Navigation Links
Research could lead to new cancer assay, aid both dogs and humans
Date:6/5/2014

CORVALLIS, Ore. Veterinary researchers at Oregon State University have identified a unique group of proteins that indicate the presence of transitional cell carcinoma the most common cause of bladder cancer and may lead to a new assay which could better diagnose this disease in both dogs and humans.

Bladder cancer is particularly common in some dog breeds, such as collies, sheepdogs and terriers, but is rarely diagnosed in animals before it has spread significantly. Some assays exist to detect it in humans, but they often have a high-number of false-positive identifications.

An improved assay to detect this serious disease much earlier in both animals and humans should be possible, scientists said, and may even become affordable enough that it could be used as an over-the-counter product to test urine, much like a human pregnancy test. Some of the work may also contribute to new therapies, they said.

"Research of this type should first help us develop a reliable assay for this cancer in dogs, and improve the chance the disease can be caught early enough that treatments are effective," said Shay Bracha, an assistant professor in the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine.

"However, this type of cancer is essentially the same in dogs and humans," Bracha said. "Dogs are an excellent model for human cancer research, and an assay that works with dogs should be directly relevant to creation of a similar assay for humans. We hope to make it inexpensive and convenient, something that people could use routinely to protect either the health of their pets or themselves."

The findings were published recently in Analytical Chemistry, a professional journal.

In this research, scientists used mass spectrometry and the evolving science of proteomics to identify 96 proteins that appear related to transitional cell carcinoma. This is a fairly common cancer in dogs, often as a result of exposure to pesticides, herbicides, and poor quality foods; and in humans is closely related to smoking.

Advanced-stage disease in both dogs and humans has a poor prognosis, as chemotherapy and radiation treatments are often ineffective. Average survival time is less than one year. Some assays exist to help identify the disease in humans but can produce false positive results, often as a result of urinary tract infections. And the biopsies used to make a definitive diagnosis require general anesthesia and also run the risk of actually spreading the disease.

The group of proteins identified in this research already have a 90 percent accuracy, and researchers say they hope to improve upon that with continued research.

However, researchers say that some of these proteins are more than just biomarkers of the disease they are part of the disease process. Identifying proteins that are integral to the spread of the cancer may allow new targets for intervention and cancer therapies, they said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Shay Bracha
shay.bracha@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4844
Oregon State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Research helps clarify how obesity leads to type 2 diabetes, cancer
2. NIDA review summarizes research on marijuanas negative health effects
3. UO researchers use rhythmic brain activity to track memories in progress
4. FAPESP announces the SPRINT -- Sao Paulo Researchers in International Collaboration
5. A new approach to Alzheimers disease research
6. UCLA researchers identify new gene involved in Parkinsons disease
7. Researching how residential environment impacts preterm delivery in African-Americans
8. Notre Dame receives Gates grant for groundbreaking research in global heal
9. Moffitt researchers develop process to help personalize treatment for lung cancer patients
10. NIH task force proposes standards for research on chronic low back pain
11. Researchers to expand child exploitation web-crawler
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Research could lead to new cancer assay, aid both dogs and humans
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... will be giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of ... that focuses on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history of ... Brink” is the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his ... veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his career as a ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Orleans, LA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... centers in the U.S., announced today its plans to open a flagship location in ... will occupy the former Rooms To Go store next to Office Depot in the ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... Award of Excellence to Carol Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s ... 4 – 8. , In honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Dr. Parsa Mohebi, ... a medical article to the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal section, ... hair transplant procedure known as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). , Dr. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... 2, 2017  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: ... the third quarter of 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, ... that day with the investment community and media to ... conference call will begin at 9 a.m. Eastern time. ... live webcast of the conference call through a link ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Early Signal Foundation ... and home sensors for real-time monitoring of patients with ... nonprofit organization focused on disruptive health solutions for rare ... system to record and integrate behavioral, cognitive, physiological and ... ...
(Date:9/23/2017)... Janssen Biotech, Inc. (Janssen) announced today that ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the Biologics ... treatment of moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ... needed to further evaluate the safety of sirukumab in ... "We are disappointed ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: