Navigation Links
Rapid Response Teams Don't Cut Hospital Heart Attacks, Death Rates
Date:12/2/2008

Money may be better spent in other areas, experts say

TUESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital rapid response teams, created to prevent cardiac arrest and deaths in critically ill patients, do not seem to work, a new study finds.

"Many hospitals have implemented these teams over the past decade," said lead researcher Dr. Paul S. Chan, a cardiologist at the Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Mo. "Earlier studies had shown that rapid response teams may decrease code [cardiac arrest] rates for patients in the hospital."

Rapid response teams are usually made up of doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists, whose primary role is to care for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). The teams are also called to help evaluate patients who are not in the ICU.

"The goal of these teams was to get called, usually by nurses, to patients who are declining and do a rapid assessment and treatment to try to prevent cardiac arrest and deaths," Chan said.

For the study, Chan's team looked at the association between interventions by rapid response teams and changes in cardiac arrests and deaths in a Kansas City hospital. The researchers compared 24,193 patients hospitalized before the start of team intervention with 24,978 patients hospitalized after a rapid response team was put in place.

Over 20 months later, the team had responded 376 times. The usual reasons the team was called was for changes in a patient's mental state, rapid heartbeat called tachycardia, which can lead to cardiac arrest, rapid breathing or abnormally low blood pressure.

Since many patients evaluated by the rapid response team are transferred to the ICU, Chan's group looked at cardiac arrest and deaths both in and out of the ICU.

Before the rapid response team was in place, there were 11.2 cardiac arrests per 1,000 patients. After the team was started, the cardiac arrest rate was 7.5 per 1,000 patients. While there was a reduction in cardiac arrests after the team was in place, the reduction was not statistically significant, Chan said.

Also, the number of deaths after a cardiac arrest did not change after the rapid response team was in place. Before the team, 77.9 percent of patients who arrested died, compared with 76.1 percent after the team began its work, Chan's group found.

In addition, overall hospital deaths did not change after the team was in place. Before the rapid response team, in-hospital deaths were 3.22 per 100 patients, and after intervention the death rate was 3.09 per 100 patients.

"Our findings raise questions whether or not hospitals should be investing huge financial and personnel resources in these teams without a demonstrable benefit," Chan said.

The report is published in the Dec. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

There may be other programs that might reduce cardiac arrests and death in the hospital, Chan noted. "But it's not clear that we can even move the mortality," he said. "Moving mortality on the hospital level is a monumental task."

One expert thinks hospitals should use their resources in areas of proven value.

"The evidence supporting any benefits of rapid response teams has been tenuous at best," said Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, director of the Ahmanson-UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Yet, based on recommendations to implement rapid response teams by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, hospitals across the country have diverted substantial resources and personnel to create and staff such teams."

This latest study failed to show reductions in hospital-wide code rates or mortality with a rapid response team, Fonarow added. "Hospitals should focus on performance improvement and patient safety initiatives, which are evidence-based," he said.

More information

For more information on cardiac arrest, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Paul S. Chan, M.D., M.Sc., cardiologist, Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Mo.; Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiology, and director, Ahmanson-UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center, University of California, Los Angeles; Dec. 3, 2008, Journal of the American Medical Association


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Ultrasound waves aid in rapid treatment of DVT
2. Frutarom Continues to Implement its Rapid Growth Strategy
3. New Research Shows MicroPhage Test Accurately and Rapidly Detects Serious Bacterial Infections
4. Lees Pharmaceutical Kept Up the Rapid Pace of Growth; Profit Attributable to Shareholders Surged 176% in the Nine Months of 2008
5. Central California Doctors Now Using Fast RapidArc(TM) Radiotherapy Technology to Battle Cancer
6. Cancer Patients in Southeastern Florida Now Benefiting From RapidArc(TM) Radiotherapy Treatments
7. Response Biomedical Announces Launch of RAMP(R) Technology in 3M(TM) Rapid Detection Flu A+B Test at ICAAC/IDSA Conference
8. Sugammadex Study First to Show Rapid Reversal of Profound Rocuronium-Induced Muscle Relaxation is Possible
9. Clinicians in Netherlands Treat Lung Cancer Patients Using New RapidArc Radiotherapy Technology from Varian Medical Systems
10. Inverness Medical Innovations Announces 4th Generation Rapid HIV Test - Determine(TM) HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo
11. Selexis Now Offering Rapid-Development of Human Cell Line With FDA Approval Pedigree
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Rapid Response Teams Don't Cut Hospital Heart Attacks, Death Rates
(Date:5/28/2016)... ... ... a year and a half of planning the Multiple Pathways of Recovery Conference , ... Recovery Conference was held May 2 -4, 2016 at the Mystic Marriott Hotel & ... explore the many pathways individuals use to get into and sustain their recovery. Pathways ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... Two ... named as YWCA Tribute to Women and Industry (TWIN) 2016 honorees. The award ... their workplace. For this year, Geri Boone, Director of the MLTSS (Managed Long-Term Services ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... This campaign aims to ... which we as a society can control and change. , As nearly 795,000 Americans ... 40 seconds within the United States. Plus, with an estimated 129,000 of these people ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed at nurses and employees ... stories, courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health care industry. It also ... advocates and associations—namely Jones & Bartlett Learning. , Jones & Bartlett Learning is ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... Despite last week’s media reports hinting at a June rate hike after the ... for an interest rate increase, according to Rajeev Dhawan of the Economic Forecasting Center ... Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are of interest to the press for their noise ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... -- Diana Russell suffers from a form of rheumatoid arthritis ... This disease has put her in a wheelchair, and ... to leave her home.  Because of the size and ... wheelchair.  So if there is a family function, the ... to wait for the bus. Photo - ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Celsion Corporation (NASDAQ: ... today provided an update on its ongoing OVATION ... combining GEN-1, the Company,s DNA-based immunotherapy, with the ... patients with advanced ovarian cancer who will undergo ... is an IL-12 DNA plasmid vector formulated as ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... KONG , May 24, 2016 ... stent de doble terapia del mundo, introduce catéteres ... arteriovenosa. OrbusNeich, una compañía global especializada ... las vidas, ha expandido su cartera incluyendo productos ... balón JADE™ y Scoreflex™ PTA son los dispositivos ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: