Navigation Links
Radiation for Prostate Cancer Raises Risk of Other Cancers
Date:5/19/2008

Study finds slightly elevated chance of bladder, colorectal and lung malignancies

MONDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Men undergoing external beam radiation for localized prostate cancer may have a slightly increased risk of developing other cancers, researchers report.

The findings could have implications for men trying to decide which treatment is best for their prostate cancer, the researchers said.

"We saw an increased risk for lung, bladder and rectal cancer among patients treated with external beam radiation for prostate cancer," lead researcher Dr. Naeem Bhojani, from the University of Montreal's Department of Urology, said during a Monday teleconference at the American Urological Association annual meeting, in Orlando, Fla.

"However, in absolute terms, the absolute risk associated with the development of secondary malignancies in patients exposed to external beam radiation therapy is quite small," Bhojani said.

Among the treatments for prostate cancer are surgical removal of the prostate, called radical prostatectomy; implanted radioactive seeds that deliver radiation specifically to the prostate gland; and external beam radiation, which is a non-surgical procedure that delivers radiation to the prostate from outside the body.

Bhojani said external beam radiation is probably a better treatment choice for older patients rather than younger patients with longer life expectancies, who may be at risk for developing these secondary cancers.

For the study, by researchers from Canada, Italy and the United States, Bhojani's group collected data on 10,333 men being treated for localized prostate cancer. Among these men, 6,196 had their prostate surgically removed, and 4,137 underwent external beam radiation.

The researchers then looked at the later development of bladder, lung and rectal cancer, to see which treatment was more likely to increase the risk of these malignancies.

They found that men who'd undergone external beam radiation had a threefold increased rate of bladder cancer, a 1.8-fold increased rate of lung cancer, and a 1.7-fold increased rate of colorectal cancer, compared with men who underwent radical prostatectomy.

One cancer expert said he couldn't explain why external beam radiation would increase the risk of these cancers, especially lung cancer.

"I'm not sure how external beam radiation to the pelvis for prostate cancer would increase the risk for lung cancer," said Dr. Bruce Roth, professor of medicine and urologic surgery at Vanderbilt University.

The radiation therapy would be more likely to increase the risk for bladder cancer and colorectal cancer, which are nearer the prostate, he noted.

Roth said it's important to give prostate cancer patients several treatment choices. "I will give them a number of options and let them pick based on the side effect profile. There are many patients who may not be good surgical candidates, therefore you might lean toward external beam radiotherapy," he said.

In another study presented Monday, researchers found that survivors of childhood cancers treated with the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide were five times likelier to develop bladder cancer later in life, compared with the general population.

Children up to 4 years old treated with the drug for retinoblastoma, leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma had a particular risk for developing bladder cancer, the researchers found.

Cyclophosphamide is an immunosuppressive drug used to treat several types of cancers and is known to cause bladder damage that can lead to bladder cancer.

In patients followed for up to 50 years, the researchers found that the chances of developing bladder cancer increased over time. The percentage of patients diagnosed with bladder cancer at 20, 30, 40 and 50 years of age was 0.02 percent, 0.08 percent, 0.37 percent and 0.71 percent, respectively, the researchers reported.

More information

For more about prostate cancer, visit the National Cancer Institute.



SOURCES: Bruce Roth, M.D., professor, medicine and urologic surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.; May 19, 2008, teleconference with Naeem Bhojani, M.D., University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada; May 19, 2008, presentation, American Urological Association annual meeting, Orlando, Fla.


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Black Rectal Cancer Patients Less Likely to Get Chemo, Radiation
2. Space Radiation a Risk for Astronauts
3. Radiation beneficial for older breast cancer patients
4. Irradiation Almost Erases Risk of Food Poisoning
5. New Drug Protects Against Radiation Damage
6. Environmental Toxins, Radiation May Be Tied to Breast Cancer
7. Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy Works in Fewer, But Higher Doses
8. Ambulatory Services of America, Inc. Announces Joint Venture with Southern Ocean County Radiation Oncology, LLC
9. Study Finds Variations in Doses of Radiation Therapy
10. American Imaging Management Launches Patient Safety Program to Increase Awareness of Radiation Dose Associated with Advanced Imaging Procedures
11. Venture Global Limited Introduces an Innovative Anti-Cellphone Radiation Sticker Named VEGO Power Blocker
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... The Smart Machine Age is here, and it’s disrupting everything. Not only could ... in the United States may be taken over by technology in the next five ... steamrolls over colleagues is drawing to a close. Success will belong to those who ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... With millions of Americans and people worldwide struggling with ... aware of our options and are empowered with strength and information throughout the ... newest edition of "Vision and Hearing" in USA Today, that will educate readers ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... The narrative in “ Signal 8: ... ’s true account of his paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he saw, as ... attempts to overcome them. , Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path he wanted ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The California State University Institute for Palliative Care ... interested in palliative care education and research. The Symposium, “Innovate. Investigate. Educate: Advancing ... Diego on Sept. 28 and 29, 2017, on the campus of California State University ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... The International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp) announces the 2017 top five ... art competition. Selected from 15 submissions from around the nation, the top five finalists ... iaedp Symposium, March 22 – 26 in Las Vegas. , This year, the competition ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... Ind. , Feb. 24, 2017 Zimmer ... leader in musculoskeletal healthcare, will present at the Cowen ... at the Boston Marriott Copley Place on Tuesday, March ... A live webcast of the presentation can be ... archived for replay following the conference via Zimmer Biomet,s ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Feb. 24, 2017 Physician General Dr. ... Alcohol Programs Jennifer Smith commended South Central ... for and using naloxone, a life-saving overdose reversal drug. ... a recovery specialist and overdose survivor who was saved ... "A significant part of fighting the opioid ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 2017 The U.S. Food and Drug ... Kit, performed on the Pheno System. This is ... bloodstream infections and provide information about which antibiotics ... sensitivity). The test also reduces the amount of ... which can guide antibiotic treatment recommendations more quickly. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: