Navigation Links
Rainier Spots Show Higher Autism Rates
Date:11/3/2008

Researchers note that environmental toxins might trigger genetic vulnerability

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children who live in areas of the United States that get a lot of precipitation appear to have a higher risk of developing autism, a new study suggests.

Because these children may spend more time indoors or because rain brings chemicals in the atmosphere to the ground, they might be exposed to environmental triggers that can trigger a genetic predisposition to autism, the researchers say.

"There seems to be a strong association between precipitation and autism diagnosis rates," said lead researcher Michael Waldman, a professor of economics at the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University.

Waldman, whose son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, isn't saying that rain causes the condition. "Our finding strongly suggests that there is some factor which is positively correlated with precipitation, which is serving as a trigger for autism," he said.

One possible explanation for this correlation is vitamin D deficiency, Waldman said. "There is a fair amount of research that vitamin D deficiency in young children causes problems. As children aren't outside as much, they aren't getting enough vitamin D, and that's serving as a trigger for autism," he said.

Another possibility is children are spending too much time watching TV or videos, Waldman said. "There are various papers showing associations between early childhood television viewing and various problems concerning cognitive outcomes, sleep problems, behavior problems, etc.," he noted.

A third possibility is exposure to chemicals in the home which trigger autism, Waldman said. In addition, there may be a chemical or chemicals in the upper atmosphere that are transported to the surface by precipitation.

There is debate about whether autism is caused by genetics alone or genetics and the environment, Waldman said. "Our results are inconsistent with it being just genetic."

The report was published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

For the study, Waldman's team looked at the prevalence of autism among children in California, Oregon and Washington. They also used data from the National Climatic Data Center to calculate the average annual rainfall by county in these states.

The researchers found among school-aged children in these states that the prevalence of autism rose as the amount of precipitation increased. In fact, the prevalence in autism increased up to 30 percent in the rainiest counties.

Over the past three decades, the number of children diagnosed with any form of autism has increased from one in 2,500 children to one in 150 children. Some of the increase is most likely due to better diagnosis and the changing definition of autism, which now encompasses a variety of conditions called autism spectrum disorder.

Waldman's group, however, insists that a real increase in the numbers of autistic children cannot be ruled out.

Richard Lathe, an autism expert from Pieta Research in Edinburgh, Scotland, thinks that Waldman might be on to something.

"Nevertheless, one must be vigilant, because statistical correlations do not necessarily imply causality," Lathe said. "This caveat aside, the authors demonstrate, with better than 99 percent certainty, that the correlation is not by chance."

Lathe thinks the most likely explanation for the association between autism and rain is that rain carries chemicals in the atmosphere to the ground.

"This explanation is plausible," Lathe said. "Emissions from manufacturing industries, power plants, and from domestic waste incineration generally rise to the troposphere to be diluted into the large volume of the atmosphere. Precipitation can dump this load back on the land, to be absorbed by plants and animals in the food chain," he said.

One possibility that needs to be addressed further is that exposure need not be in the child, Lathe said. "There has been a suggestion that maternal exposure to environmental toxins might contribute to autism in children," he said.

These results are not definitive evidence in favor of the hypothesis that autism has an environmental trigger, but the results are consistent with the hypothesis, Lathe said. "For the future, one feels it will be essential to study levels of toxins in soil, crop and food samples from the different counties investigated in the Waldman study. A positive correlation would greatly reinforce the environmental hypothesis," he said.

Dr. Noel S. Weiss, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington in Seattle, and author of an accompanying journal editorial, thinks the results of the study need to be taken with a grain of salt.

"This is a course analysis," Weiss said. "There are difficulties, because autism is not that unequivocally defined, and the criteria for diagnosis can vary from place to place and over time. The message is really to other scientists who might examine this relationship."

Weiss isn't convinced that the association between autism and precipitation is real. "It could be, but I don't think so," he said. "But it's probably worth looking into."

More information

For more about autism, visit the U.S. National Institutes of Health.



SOURCES: Michael Waldman, Ph.D., professor, economics, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; Noel S. Weiss, M.D., Dr.P.H., professor, epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle; Richard Lathe, Ph.D., Pieta Research, Edinburgh, U.K., and author, Autism, Brain and Environment; November 2008, Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Test Spots Genetic Damage Done by Smoking
2. Gene-Based Screen Spots Cervical Cancer Earlier
3. Video Pill Spots Hidden Crohns Disease
4. Test Spots Who Should Get Implanted Defibrillator
5. New Test Criteria Spots Rheumatoid Arthritis Sooner
6. Topical treatment for age spots, from Harvard Womens Health Watch
7. Breast MRI spots other cancers, may alter treatment plan
8. Microchip Spots Stray Tumor Cells in the Bloodstream
9. Study Spots Gene That Plays Role in Infertility
10. Skin Test Spots Heart Risks in Healthy People
11. Biomarker Spots Which Lesions Likely to Progress to Prostate Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Rainier Spots Show Higher Autism Rates
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of Somerset Hills is ... vendors and unique items from across the nation, this holiday-themed event will raise funds ... by the VNA. The boutique will be open Saturday, November 4 (10:00 a.m. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... will be giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of ... that focuses on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and learning ... Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ), one of the Nation’s ... design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder pad provides optimal support and full ... while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and water that is circulated from an ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ANGELES (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration, has recently contributed a medical article to the newly ... on cosmetictown.com. Dr. Mohebi’s article spotlights the hair transplant procedure known as ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... Texas , Oct. 11, 2017  Caris Life ... focused on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today ... has joined Caris, Precision Oncology Alliance™ (POA) as its ... cancer centers, the St. Jude Crosson Cancer Institute will ... advance the use of tumor profiling, making cancer treatment ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... EXTON, Pa. , Oct. 10, 2017   ... leader in innovative solutions for injectable drug administration, today ... of West,s ID Adapter for improving the intradermal administration ... the Fourth Skin Vaccination Summit in May 2017 by ... Team Lead, Polio Department, World Health Organization (WHO), and ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... 4, 2017  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... . PhysicianOne Urgent Care is helping communities across Massachusetts ... , by offering no-cost* flu shots through the end of the month. ... health insurance regulations. ... to get a flu shot is by the end of October, according ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: