Navigation Links
Radiation still used despite evidence of little benefit to some older breast cancer patients
Date:3/5/2012

Even though a large clinical study demonstrated that radiation has limited benefit in treating breast cancer in some older women, there was little change in the use of radiation among older women in the Medicare program, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in the March Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"We were surprised by these results," said lead author Cary P. Gross, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine at Yale School of Medicine. "Clinical trials are considered the gold standard of medical research and in this case the trial was influential enough to lead to a change in treatment guidelines. We expected it to have more of an impact on clinical care at the bedside."

The typical course of treatment for older women with early stage breast cancer is breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy. The purpose of added radiation therapy is to reduce recurrence of the disease. However, many older women have less aggressive tumors that place them at low risk for tumor recurrence.

The Yale team studied the impact of a large research trial funded by The National Cancer Institute (NCI) on clinical practice. Published in 2004, that NCI trial found that radiation therapy had only a small benefit for some women 70 and older with early stage, low-risk breast cancer. As a result of this study, breast cancer treatment guidelines were changed to indicate that radiation therapy could be considered optional for such patients.

But in the years following implementation of the new guidelines, Gross and his colleagues found that there has been minimal impact on the clinical care of older women with breast cancer. The team looked at the use of radiation therapy among Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with early stage breast cancer before and after the large NCI clinical trial was published. About 79% of women received radiation prior to the study compared with 75% after.

Even among the oldest women (85-94 years), the trial appeared to have little effect on clinician practice: The use of radiation decreased from 37% prior to the study to 33% after.

"These findings have important implications for how the results of clinical research studies are translated into practice," said Gross, who points out that the U.S. government invested over $1 billion in comparative effectiveness research as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. "Our societal interest in funding this type of research is appropriate, and the need is great, but we must ensure that the results of such research extend beyond the journal page and are actually incorporated into clinical decision-making."


'/>"/>
Contact: Karen N. Peart
203-432-1326
Yale University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. A new radiotherapy technique significantly reduces irradiation of healthy tissue
2. Oxford University Press to publish open access title Journal of Radiation Research
3. Research finds newer radiation therapy technology improves patients quality of life
4. Radiation plus chemotherapy provides long-term positive results for head and neck cancer patients
5. Cabazitaxel with radiation and hormone therapy may improve prostate cancer survival
6. Experts offer pointers for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT
7. Breast Cancer Radiation Linked to Raised Heart Risk
8. Targeted Radiation for Breast Cancer May Be Overused: Study
9. Scientists may be able to double efficacy of radiation therapy
10. Childhood cancer survivors exposure to chemotherapy, radiation does not increase risk of birth defects in their children
11. Blue light irradiation promotes growth, increases antioxidants in lettuce seedlings
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Occupational pesticide exposure is linked to an ... according to a study released today at the 1st Pan American Parkinson’s and ... pesticides and incidence of sporadic PD through occupational exposure. This latest study, led ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... ... replacement options at his office, Antoine Dental Center. Currently, patients can get single ... restrictions may apply, but patients can learn more about these offers by contacting ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , ... February 24, 2017 , ... An in-depth computational ... the University of Pittsburgh points to eight genes that may explain why susceptibility to ... to the results of a study published today in the journal npj Schizophrenia. ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... In the Health Care IT campaign, Robert Herjavec discusses health IT ... you will be attacked, but when.” However, he and many others involved highlight a ... Improvements in auditing and monitoring have taken security in health care a very long ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... The narrative in “ Signal 8: An Australian Paramedic’s Story ” ... paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he saw, as well as his struggles with ... Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path he wanted to take, found fulfillment in ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... , Südkorea, 23. Februar 2017 LG Innotek ... Sterilisationsaufgaben vorgestellt. Die Sterilisationsleistung beträgt das 1,5-fache des 45-mW-Moduls ... Strahlung im Bereich zwischen 200 und 280 nm und eignet ... Bakterien, indem es ihre DNA zerstört. Das Produkt von ... ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... Feb. 23, 2017 ITL Limited, ( ASX: ITD ), ... for the half year ended 31 December 2016 compared with the ... presentation can be viewed here . Highlights ... $1.04m; up 104%) Earnings per share of 2.2 ... of $17.5m (Dec 2015: $15.7m; up 11%) Profit ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the addition ... report to their offering. ... The latest research Menopause Drugs Price Analysis and Strategies - 2016, provides ... research answers the following questions: What are ... they positioned in the Global Menopause market? What are ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: