Navigation Links
Radiation fears should not deter women from mammography screening

OAK BROOK, Ill. The risk of radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening is slight in comparison to the benefit of expected lives saved, according to a new study appearing online and in the January issue of the journal Radiology.

"Recently, there have been reports in the press focusing on the potential radiation risk from mammography, particularly as used for periodic screening," said the study's lead author, Martin J. Yaffe, Ph.D., senior scientist in imaging research at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and professor in the departments of medical biophysics and medical imaging at the University of Toronto. "Our study shows that the risk of cancer associated with routine screening in women age 40 and over is very low, especially when compared to the benefits associated with early detection."

Dr. Yaffe and his colleague, James G. Mainprize, Ph.D., developed a model for estimating the risk of radiation-induced breast cancer following exposure of the breast to ionizing radiation from various screening mammography scenarios and estimated the potential number of breast cancers, fatal breast cancers, and years of life lost attributable to mammography screening.

Using a radiation dose estimate of 3.7 milligrays (mGy), which is typical for digital mammography, and a cohort of 100,000 women, the researchers applied the risk model to predict the number of radiation-induced breast cancers attributable to a single examination and then extended the model to various screening scenarios beginning and ending at different ages.

The results showed that in 100,000 women, each receiving a dose of 3.7 mGy to both breasts, annual screening from age 40 to 55 years and biennial screening thereafter to age 74 years would result in 86 radiation-induced cancers, including 11 fatal cancers, and 136 life years lost.

Conversely, for the same cohort it was estimated that 497 lives and 10,670 life years would be saved by earlier detection.

"The predicted risk of radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening is low in terms of the numbers of cancers induced, the number of potential deaths, and the number of years of life lost," Dr. Yaffe said. "For women over 40, the expected benefits afforded by routine screening in terms of lives saved or years of life saved greatly exceeds this risk. For these women, radiation risk should not be a deterrent from screening."


Contact: Linda Brooks
Radiological Society of North America

Related medicine news :

1. Hearing loss common following radiation therapy for head and neck cancer
2. Common for patients to undergo multiple cardiac imaging tests, with high cumulative radiation dose
3. Combining radiation therapy, chemotherapy safely treats head and neck cancer patients
4. Prognostic markers for prostate cancer patients who receive radiation after surgery
5. Researchers develop successful method for extracting and archiving patient radiation dose info
6. Henry Ford physicist awarded for cancer radiation therapy research
7. Cancer Risk From Radiation Doesnt Fade With Age
8. Targeted radiation therapy minimizes GI side effects for prostate cancer patients, Penn study shows
9. Adding radiation to hormone therapy for prostate cancer treatment will increase survival chances
10. Highly targeted radiation technique minimizes side effects of prostate cancer treatment
11. Newer, more intense chemotherapy with less radiation not more effective against Hodgkins lymphoma
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... , ... Symposium Chairman, Dr. Rod J. Rohrich is pleased to announce that ... March 2nd and 3rd, 2016. The annual meeting, along with the Dallas Rhinoplasty ... around the world. , Key topics at this year's event will include discussions on ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... Relay (, a ... announced today a significant contract that will provide its award-winning private messaging solution ... on the growing success of its Relay program, IBX Wire™, which now has ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... NavaFit Inc. today announced the launch of ... train with, participate in local fitness & sporting events, and stay motivated. ... high medical costs drive us to get more serious about fitness and wellness, individuals ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... Boston, MA (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... mortar of the body, including muscle, bone, and blood. But how much protein does ... more complicated than it might seem, according to the October 2015 issue of ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... Scientists in ... tissue biopsy in 18 patients with or without mesothelioma. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted ... , The doctors from PhenoPath Laboratories in Seattle and the University of British Columbia ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... , Oct. 13, 2015  Data Science Automation (DSA), ... opening of a new branch office in the ... DSA,s presence in Europe . The decision ... increasing demand for local support of customers in the medical ... Ph.D., DSA,s UK Branch Manager. "We have had tremendous success ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... -- SeraCare Life Sciences, a leading partner to global in ... medicine business unit has launched its second product in ... (NGS)-based tumor profiling assays.  The Seraseq TM Solid ... mutations in key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes as ... is offered at five additional allele frequencies. ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... , Oct. 13, 2015  Graduate students across ... and medical research, will soon have the opportunity ... care – the drug discovery and development process. ... has collaborated with 10 leaders from academic institutions ... Medicines: The Process of Drug Development."  Lilly will ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: