Navigation Links
Radiotherapy can cause lasting vascular disease
Date:3/22/2010

For an as yet unknown reason, cancer radiotherapy can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, a problem that is growing as more and more people survive their cancer diagnosis. New research from Karolinska Institutet now suggests that sustained inflammation induced by post-radiotherapy changes in the gene expression in the arteries could be the cause.

Epidemiological studies have shown that a course of radiotherapy increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in the same part of the body; for example, myocardial infarction after left-side breast cancer treatment, or stroke after the treatment of head and neck or brain tumours. Scientists know very little, however, about the biological causes of these serious side-effects, which often do not appear until many years following treatment.

"Studies have been hampered by the fact that the disease process is so slow," says Martin Halle, researcher at Karolinska Institutet. "Cell studies and animal studies are best suited to the more immediate effects, and studies on human subjects have been ruled out for ethical reasons."

By studying autografts that have been carried out after cancer, Martin Halle and colleagues have now for the first time managed to study the long-term effects of radiotherapy on human blood vessels. This type of autograft involves the transplantation of skin, muscle or bone tissue from one part of a patient's body to reconstruct defects that arise after the removal of a tumour in another, often irradiated, part. By harvesting biopsies from previously irradiated branches of the carotid arteries and non-irradiated arteries from grafts, the researchers have been able to compare the difference in global gene expression between irradiated and non-irradiated arteries from the same patient at the same time.

They found that the irradiated arteries showed signs of chronic inflammation and an increase in activity of Nuclear Factor- kappaB (NF-kappaB), a transcription factor known for playing a key part in the development of atherosclerosis. The greater inflammatory gene expression was visible for several years after irradiation, and might, the researchers believe, explain why cancer patients can suffer cardiovascular disease many years after radiotherapy.

"Hopefully, these findings will one day help medicine to mitigate the side effects by administering radiotherapy in combination with an anti-inflammatory treatment," says Dr Halle.

The importance of the results is underscored by the publication of an explanatory commentary in the journal's editorial.


'/>"/>

Contact: Katarina Sternudd
katarina.sternudd@ki.se
46-852-483-895
Karolinska Institutet
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Patients with resectable esophageal adenocarcinoma benefit from neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy
2. Split-course palliative radiotherapy confirmed as effective treatment for advanced NSCLC
3. Roseville Radiation Oncology Center (ROC) Redefines Efficiency With Elekta VMAT Radiotherapy Treatments
4. Casual Sex Doesnt Cause Emotional Damage: Study
5. Doctors miss major cause of infertility and obesity
6. Herbal Remedies Can Cause Cardiac Problems
7. No Surprise to David Perecman And Other Personal Injury Attorneys, Vehicles Lead All Causes of Injury at New York Hospital
8. Mental illnesses are second leading cause of time off work in Spain
9. Tobacco Toxin Helps a Protein Cause Lung Cancer
10. How sunlight causes skin cells to turn cancerous
11. Evolving Strains of HIV May Cause Wave of Drug Resistance
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United States and the loss of ... William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, have six children, ten grandchildren, ... Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator and carrier pilot, he spent ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... CitiDent and San Francisco dentists, ... cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 million Americans are estimated to ... breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to about 75 percent of people ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The company has developed a suite of ... authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has been developed by ... , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy Free, Non-Dairy*, Preservative ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... MD (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... The ... of Excellence to Carol Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual ... – 8. , In honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Information about the technology: ... develop to enable prevention of a major side effect of chemotherapy in children. ... pediatric patients. For cisplatin, hearing loss is FDA listed on-label as a dose ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... , Sept. 19, 2017   ZirMed Inc ., a ... today announced that it has been ranked #1 by its ... Book™ Rankings 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was recognized as ... large hospitals and medical centers over 200 beds and holds ... healthcare technology user survey history. ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... , Sept. 18, 2017 ... fields of bioinformatics and immune engineering, today ... protective avian influenza A (H7N9) vaccine. ... related to seasonal influenza and presents a ... on prior exposure to be effective. Using ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... YORK , Sept. 12, 2017   EcoVadis , the leading ... has published the first annual edition of its Global CSR Risk and ... companies evaluated by EcoVadis, based on Scorecard Ratings that analyzed nearly 800,000 ... ... Index ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: