Navigation Links
Reducing cancer panic

New research has allayed some panic about suspected cancer-causing agents, such as deodorants, coffee and artificial sweeteners. A risk assessment tool has been developed through the Cancer Control Program at South Eastern Sydney & Illawarra Health (SESIH) by a University of New South Wales (UNSW) researcher, Professor Bernard Stewart.

Our tool will help establish if the level of risk is high say, on a par with smoking or unlikely such as using deodorants, artificial sweeteners and drinking coffee or fluoridated water or at risk bands in between, said Professor Stewart.

The media are filled with reports about possible causes of cancer: most commonly, a new and unexpected exposure to a previously suspected carcinogen.

Its one thing to know that arsenic is carcinogenic - but quite another to distinguish between different methods of exposure. Thats what this approach achieves, said Professor Stewart. For instance, smelter workers who are exposed to arsenic emissions are much more likely to develop cancer than children who have played on climbing frames constructed from arsenic-treated timber but the carcinogen is the same.

Until now there have only been mathematical risk assessments, which are complicated and of limited application.

Our approach can be used whenever carcinogenic risk can be implied, said Professor Stewart.

In an issue of the journal Mutation Research Reviews, the newly developed procedure has been applied to more than than sixty situations, ranging from active smoking to electromagnetic fields in the workplace which are all deemed to offer some degree of carcinogenic risk. Consequently, each situation can be located within one of five bands corresponding to proven, likely, inferred, unknown or unlikely risk of carcinogenic outcome.

Surveys suggest that tobacco smoking is correctly identified as the major cause of cancer, but a host of other situations calling on a mobile phone, air pollution, being exposed to DDT, eating dioxin-contaminated fish, using hairdyes, and drinking alcoholic beverages are often equated.

We now have a means of indicating which carcinogenic risks are comparable by reference to the type of evidence available, says Professor Stewart. This risk assessment gives the lie to the attitude that Everything causes cancer.

The Cancer Council Australias Chief Executive Officer, Professor Ian Olver, said The Cancer Council was frequently called on to provide evidence-based comment to help the media and public make sense of the many and frequent reports about risks from exposure to suspected carcinogens.

Being able to draw on an evidence base that evaluates carcinogenic risk based on different types of exposure will be an invaluable resource to help organisations like The Cancer Council, Professor Olver said. We want to ensure the public has accurate information about where carcinogens pose a genuine concern and how people can best reduce their risk.


Contact: Bernard Stewart
University of New South Wales

Related medicine news :

1. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
2. Global Health Project targets reducing AIDS among Indias adolescents
3. Preventing or reducing enlarged heart decreases risk of heart failure
4. Acting Surgeon General Announces National Initiatives to Protect Children by Reducing Exposure to Secondhand Smoke
5. Safe Blood for Africa Foundations African Club 25 Greatly Reducing HIV Infections in African Youth
6. Breast cancer survivors optimistic, yet lack critical information on reducing recurrence
7. World Bank Group Report on Malaria in Africa Highlights Progress Towards Goal of Significantly Reducing Malaria Deaths
8. Americans Pessimistic View of Accident Prevention Poses Hurdle to Reducing Injuries, Survey Says
9. Study shows reducing class size may be more cost-effective than most medical interventions
10. Role of a key enzyme in reducing heart disease identified
11. Preventing or reducing enlarged heart may decrease risk for diabetes
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... management services, today announced its partnership with WPC Healthcare , a provider ... systems and organizes the data into an aggregated data repository necessary to perform ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... 13, 2015 , ... Altec Products, Inc., the leader in ... Dynamics AXUG, GPUG and NAVUG Summits to take place the week of October ... user conferences designed and led by users to provide attendees with a unique ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Relay (, a technology company that connects ... contract that will provide its award-winning private messaging solution to Independence Blue Cross ... of its Relay program, IBX Wire™, which now has over 550,000 members using ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... ... A child without a healthy mouth is much more likely to have ... system, has joined with Global Dental Relief (GDR) to help bring dental ... purchased, SmileCareClub will donate one clinic visit to a child in Kenya. , “When ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... Watsonville, California (PRWEB) , ... ... ... has launched Postnatal Omega-3, a first-of-its kind product that targets the unique ... “Official Postnatal Omega-3” of the American Pregnancy Association ( ), utilizes ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)...  Synapse Biomedical Inc. ( ) reported today ... the use of the NeuRx ® Diaphragm Pacing ... the United States and ... The PAS study group met their initial enrollment goal ... since expanded the enrollment target to 150 participants.   ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... , Oct. 13 2015 ... the "US & European markets for Meniscal ... their offering. --> ) has ... European markets for Meniscal Repair - 16 Countries ... Research and Markets ( ) has ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... Research and Markets ( ) has ... Types (Bacteria, Yeast, Mold, Others), Flavors (Herbs & Spices, ... by Region - Forecasts to 2020" report to ... --> The global market for kombucha ... terms of value, the market is projected to reach ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: