Navigation Links
Research demonstrates why going green is good chemistry
Date:4/8/2013

Shaken, not stirred, is the essence of new research that's showing promise in creating the chemical reactions necessary for industries such as pharmaceutical companies, but eliminating the resulting waste from traditional methods. James Mack, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of chemistry, will present this research into greener chemistry on April 9, at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

Instead of using solutions to create chemical reactions needed to manufacture products such as detergents, plastics and pharmaceuticals, Mack is using a physical catalyst high-speed ball-milling to force chemicals to come together to create these reactions. The mechanochemistry not only eliminates waste, but also is showing more success than liquids at forcing chemical reactions.

Traditional methods dating back thousands of years involve using solutions to speed up chemical reactions that are used to make products that we use every day. However, the leftover waste or solvents can often be a volatile compound, explains Mack.

Disposal and recycling is also becoming a growing and more costly challenge for companies as they follow increasing federal regulations to protect the environment. "The solvents comprise the large majority of chemicals that are handled, but the solvent doesn't do anything but serve as a mixing vehicle. For example, for every gram of pharmaceutical drug that is generated, 15 to 20 kilograms of solvent waste is generated in that process," Mack says.

"Mechanochemistry can develop new reactions that we haven't seen before, saving on waste and developing new science," Mack says.

Mack also will report on how he has used a metal reactor vial to create chemical reactions, allowing recovery of the catalyst used to make the reaction, which usually can't be achieved by using solutions. He also is exploring efforts at using natural chiral agents agents that are non-superimposable, mirror images of each other to successfully mix chemicals and eliminate waste such as oil.

Mack's research was supported by a $367,835 grant from the National Science Foundation that was awarded in 2011 and funded through 2014. His research received a highly competitive, $550,000 NSF CAREER Award in 2006. The CAREER Award is the NSF's most prestigious award in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UCLA Brain Injury Research Center gets NCAA funding for research on sports concussions
2. NIH awards $20 million over 5 years to train next generation of global health researchers
3. Researchers develop a new cell and animal model of inflammatory breast cancer
4. Researchers uncover a viable way for colorectal cancer patients to overcome drug resistance
5. Sexually abused boys at risk for more unsafe sex: UBC research
6. Researchers Find Gene Mutations That May Be a Key to Autism
7. LSUHSC research finds HPV-related head & neck cancers rising, highest in middle-aged white men
8. Researchers find evidence of banned antibiotics in poultry products
9. Presidential keynote address and new research highlights from the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology meeting
10. Scientific session and new research highlights
11. NJ stroke researchers report advances in spatial neglect research at AAN Conference
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/7/2016)... Hamden, CT (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... has prompted an outpouring of comments on social media that offer a rare glimpse ... adult psychiatrist, leading ADHD authority and New York Times bestselling author, has described people ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... 2016 , ... They are musicians and librarians, fashion designers and fitness instructors, ... New England and around the nation. What do they have in common? All have ... beautiful and compelling new photographic exhibit debuting Friday, December 9 at Logan International Airport ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... is now promoting to the US market its advanced highly customizable contact technology ... and ODU TURNTAC®. These advanced technologies are ideal for a wide range of ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... consultation services to residents in the Sacramento/Folsom region, is initiating a charity event ... , The Another Choice Another Chance treatment center in Sacramento works to provide ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... PA (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... One ... regular changing of the securement tape is painful for her. "This is why the ... to patients’ heads," she said. , They then created a prototype of the patent-pending ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... VILLAGE, Calif. , Dec. 6, 2016 ... privately held, clinical-stage medical dermatology and aesthetics ... plc, a privately held specialty pharmaceutical company ... common inflammatory skin conditions, including psoriasis, atopic ... of the agreement, Sienna will make an ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016  Arcturus Therapeutics, Inc. ... company, announced today that it entered into collaboration ... therapeutics for the treatment of NASH and other ... delivery platform LUNAR™ and UNA Oligomer chemistry. The ... Takeda,s long-standing commitment to and expertise in GI ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016  Regulus Therapeutics Inc. ... leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines ... candidates at its R&D day, held in ... RGLS5040, is an anti-miR targeting microRNA-27 (miR-27) for ... RGLS4326, is an anti-miR targeting microRNA-17 (miR-17) for ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: