Navigation Links
Re-admission rates via emergency rooms climbing among patients who have recently been hospitalized

(BOSTON) Emergency department patients who have recently been hospitalized are more than twice as likely to be admitted as those who have not recently been in the hospital, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania which will be presented this week at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine's annual meeting.

"Patients who return to the emergency department within seven days of hospitalization have both relatively high and increasing rates of readmission," says Zachary F. Meisel, MD, MPH, MSc, an emergency physician and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, who led the study. "These findings are important because they come at a time when there is a great effort underway to reduce hospital re-admission rates, and they give us clues about how emergency departments can play a role in that process."

Looking at data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Meisel and his colleagues analyzed a sample of about 2.3 million emergency room visits from each year between 2005 and 2008 and found that hospital re-admission rates for recently hospitalized patients increased for each year of the study -- from 28.6 percent to 38 percent. Admission rates for patients not recently hospitalized increased at a lesser rate -- from 15.3 percent to 17.2 percent. These findings do not appear to be driven by differences in age or the system of triaging sick or injured patients who seek help in the emergency room.

The findings suggest rich possibilities for future research, Meisel says. "First, these results tell us that most patients who come to an emergency department after a hospitalization are not being readmitted. This means that the emergency department plays a major role in preventing readmissions by taking care of these patients and sending them home," he says. "However, because admission decisions are often made in the emergency department, we need to better understand why recently discharged patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital than people who have not recently been in the hospital. For example, are they being treated extra cautiously? Is there a sense on the part of emergency physicians that their inpatient physicians know these patients better and can take better care of them in the hospital?"

The data also has policy implications, the researchers suggest, for better defining the role of emergency departments in determining the disposition of recently hospitalized patients. Hospitals might, for instance, identify ways to intervene at the time of discharge to reduce emergency department use in the coming days and weeks, or improve the capacity of their emergency departments to safely discharge the patients back to their homes.


Contact: Holly Auer
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. Reducing revolving door hospital re-admissions
2. Media Alert: Abvio Demonstrates Innovative iPhone 3G/3GS Fitness Applications for Running, Cycling and Walking at Macworld 2010
3. Dementia Rates Escalate as Brain Capacity Diminishes with Age
4. Blue Cross Claim That 39% Premium Hikes Due Only to Escalating Cost of Health Care Trigger Calls for Regulation of Rates
5. Protecting patients: Study shows that Johns Hopkins flu vaccination rates twice national average
6. Allegheny General Hospital Study Demonstrates Safety and Potential Efficacy of Oral Allergy Treatment
7. Breast Cancer Stats Differ Racially Despite Similar Mammogram Rates
8. High Rates of Childhood Leukemia Seen in Iraq Province
9. International study confirms doubling of childhood leukemia rates in southern Iraq
10. Dips in Breast Cancer Rates Seen Most in Affluent Women
11. The Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Museum of Vision Celebrates 30 Years of Preserving Ophthalmic Heritage
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... MPWH, the No.1 Herpes-only dating community in the ... Table 1-1 ). More than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 ... (HSV-1), according to WHO's first global estimates of HSV-1 infection . , "The data ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... A simply groundbreaking television series, "Voices ... show that delves into an array of issues that are presently affecting Americans. Dedicated ... open dialogue, this show is changing the subjects consumers focus on, one episode at ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) awarded accreditation to its ... exclusive list of CAAHEP accredited colleges, as only one of twelve colleges and universities ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Avid collector, Andrew Hawley from Vintage ... style concert posters. This is one of Joplin's most famous and beautiful concert posters. ... University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The According to Hawley, "It is hard to ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... Inevitably when ... Many customers choose to buy during the Black Friday and Cyber Monday ... don’t need to search the Internet high and low to find the best massage ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the  "2016 ... the Global Cell Surface Testing Market: ... report to their offering.  --> ... addition of the  "2016 Future Horizons ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... --> adds "Global ... and "Investigation Report on China Repaglinide ... 2021 forecasts data and information to ... . --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... DUBLIN , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the "Global ... to their offering. --> ... "Global Brain Monitoring Devices Market 2015-2019" ... Research and Markets ( ) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: