Navigation Links
Rapid, broad countermeasures sought against mystery infections
Date:4/8/2014

A group of University of Washington scientists is seeking broad, versatile countermeasures effective against several different kinds of viruses and other pathogens. The investigators are part of a national push for faster responses to unexpected infectious agents. These include newly emerging, unknown pathogens, forgotten ones, those expanding beyond their usual geographic range, or dangerous new strains of old enemies like influenza.

"Emerging viruses are a major threat to global public health, especially because few antivirals are available to treat patients," noted Michael Katze, UW professor of microbiology who is heading the UW contributions to this effort. "There is a significant need for methods to rapidly identify newly emergent pathogens, but also to guide medical treatments and to quickly contain outbreaks."

The UW is one of seven institutions across the country recently chosen as part of the Center for Research in Diagnostic and Discovery program, under the auspices of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Centers of Excellence for Translational Research. The Center brings together experts from across the country in microbial ecology, human and microbe genetics, engineering, public health and many other fields.

In concert, the Center investigators will devise new ways to prevent, detect, track, diagnose and treat emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases and counter bioterrorism. W. Ian Lipkin of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University is leading the $31 million effort. Over the next five years, the University of Washington is expected to receive approximately $5 million of this grant from NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The project extends the Katze lab's inventive, basic research to potential clinical applications against new viral pathogens, such as those behind Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, also known as SARS, avian influenza, and others, according to Angela Rasmussen, a UW research scientist and project manager for the new UW research center.

She added that the new Center will allow the Katze lab to leverage its extensive experience with genomics and systems biology to develop new diagnostic tools and prognostic assays.

The lab, she noted, also wants to identify drugs that can be repurposed for timely responses to epidemics and biodefense threats.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases reports that it has shifted its strategy away from "one-bug-one-drug" toward building a more flexible, broad-spectrum arsenal against multiple pathogens.

Newly emerging pathogens vary in the degree of illness they cause. Some people can be infected with an unheard-of virus and have no symptoms. Other times, viruses that have never struck a human population before can have lethal manifestations, such as blood loss, brain swelling, or extreme difficulty breathing.

The Katze lab will analyze how infected organisms, their genes, cells and immune systems, and their viral attackers interact with each other. They will use machine-learning computer modeling, profiles of gene transcriptions and other measures of genome-wide activity, as well as non-linear geometric and other mathematical methods, to discover ways to measure infectious disease severity. These measurements point out distinctive signatures in the hosts' reaction to infection.

The signatures might assist in diagnosing illness, predicting disease outcome, and finding new ways of modulating the host response to ward off or tame pathogens.

The researchers will also mine drug databases to uncover existing therapies to repurpose. Their host signature method complements traditional emerging infectious disease or bioterrorism research, which often depends on locating, cultivating and identifying the virus or other causative agent.

In their proposal, the researchers indicated that they hope the combination of approaches will reduce "the difficulties in responding to contain and treat previously unknown or uncharacterized pathogens."

Research for this project will also take place in the high-containment laboratory at National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases' Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Montana. Funding for this project is from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U19 AI109761).


'/>"/>

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Pill-sized device provides rapid, detailed imaging of esophageal lining
2. Commonly used intra-aortic balloon pump may have broader potential for heart patients
3. My Positive Perspective Broadcasts Episode Recorded in Honor of the Charleston Nine
4. House of Brides Uses Broad Marketing Plan to Attract Customers to Bridal Sale
5. My Positive Perspective Broadcasts Their Last Episode of 2013 and Looks Forward to 2014.
6. My Positive Perspective Broadcasts Episode to Announce the Creation of a Relief Song For the Philippines
7. Talent Conference Brings God to Hollywood, Broadway and Beyond
8. My Positive Perspective Broadcasts Episode Speaking About Another Radio Show on Kinetic Hifi
9. Forbes Living to Broadcast a Beneficial Senior Fitness Segment
10. My Positive Perspective Broadcasts Episode to Highlight the My Positive Perspective Radio Show on Kinetic Hifi
11. Operation Walk Utah Performs 60 Joint Replacement Surgeries Abroad at No Cost to Patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Rapid, broad countermeasures sought against mystery infections
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... Dr. Ronald E. Hawkins, vice president for academic affairs ... Bell, DO, MBA, HPF, FACOEP-dist., FACEP, as the new dean of Liberty ... to Liberty from the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OU-HCOM), where ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... The narrative in “ Signal 8: ... ’s true account of his paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he saw, as ... attempts to overcome them. , Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path he wanted ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... Indiana Fiber Network (IFN) President and CEO Kelly C. Dyer recently ... as the Chairman of the Management Committee when IFN was originally formed in 2002 ... of investor/owners and development of the business plan. He became the first paid ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... Thinksport, the most ... Jensie Gran Fondo of Marin. For the second year in a row, cyclists ... sunscreen. , “We are thrilled to provide our safe, non-toxic sunscreen to over ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) is pleased ... KLS is a longtime supporter of the event. , "We are pleased that KLS ... Dr. Bob Havlik, 2017 ACPA President. "KLS Martin has a long track record of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... Feb. 24, 2017 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. ... healthcare, will present at the Cowen and Company 37 ... Marriott Copley Place on Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at ... webcast of the presentation can be accessed at ... following the conference via Zimmer Biomet,s Investor Relations website ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 24, 2017  In conjunction with ... 2016 financial results press release, you are invited to ... live over the internet on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 ... A live audio webcast of the presentation ... www.durect.com and clicking "Investor Relations."  If you are ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 24. Februar 2017 ITL Limited, ( ... Gesundheitsbereiches, ist erfreut, für das zum 31. Dezember ... Vorjahreszeitraum exzellente Ergebnisse vorlegen zu können. Eine vollständige ... Wachstum" finden Sie hier . ... Steuern 2,12 Millionen USD (Dez. 2015: 1,04 Millionen USD; +104 %) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: