Navigation Links
Reduced intensity regimen prior to marrow transplant better for older leukemia patients
Date:12/9/2012

COLUMBUS, Ohio A new study led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC James) shows that preparing older acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients for bone marrow transplants with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen appears to be associated with higher rates of disease-free survival relative to the more typical treatments usually given to such patients. The study was presented at the 2012 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA.

Typically, the prognosis for older AML patients is poor. Even in patients who achieve complete remission through chemotherapy, survival rates remain low due to high risk of relapse. While blood or bone marrow transplants can be a viable option for younger patients, conventional preparative regimens leading up to the procedure are often too toxic for patients over the age of 60.

"With a reduced intensity regimen leading up to a transplant, the disease free survival rate in older patients reached 39 percent," said Steven M. Devine, MD, Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Hematology at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, and director of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Program. "These outcomes are better than those achieved using more conventional treatments and warrant additional comparison research and studies focused on preventing relapse in this patient population."

Methodology & Results

The objective of the Phase II, prospective, multi-center trial was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a uniform reduced intensity conditioning regimen prior to a blood cell transplant in older AML patients in clinical remission. The primary endpoint of the study was two-year disease-free survival. Researchers hypothesized that disease-free survival at two years would exceed 20 percent. One hundred twenty three AML patients in first clinical remission following chemotherapy, ages 60-74, were transplanted at 21 centers across the country. Forty seven percent of patients had match related donors and 53 percent had unrelated donors. All but eight patients (who received fludarabine and busulfan alone) were conditioned with the same regimen containing fludarabine (30mg/m2/day x 5), busulfan (6.4mg/kg IV total dose) and antithymocyte globulin (7.5mg/kg total dose). One case of primary graft failure was reported. Rates of both acute and chronic graft vs host disease and treatment related mortality were relatively low. There were no unexpected toxicities associated with these transplants.. Relapse was the most common cause of death.


'/>"/>

Contact: Liz Bryan, Spectrum
lbryan@spectrumscience.com
443-506-1931
Ohio State University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Huntingtons Disease Linked to Reduced Cancer Risk in Study
2. Decision guide reduced uncertainty over breast cancer prevention, study finds
3. Physical activity linked to reduced mortality in breast and colon cancer patients
4. High-contrast, high-resolution CT scans now possible at reduced dose
5. Long-term testosterone treatment for men results in reduced weight and waist size
6. HCOs find risks & opportunities in quest for reduced costs & improved quality
7. Health care organizations quest for reduced costs and improved quality
8. PharmaNet system dramatically reduced inappropriate prescriptions of potentially addictive drugs
9. Study shows anaesthetic-related deaths reduced dramatically
10. Health inequalities could be reduced by more effective healthcare, says new study
11. Health inequalities could be reduced by more effective health care, says new study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Ongoing news of the ravages of traumatic ... to conduct a survey that takes a closer look at cases of TBI being ... and causes of TBI among the aging population, and identifies the challenges associated with ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Armune BioScience signed ... their network of laboratory service centers across the country. Launched in April of 2015, ... the detection of prostate cancer. Apifiny order volume exceeded 3,000 tests in 2015. Primary ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... The Club at ... the prestigious Distinguished Emerald Club of the World award, as determined by the ... of the most respected trade publications serving private clubs. , “We’d like to ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 10, 2016 , ... Workrite Ergonomics, who is celebrating their 25th year of ... to being an internationally recognized leader in their industry. , "We are very proud ... President of Workrite. “Workrite recognized the importance of good ergonomics before most of ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... Ross A. ... are delighted to welcome a new addition to their growing practice. Beginning this ... as a nurse practitioner performing cosmetic procedures including injectables, fillers and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)...  Visage Imaging Inc. ("Visage"), a wholly owned ... that the American College of Radiology (ACR) and ... Visage 7 Enterprise Imaging Platform as the new ... SIMulation (SIM). SIM is the assessment component of ... multi-faceted and fully-integrated online assessment, education and remediation ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... -- CERS ), Medivation, Inc. (NASDAQ: MDVN ... Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLDX ). --> CERS ... (NASDAQ: ADMS ) and Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... become vitally important in the development of targeted treatment therapies ... which are defined as those intended for the safe and ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Israel , February 10, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... leader in the field of cartilage repair, announces the ... 5, 2016. The $15 million investment was led by ... pharmaceutical manufacturer, and was joined by existing Regentis investors ... and both the Technion Research & Development Foundation and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: