Navigation Links
Research Shows Why Statins Don't Work for Everyone
Date:6/16/2008

A key protein change can lessen the cholesterol-lowering drugs' effectiveness

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic quirk in the production of one protein helps explain why some people don't get the full cholesterol-lowering benefit of statin drugs, researchers report.

Statins include blockbuster medications such as Crestor, Lipitor, Pravachol and Zocor.

The protein, abbreviated as HMGCR, plays a critical role in production of LDL cholesterol, the "bad" kind that clogs arteries, explained lead researcher Dr. Ronald Krauss, director of atherosclerosis research at the Children's Hospital Oakland Research Center in Oakland, Calif.

Some people use the HMGCR enzyme to produce LDL in an alternative way, however, and this difference is "strongly related to the LDL-lowering effect of statins," Krauss said.

At the heart of the process are protein fragments called exons that are spliced together to produce an active protein, he explained. Statins block LDL cholesterol production by binding to a particular exon when the protein is assembled. But depending on how this HMGCR splicing occurs, a statin drug has a better or worse chance of working as it should to lower cholesterol.

Krauss' team reported its findings in the June 17 issue of Circulation.

Krauss and his colleagues studied the genetic activity of HMGCR production in laboratory cell lines obtained from about 200 participants in a cholesterol study.

They found the alternatively spliced and less active version of the HMGCR protein in many of the cell lines. "Everyone has it to a greater or lesser degree," Krauss said. The incidence of the alternatively spliced protein was the same in whites and blacks, he said.

There have been previous reports of genetic variations in the protein, one of them from the group led by Krauss. Those involved point mutations, in which a specific unit of the protein chain was abnormal, he said. This is the first report of an alternatively spliced version.

"Statins are used by millions of people, so anything that affects the response to them is important," noted Dr. Michael Y. Tsai, director of the Lipid and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment Laboratory at the University of Minnesota.

"But this only accounts for 6 to 15 percent of the variation in response, so it is not enough to be clinically useful," Tsai added.

Nevertheless, he said, "this is making progress in the right direction."

Krauss agreed that there's more to the statin response than HMGCR. So, testing patients for the alternative splicing version of the protein before writing a statin prescription probably isn't in the cards for the near future, he said.

"This identifies a piece of the puzzle," Krauss noted. "There is considerable variation among individuals in how they respond to statins. If we can put all the pieces of the puzzle together, that would have clinical value. This is a big piece but not enough for clinical application."

More information

To learn about statins and who should be taking them, consult the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Ronald Krauss, M.D., director, atherosclerosis research, Children's Hospital & Research Center, Oakland, Calif; Michael Y. Tsai, M.D., Ph.D., director, Lipid and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; June 17, 2008, Circulation


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
5. New research shows how chronic stress worsens neurodegenerative disease course
6. New research explores newborn in-hospital weight loss
7. Research may unlock mystery of autisms origin in the brain
8. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
9. HIVs impact in Zimbabwe explored in new research
10. U.S. Research Funding Continues to Flatten as U.S. Health Costs Climb - in August 31 Science
11. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Research Shows Why Statins Don't Work for Everyone
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... June 28, 2017 , ... Hayes, Inc., a leading ... the guest speaker lineup* for its second annual Client Symposium. Joining the symposium ... Dr. Keith Fernandez of Privia Health; and Lisa Tourville of Anthem. , ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... ... American Farmer proudly announces the participation of Pure Line Seeds, Inc (Pure Line ... fourth quarter 2017. American Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. , Founded in ... demand grew, the small company located in Moscow, Idaho extended its sales from Northern ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... June 28, 2017 , ... Designers Insurance ... communities in northern Virginia and DC, is announcing a cooperative charity event in ... Alzheimer’s and other disorders that lead to memory impairment. , The Insight Memory ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... ... Harbour , a DAO (decentralized autonomous organization) that harnesses the wisdom of ... technical specifications . , 2017 has seen an explosion of token launches by blockchain ... will garner the greatest ROI. Dean Eigenmann, Co-founder and CEO of Harbour, said, “We ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... A January ... been projected to reach a staggering $6.81 billion by the year 2024 according to ... at a faster rate than those made from titanium. Los Angeles area clinic Beverly ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/12/2017)... Kineta, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the development of ... R&D and Head of Virology Kristin Bedard has been invited ... and Beyond meeting sponsored by Life Science Washington.  This ... AM PDT at the Agora Conference Center in ... be joined by other leaders in infectious disease research and ...
(Date:6/9/2017)... , June 9, 2017 More than ... further effort to help spread lessons learned from clinical ... International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Eli Lilly and Company ... the second phase of the Bringing Research in Diabetes ... their commitment to helping people with diabetes effectively manage ...
(Date:6/7/2017)... , June 7, 2017 Endo International ... June 7, 2017, the Hon. Joseph R. Goodwin ... of West Virginia , entered a ... Inc. Pelvic Repair System Products Liability Litigation (the "MDL") ... MDL cases to provide expert disclosures on specific causation ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: