt a memory pattern similar to those in mouth cancer cells and we identified a number of key pattern changes that may be responsible for initiating cancer formation.

"These pattern changes may lead to the identification of biomarkers which could be developed into new diagnostic tests. We are currently working towards developing a practical diagnostic test for detecting mouth cancer at very early stages."

The team's research, funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Facial Surgery Research Foundation, Saving Faces, means that it will be easier to detect changes in cells before they develop into cancer.

Consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon Professor Iain Hutchison, founder of Saving Faces and co-author on the study, said: "We are excited about this finding as it means that we can now detect changes in cells way before they become cancer cells.

"Mouth cancer, if detected early when the disease is most receptive to surgical treatment, has a very high cure rate. Understanding how a gene such as FOXM1 can convert normal cells into cancer is an important step towards finding new diagnostic tests for early cancer detection."

This study builds on previous studies Dr Teh and his team has done on FOXM1. Published in 2009, Dr Teh found that nicotine could activate FOXM1 and that excessive levels could cause normal human mouth cells to develop into cancer. His research on FOXM1 was awarded 'Molecule of the Year 2010' by the International Society for Molecular and Cell Biology and Biotechnology Protocols and Research for its pivotal role in cancer stem-cell biology.


Contact: Bridget Dempsey
Queen Mary, University of London

Related medicine news :

1. Embedded Mobile & M2M Device revenues to Rise to Almost $19 Billion Globally by 2014, Says Juniper Research
2. 2010 HSR Impact Award recognizes surgical safety research
3. MSU launches first anti-counterfeiting research program
4. Researchers map all the fragile sites of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiaes genome
5. UH Case Medical Center researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer
6. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
7. Family Research Council: Planned Parenthood Report Oversexualizes Ten-Year-Olds, Undermines Parental Authority
8. Michael J. Fox Foundation Awards $1 Million to Drive Critical New Research Tools and Technologies in Parkinsons Drug Development
9. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
10. International Diabetes Federation awards $2 million to 9 global diabetes research projects
11. Gladstones Robert Mahley to receive Research!America advocacy award
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... payment industry today announced its strategic partnership with Connance, a healthcare industry ... The two companies’ proven, proprietary technology combine to provide health systems, hospitals ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... recently awarded their highest five-star rating to Best ... individuals in the United States and Canada wear eyeglasses. Once considered to be a ... and make a fashion statement. Even celebrities use glasses as a way of creating ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... On ... as sponsor of the 2016 Cereal Festival and World’s Longest Breakfast Table in Battle ... honor of the city’s history as home to some of the world’s leading providers ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... PawPaws brand pet supplements owned by Whole Health ... the health of felines. The formula is all-natural and is made from Chinese herbs ... Cat Kidney Support Supplement Soft Chews are Astragalus Root Extract and Rehmannia ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women need a treatment plan to ... a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation of fertility and ultimately achieving ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... , June 26, 2016 ... value-based care operating models within the health care industry ... greater financial efficiency , Deloitte offers a suite ... key business issues impacting efficient cost optimization: labor resource ... , These services facilitate better outcomes and better economics ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016  Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc. (GBT) ... developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of grievous ... the closing of its previously announced underwritten public ... the public offering price of $18.75 per share. ... offered by GBT. GBT estimates net proceeds from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 ... of the "Structural Electronics 2015-2025: Applications, Technologies, ... In-Mold Electronics, Smart Skin, ... Photovoltaics Structural electronics involves electronic ... load-bearing, protective structures, replacing dumb structures such as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: