Navigation Links
Regular Brisk Walks May Protect Prostate Cancer Patients
Date:5/24/2011

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer patients who take brisk walks on a regular basis fare better than those who don't, a new study suggests.

They not only lower their risk for disease progression, they lower their chances of dying from the disease, the researchers reported.

The finding builds on earlier research from the same group of scientists that had indicated that "vigorous physical activity" reduces the risk of dying from prostate cancer.

"Men who engaged in brisk walking, defined as three miles per hour or faster, after a diagnosis of clinically localized prostate cancer, had a reduced risk of prostate cancer progression compared to men who walked at an easy pace [less than two miles per hour]," said study author Erin L. Richman, a research associate in the department of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco.

"Men who engaged in three hours per week or more of brisk walking had the greatest benefit," Richman added, "with a 57 percent lower risk of disease progression compared to men who walked less than three hours per week at an easy pace. These results were independent of clinical prognostic factors, dietary factors and lifestyle factors such as obesity and smoking."

Richman's report appears in the June 1 issue of Cancer Research.

The study authors pointed out that about 2.2 million men now struggle with a prostate cancer diagnosis in the United States, and the disease is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among American men. In 2010, approximately 217,000 new cases were diagnosed.

To explore how lifestyle might impact disease progression following a diagnosis, the study team focused on 1,455 prostate cancer patients who were enrolled at one of 40 urology clinics in 2004 and 2005.

At the time the study launched, all the men had localized cancer, meaning that their disease had not yet spread beyond the prostate.

All the men completed a survey to assess their physical activity routines. Richman noted that most of the men had initially undergone "curative therapy," including radical prostactectomy and/or radiation treatment.

The researchers observed that walking accounted for about half of all the physical activity exerted by the patients, and that those who were observed to walk in a so-called "brisk" manner tended to be younger and more fit than those who walked more slowly. Brisk walkers were also less likely to smoke.

By stacking up exercise regimens against telltale signs of disease progression (such as PSA levels, the spread of the disease, and/or death), the research team found that patients who walked briskly for a minimum of three hours per week had a significantly lower rate of disease progression (57 percent lower) than those who walked at an easy pace for less than three hours per week.

In fact, the pace of walking seemed to be more important than the amount of time spent walking. Walking at an easy pace conferred no particular protective benefit against prostate cancer progression.

Richman's team cautioned that more research is needed to confirm the findings. She also suggested that other types of exercise might also prove helpful.

Dr. Lionel L. Banez, an assistant professor in the division of urologic surgery in the department of surgery at Duke University Medical Center, agreed that further research might find that other forms of exercise convey a similar protection.

"It is very reasonable to extrapolate these findings to include other forms of physical activity," he noted. "Our own previous study did show that moderate exercise, which included various forms of physical activity, was associated with lower risk for aggressive prostate cancer among veterans."

More information

There's more on prostate cancer at the American Cancer Society.

SOURCES: Erin L. Richman, Sc.D, research associate, department of epidemiology and biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco; Lionel L. Banez, M.D., assistant professor, division of urologic surgery, department of surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C.; June 1, 2011, Cancer Research


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Care for Irregular Heartbeat Costs U.S. Billions: Study
2. Yoga May Also Calm a Dangerous Irregular Heartbeat
3. Healthy Lifestyles Could Halve Cases of Dangerous Irregular Heartbeat
4. Irregular Heart Beat Plus Stroke May Increase Dementia Risk
5. New Guidelines OK Pradaxa Blood Thinner as Option for Irregular Heartbeat
6. New Drug May Help Patients With Irregular Heartbeat Avoid Stroke
7. Insufficient, Irregular Sleep Tied to Kids Obesity
8. Guidelines Eased for Patients With Irregular Heartbeats
9. Regular Exercise While Young May Slow Middle-Age Spread
10. Regular Walking May Slow Decline of Alzheimers
11. Regular exercise reduces large number of health risks including dementia and some cancers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Regular Brisk Walks May Protect  Prostate Cancer Patients
(Date:5/4/2016)... Lake City, Utah (PRWEB) , ... May 04, ... ... modular surface flooring brand will provide the playing surface for the 2016 ... Select™ modular surface was installed today for the men’s volleyball championship to be ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 , ... Level 10 ... announced her verbal commitment to the University of Arizona for the fall of 2019. ... her decision last month. Brovedani’s commitment to the GymCats came from her connection with ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... 04, 2016 , ... Olshan Properties , one of ... announced that its service-based charitable program, Olshan Outreach, successfully raised awareness and funds ... Properties’ annual philanthropic tradition in 2016 with the ‘Fight Against Cancer’. ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... , ... A new collaboration will give more researchers access to the largest ... analytics leader SAS will provide researchers worldwide with data management and analytics tools to ... , The DCRI and SAS share the goal of greater transparency and openness ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... 2016 , ... May kicked off with Melanoma Monday , a multi-agency ... Ellen Turner is encouraging her patients, as well as residents all around Dallas, Cleburne, ... health now and in the future. , The dermatology-specific awareness month ends with “Don’t ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... 3, 2016 ACME Markets, ... and Delaware County Councilman Dave White ... in all ACME pharmacies across ... Control and Prevention (CDC), naloxone has saved 26,463 lives nationwide over ... Delaware County were authorized to administer naloxone ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. , May 3, 2016  While you may be familiar with watching ... 4K resolution , also known as ultra-high-definition or 8MP in the Medical Industry.  Ampronix  is ... class manufacturer of innovative technology. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160502/362730 ... ... ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... 3, 2016   Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO) announced today that it is celebrating Hepatitis ... of two patients who tell their personal story and encourage those at risk to get ... Jacque: Hepatitis C ... ... Diplomat Specialty Pharmacy (PRNewsFoto/Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc.) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: